Beige

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BeigeHow to read this color infobox
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet#F5F5DC
sRGBB  (rgb)(245, 245, 220)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k)(0, 0, 10, 4)
HSV       (h, s, v)(60°, 10%, 96%)
SourceX11
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)
 
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Freshly-sheared wool from the Royal Winter Fair.
BeigeHow to read this color infobox
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet#F5F5DC
sRGBB  (rgb)(245, 245, 220)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k)(0, 0, 10, 4)
HSV       (h, s, v)(60°, 10%, 96%)
SourceX11
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

Beige is a term used for a range of pale brownish or yellowish colors. It is variously described as a pale sandy fawn color,[1] a grayish tan,[2] a light-grayish yellowish brown, or a pale to grayish yellow.[3] It takes its name from the French word for the color of natural wool.[4] It has come to be used to describe a variety of light tints chosen for their neutral or pale warm appearance.

Beige was used as a color term in the modern sense in France beginning approximately 1855-60; the writer Edmond de Goncourt used it in the novel La Fille Elisa in 1877. The first recorded use of beige as a color name in English was in 1887.[5]

Beginning in the 1920s, the meaning of beige expanded so that it is now also used not only for pale yellowish-brown colors, but also for a wide range of pale brown and light brown shades. Some of more notable of these tints and shades are shown below.

Beige is notoriously difficult to produce in traditional offset CMYK printing due to the low levels of inks used on each plate; often it will print in purple or green and vary within a print run.

Variations of beige[edit]

Cosmic latte[edit]

Main article: Cosmic latte
Cosmic LatteHow to read this color infobox
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet#FFF8E7
sRGBB  (rgb)(255, 248, 231)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k)(0, 2.7, 99.6, 0)
HSV       (h, s, v)(40°, 94%, 90%)
SourceInternet
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

Cosmic latte is a name assigned in 2002 to the average color of the universe (derived from a sampling of the electromagnetic radiation from 200,000 galaxies), given by a team of astronomers from Johns Hopkins University.


Cream[edit]

Main article: Cream (colour)
CreamHow to read this color infobox
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet#FFFDD0
sRGBB  (rgb)(255, 253, 208)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k)(0, 1, 18, 0)
HSV       (h, s, v)(57°, 18%, 100%)
Source[Unsourced]
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

Cream is the color of the cream produced by cattle grazing on natural pasture with plants rich in yellow carotenoid pigments, some of which are incorporated into the cream, to give a yellow tone to white.

The first recorded use of cream as a color name in English was in 1590.[6]

Unbleached silk[edit]

Unbleached SilkHow to read this color infobox
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet#FFDDCA
sRGBB  (rgb)(255, 221, 202)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k)(0, 3, 21, 0)
HSV       (h, s, v)(22°, 21%, 100%)
SourceJTC
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

The color unbleached silk is shown at right.

This color is one of the Japanese traditional colors in use since beginning in 660 CE in the form of various dyes that are used in designing kimonos.[7][8]

The name of this color in Japanese is shironeri.

Tuscan[edit]

Main article: Tuscan red
TuscanHow to read this color infobox
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet#FAD6A5
sRGBB  (rgb)(250, 214, 165)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k)(0, 14, 31, 2)
HSV       (h, s, v)(35°, 34%, 98[9]%)
SourceISCC-NBS
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

Displayed at right is the color Tuscan.

The first recorded use of Tuscan as a color name in English was in 1887.[10]


Buff[edit]

Main article: Buff (colour)
BuffHow to read this color infobox
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet#F0DC82
sRGBB  (rgb)(240, 220, 130)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k)(0, 8, 46, 6)
HSV       (h, s, v)(49°, 46%, 94%)
Source[Unsourced]
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

Buff is a pale yellow-brown color that got its name from the color of buffed leather.[11]

Buff is the color of fine undyed leathers

According to the Oxford English Dictionary, buff as a descriptor of a color was first used in the London Gazette of 1686, describing a uniform to be "A Red Coat with a Buff-colour'd lining".[12]


Desert sand[edit]

Main article: Desert sand (color)
Desert SandHow to read this color infobox
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet#EDC9AF
sRGBB  (rgb)(237, 201, 175)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k)(0, 17, 26, 8)
HSV       (h, s, v)(19°, 26%, 92[13]%)
SourceCrayola
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

The color desert sand is displayed at right. It may be regarded as a deep shade of beige. It is a pale tint of a color called desert. The color name "desert" was first used in 1920.[14]

A "beige" AT&T telephone.

In the 1960s the American Telephone & Telegraph Company (AT&T) marketed desert sand colored telephones for offices and homes. However, they described the color as "beige". It is therefore common for many people to refer to the color desert sand as "beige".


Ecru[edit]

Main article: ecru (colour)
EcruHow to read this color infobox
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet#C2B280
sRGBB  (rgb)(194, 178, 128)
HSV       (h, s, v)(45°, 34%, 76%)
SourceISCC-NBS
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

The color ecru is displayed at right.

Originally in the 19th century and up to at least 1930, the color ecru meant exactly the same color as beige (i.e. the pale cream color shown above as beige),[15] and the word is often used to refer to such fabrics as silk and linen in their unbleached state. Ecru comes from the French word écru, which means literally 'raw' or 'unbleached'.

Since at least the 1950s, however, the color ecru has been regarded as a different color from beige, presumably in order to allow interior designers a wider palette of colors to choose from.[16]

Khaki[edit]

Main article: Khaki (color)
KhakiHow to read this color infobox
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet#C3B091
sRGBB  (rgb)(195, 176, 145)
HSV       (h, s, v)(37°, 26%, 76%)
SourceHTML/CSS
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

Displayed at right is the color khaki.

