Bellevue Hospital Center

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - View original article

Bellevue Hospital Center
New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation
Bellevue Psychiatric Hospital old building.jpg
The original Bellevue Psychiatric Hospital building
Geography
Location462 First Avenue, New York, NY, United States
Organization
Care systemMedicare, Medicaid, Public
Hospital typeTeaching, psychiatric
Affiliated universityNew York University
Services
Emergency departmentLevel I trauma center
HelipadEast 34th Street Heliport (IATA: TSS)
Beds861 general, 339 psychiatric (1200 beds total)
History
FoundedMarch 31st, 1736
Links
Websitenyc.gov/bellevue
ListsHospitals in the United States
Other linksHospitals in New York
 
Jump to: navigation, search

Coordinates: 40°44′21″N 73°58′31″W / 40.7393°N 73.9753°W / 40.7393; -73.9753

Bellevue Hospital Center
New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation
Bellevue Psychiatric Hospital old building.jpg
The original Bellevue Psychiatric Hospital building
Geography
Location462 First Avenue, New York, NY, United States
Organization
Care systemMedicare, Medicaid, Public
Hospital typeTeaching, psychiatric
Affiliated universityNew York University
Services
Emergency departmentLevel I trauma center
HelipadEast 34th Street Heliport (IATA: TSS)
Beds861 general, 339 psychiatric (1200 beds total)
History
FoundedMarch 31st, 1736
Links
Websitenyc.gov/bellevue
ListsHospitals in the United States
Other linksHospitals in New York
An engraving from 1866 showing the city's first morgue, located in Bellevue
The "Cube", built in 1973 along the FDR Drive at the East River

Bellevue Hospital Center, most often referred to as "Bellevue", was founded on March 31, 1736 and is the oldest public hospital in the United States. Located on First Avenue in the Kips Bay neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City, Bellevue is famous from many literary, film and television references, and as the training ground for many of America's leaders in medicine. Affiliated with the New York University School of Medicine since 1968, Bellevue has been the site of many milestones in the history of medicine,[1] from the establishment of the first ambulance service and first maternity ward, to Nobel Prize-winning cardiac catheterization laboratory.

Bellevue is exceptionally well known for its psychiatric facilities and its emergency department, being named New York's #1 hospital in Emergency Care by New York Magazine.[2] It has opened a new ambulatory care building dedicated to serving over 300,000 outpatients a year as well as burn units for pediatric (children) and adult burn patients. The hospital serves as a primary referral center for cardiac catheterization, catheter-based treatment of heart rhythm disorders, cardiovascular surgery, neurosurgery, physical rehabilitation and Hansen's disease (leprosy).

As the flagship facility of New York City’s Health and Hospitals Corporation Bellevue is open to patients of all backgrounds irrespective of ability to pay. It handles nearly 670,000 non-ER outpatient clinic visits, over 99,000 emergency visits[3] and some 26,000 inpatients each year. More than 80 percent of Bellevue’s patients come from the city’s medically underserved populations. Today, the hospital occupies a 25-story patient care facility with a state of the art ICU, digital radiology communication and a new modern outpatient facility. The hospital has an attending physician staff of 1800 and an in-house staff of more than 1000. Steven Alexander became Bellevue Hospital Center's Executive Director in 2013.[4]

Bellevue Hospital is home to FDNY-EMS Battalion 8, formerly NYC*EMS Station 13.

Since 1998 the building which once served as the hospital's psychiatric facility has been used as a homeless intake center and a men's homeless shelter. Plans to redevelop it as a hotel and conference center connected to NYU Langone Medical Center fell through in April 2010.[5]

Timeline[edit]

Bellevue was founded in 1736, at a time when New York City did not extend much farther north than Wall Street. It was established in what was then wilderness, almost 2 miles north of the settled region of Manhattan, in order to quarantine the sick. When the grid system of streets was established much later in 1811, the survey had to take Bellevue into account and the placement of First Avenue on the grid is entirely due to the location of Bellevue.[citation needed]

References[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ "Bellevue Hospital Center". New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation. Archived from the original on 1 May 2007. Retrieved 2007-04-17. 
  2. ^ http://nymag.com/health/besthospitals/24095/index4.html
  3. ^ https://freida.ama-assn.org/Freida/user/institutionSearchSubmit.do?forward=affiliated&instNbr=350235
  4. ^ http://www.nyc.gov/html/hhc/html/pressroom/press-release-20130829-new-executive-director-bellevue.shtml
  5. ^ Rubinstein, Dana (April 15, 2010). "Bellevue Redevelopment Officially Dead". The New York Observer. Retrieved 2010-07-16. 
  6. ^ Bell, Ryan Corbett (2009). The Ambulance: A History. Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland & Co. ISBN 978-0-7864-3811-2. 
  7. ^ Annual Report, Volume 1, by New York (State). Dept. of Social Welfare, 1908, page 268
  8. ^ No One Was Turned Away : The Role of Public Hospitals in New York City since ... by Department of Urban Studies at Vassar College, 1999, page 67
  9. ^ "'Paralytic' Flees from Prison Ward; Captain Fritz Duquesne, Who Feigned Helplessness, Escapes from Bellevue". The New York Times. May 28, 1919. p. 16. Retrieved 2010-07-16. 
  10. ^ Ashley Jennings (October 31, 2012). "New York City's Bellevue Hospital Forced to Evacuate Patients After Sandy". ABC News. Retrieved October 31, 2012. 
  11. ^ http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/01/nyregion/bellevue-hospital-evacuates-patients-after-backup-power-fails.html?adxnnl=1&adxnnlx=1351760392-LwwHsBu8EELSTA6ffELmMg&_r=0
Further reading

External links[edit]