The Country Bears

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The Country Bears

Promotional film poster
Directed byPeter Hastings
Produced byJeffrey Chernov
Andrew Gunn
Written byMark Perez
Based onWalt Disney's Country Bear Jamboree
StarringHaley Joel Osment
Kevin Michael Richardson
Diedrich Bader
Brad Garrett
Stephen Root
Toby Huss
Candy Ford
James Gammon
Christopher Walken
Music byChristopher Young
Don Henley
CinematographyMitchell Amundsen
Editing byGeorge Bowers
Seth Flaun
Dean Holland
Distributed byWalt Disney Pictures
Release date(s)
  • July 21, 2002 (2002-07-21)
Running time88 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Budget$35 million
Box office$27,002,097
 
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The Country Bears

Promotional film poster
Directed byPeter Hastings
Produced byJeffrey Chernov
Andrew Gunn
Written byMark Perez
Based onWalt Disney's Country Bear Jamboree
StarringHaley Joel Osment
Kevin Michael Richardson
Diedrich Bader
Brad Garrett
Stephen Root
Toby Huss
Candy Ford
James Gammon
Christopher Walken
Music byChristopher Young
Don Henley
CinematographyMitchell Amundsen
Editing byGeorge Bowers
Seth Flaun
Dean Holland
Distributed byWalt Disney Pictures
Release date(s)
  • July 21, 2002 (2002-07-21)
Running time88 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Budget$35 million
Box office$27,002,097

The Country Bears is a 2002 American live-action comedy film, produced by Walt Disney Pictures, based on the Disney attraction Country Bear Jamboree, and released July 26, 2002. It was Disney's third film based on an attraction at one of its theme parks, following Tower of Terror (1997) and Mission to Mars (2000) and followed by the Pirates of the Caribbean film series.

Contents

Plot

Beary Barrington, a young bear raised by a human family in a world where humans and talking bears co-exist, attempts to trace his roots. He meets up with the Country Bears, a Country music band that reached its peak years ago and eventually broke up (a parody of the Eagles). Beary helps the Country Bears reunite for one final concert while searching for who he truly is.

Thanks to Beary, the band realizes they were wrong to break up, due to various petty arguments that escalated. Beary returns home to his family understanding that they truly do care about him.

Country Bear Hall, the place at which the band used to perform, is threatened with destruction but the Country Bears decide to do a concert to save it. However, they refuse to do so without Beary who brought them back together after they read an essay he wrote about them.

The band goes to get Beary and his family, but while Ted Bedderhead, the band leader and member who was the most reluctant to reunite, is apologizing to Beary and explaining everything to him, Reed Thimble kidnaps the rest of the Country Bears because he wants to destroy the Hall.

Thanks to an idea from Dex, Beary, his older brother Ted, and their family are able to track down and rescue the band and head to the concert together. The promoter that was hired to publicize the concert is found to have been paid off by Thimble so the concert appears to be headed for failure. Big Al, the caretaker of the hall, reveals that everyone was just out back and when he opens the door surge of people rush in. The money raised from the concert is revealed to be enough to save the hall and the Country Bears perform with Beary as member of the band.

Cast

Voices

Puppeteers

Musical numbers

[1]

Filming

It was filmed in Franklin, Tennessee as well as various locations in California.[2] The animatronic bears used in the film are provided by Jim Henson's Creature Shop.

Reception

The film was a flop; budgeted at US$35 million, it grossed only $16,990,825 in the US and an additional $1,021,272 overseas. The film was released on DVD and VHS in December 17, 2002. On Rotten Tomatoes, the film only received a 26% positive rating; its consensus stated: "Despite all the celebrities on hand, this spin-off from a theme park attraction still feels tired and hokey." Film critic Roger Ebert said "the formidable technical skills in The Country Bears must not be allowed to distract from the film's terminal inanity." Critic Sean O'Connell said of the film, "Bears is bad. Not 'terrible filmmaking' bad, but more like, 'I once had a nightmare like this, and it's now coming true' bad." It had a few positive reviews but most criticized it for lacking entertaining acting or an enjoyable storyline.

Christopher Walken was nominated for a Razzie award for Worst Supporting Actor for his performance in the film.[3]

References

  1. ^ Soundtrack imdb.com, accessed July 12, 2009
  2. ^ [1]
  3. ^ [2]

External links