This is the web color called khaki in HTML/CSS.

The color shown at right matches the color designated as khaki in the 1930 book A Dictionary of Color, the standard for color nomenclature before the introduction of computers.

The first recorded use of khaki as a color name in English was in 1848.[17]

Light French beige[edit]

Beige (Pourpre.com)How to read this color infobox
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet#C8AD7F
sRGBB  (rgb)(200, 173, 127)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k)(0, 14, 37, 22)
HSV       (h, s, v)(38°, 37%, 78[18]%)
SourcePourpre.com
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

Light French beige is the color called beige on the pourpre.com website, a color list widely popular in France.

French beige[edit]

French BeigeHow to read this color infobox
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet#A67B5B
sRGBB  (rgb)(166, 123, 91)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k)(0, 26, 45, 35)
HSV       (h, s, v)(26°, 45%, 65[19]%)
SourceISCC-NBS
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

At right is displayed the color French beige.

The first recorded use of French beige as a color name in English was in 1927.[20]

The source of this color is the following website: ISCC-NBS Dictionary of Color Names (1955)--Color Sample of French beige (color sample #57)

Mode beige[edit]

Mode BeigeHow to read this color infobox
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet#967117
sRGBB  (rgb)(150, 113, 23)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k)(0, 24, 85, 41)
HSV       (h, s, v)(43°, 85%, 59[21]%)
SourceISCC-NBS
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

Mode beige is a very dark shade of beige.

Two other alternate names for this exact color are drab and sand dune,[22] in use, respectively, since 1686[23] and 1925.[24]

The first recorded use of mode beige as a color name in English was in 1928.[25]

The color mode beige is a masterpiece of rebranding—taking the color "drab", a color whose name had become a synonym for dullness, and remaking it into the exciting, fun color "mode beige".

Beige in nature[edit]

Fish

Beige in human culture[edit]

Beige is often employed as a metaphor for dullness, neutrality or conformity. For example, on Futurama, the inhabitants of the Neutral Planet declare a "beige alert" when their population is under threat. Also, when discussing playing Al Gore on The Late Show with David Letterman, Darrell Hammond pondered, "How do you spruce up beige?"

Business

Computers

Entertainment

Ethnography

Food

Literature

Sexuality

Sports

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Oxford English Dictionary
  2. ^ Webster's New World Dictionary of the English Language, 1964
  3. ^ MacMillan On-Line Dictionary.
  4. ^ MacMillan On-Line dictionary, and Le Petit Robert Dictionaire.
  5. ^ Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Colour New York:1930 McGraw-Hill Page 190; Color Sample of Beige: Page 45 Plate 11 Color Sample C2 The color shown above matches the color sample in the book.
  6. ^ Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill Page 206; Color Sample of Cream: Page 41 Plate 9 Color Sample D4 The color shown above matches the color sample in the book.
  7. ^ Nagasaki, Seiki. Nihon no dentoshoku : sono shikimei to shikicho, Seigensha, 2001. ISBN 4-916094-53-0
  8. ^ Nihon Shikisai Gakkai. Shinpen shikisai kagaku handobukku, Tokyo Daigaku Shuppankai, 1985. ISBN 4-13-061000-7
  9. ^ web.forret.com Color Conversion Tool set to hex code #FAD6A5 (Tuscan):
  10. ^ Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill Page 206; Color Sample of Tuscan: Page 43 Plate 10 Color Sample E5
  11. ^ Paterson, Ian (2003), A Dictionary of Colour (1st paperback ed.), London: Thorogood (published 2004), p. 73, ISBN 1-85418-375-3, OCLC 60411025 
  12. ^ "buff, adj.1". Oxford English Dictionary. OUP. Retrieved 21 April 2011. 
  13. ^ web.forret.com Color Conversion Tool set to hex code of color #EDC9AF (Desert Sand):
  14. ^ Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill Page 194; Color Sample of Desert: Page 47 Plate 12 Color Sample I7
  15. ^ Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill Page 149--Discussion of the color Beige (shown in this book's color sample as being the same color that is displayed as "beige" in the Wikipedia color box shown above) notes that beige is exactly the same color as Ecru.
  16. ^ 1955 ISCC-NBS color chart (scanned onto the Internet) shows ecru as being a different color than beige):
  17. ^ Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill Page 197; Color Sample of Khaki: Page 49 Plate 13 Color Sample J7
  18. ^ web.forret.com Color Conversion Tool set to hex code of color #C8AD7F (Light French Beige):
  19. ^ web.forret.com Color Conversion Tool set to hex code of color #A67B5B (French Beige):
  20. ^ Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill Page 195; Color Sample of French beige: Page 49 Plate 13 Color Sample A7
  21. ^ web.forret.com Color Conversion Tool set to hex code of color #967117 (Mode Beige):
  22. ^ Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill Page 50
  23. ^ Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill Page 194
  24. ^ Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill Page 204
  25. ^ Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill Page 199; Color Sample of Mode Beige: Page 47 Plate 14 Color Sample B5
  26. ^ Boyd, Nan Alamilla Wide Open Town: A History of Queer San Francisco to 1965 Berkeley, California:2003 University of California Press Page 245 List of North Beach Gay Bars and Restaurants 1938-1965, with map on page 244
  27. ^ Boyd, Nan Alamilla Wide Open Town: A History of Queer San Francisco to 1965 Berkeley, California:2003 University of California Press Page 131-132