Bea Benaderet

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Bea Benaderet
Bea Benadaret 1966.JPG
Benadaret in 1966.
BornBeatrice Benaderet
(1906-04-04)April 4, 1906
New York City, New York, U.S.
DiedOctober 13, 1968(1968-10-13) (aged 62)
Los Angeles, California, U.S.
Cause of deathLung cancer
pneumonia
Resting placeValhalla Memorial Park Cemetery in North Hollywood, California
Years active1926–1968
ReligionJewish
Spouse(s)Jim Bannon
(1938–1950; divorced)
Eugene Twombly
(1957–1968; her death)
 
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Bea Benaderet
Bea Benadaret 1966.JPG
Benadaret in 1966.
BornBeatrice Benaderet
(1906-04-04)April 4, 1906
New York City, New York, U.S.
DiedOctober 13, 1968(1968-10-13) (aged 62)
Los Angeles, California, U.S.
Cause of deathLung cancer
pneumonia
Resting placeValhalla Memorial Park Cemetery in North Hollywood, California
Years active1926–1968
ReligionJewish
Spouse(s)Jim Bannon
(1938–1950; divorced)
Eugene Twombly
(1957–1968; her death)

Beatrice "Bea" Benaderet (April 4, 1906 – October 13, 1968)[1] was an American actress born in New York City and reared in San Francisco, California. She appeared in a wide variety of television work, which included a starring role in the 1960s television series Petticoat Junction and Green Acres as Shady Rest Hotel owner Kate Bradley, supporting roles as Blanche Morton in The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show and as the original voice of Betty Rubble during the first four seasons of The Flintstones, and in The Beverly Hillbillies as Pearl Bodine. She did a great deal of voice work in Warner Bros. animated cartoons of the 1940s/1950s, most famously as Granny.

Early life[edit]

Benaderet's father Samuel was a Turkish Jewish emigrant, and her mother, Margaret (née O'Keefe) was Irish-American.[2]

Radio career[edit]

Their daughter first received notice for her radio work in the 1940s playing Millicent Carstairs on Fibber McGee & Molly, telephone operator Gertrude Gearshift (and many other roles) on The Jack Benny Program, school principal Eve Goodwin on The Great Gildersleeve, and appeared on the occasional Amos 'n Andy radio show, usually as a store clerk attempting to assist Andy and Kingfish in a purchase. She was active in Orson Welles' Mercury Theater and appeared in the 1938 "A Christmas Carol". During this period, Benaderet had two children, Jack and Maggie, from her marriage to actor Jim Bannon.

Benaderet played Blanche Morton, the next-door neighbor to George Burns and Gracie Allen, on both the radio and television incarnations of The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show. She also held down a regular role in the series A Day in the Life of Dennis Day as Mrs. Anderson, Day's landlady, who was also the mother of Day's girlfriend on the program. She voiced widow Clara Longnecker on The Mel Blanc Show, wherein she often fended off the money-mad proposals of Mel's uncle Rupert with the exclamation, "Now, Rupert, I am in NO mood for your nincompoopity!" On The Adventures of Maisie, which starred Ann Sothern, she played various roles, including that of the title character's landlady.

She portrayed Lucille Ball's best friend, Iris Attebury, on the 1940s radio series My Favorite Husband. When Ball and husband Desi Arnaz decided to develop this program for television in a CBS series called I Love Lucy, Benaderet was first choice to fill the role of Ethel Mertz, but was ultimately unavailable to accept it since she had already been cast for the fledgling television production of The Burns and Allen Show. Vivian Vance, a relatively unknown character actress and singer, was eventually cast in the part. Benaderet did appear in a guest role on I Love Lucy on January 21, 1952, as "Miss Lewis", a love-starved spinster neighbor. She guest starred with Fred Clark – they played Mr. and Mrs. Springer – in the 1962 episode, "Continental Dinner", the series finale of the CBS sitcom, Pete and Gladys, starring Harry Morgan and Cara Williams.

Voice acting[edit]

Benaderet began voicing the character of Granny (the sometimes dimwitted, sometimes assertive owner of Tweety) in the Warner Bros. cartoon series beginning in 1943. Benaderet continued to perform the voice of Granny well into the 1950s, when June Foray replaced her in that role in 1955. Benaderet voiced numerous female characters in the Warner Bros. animated shorts of the 1940s, displaying a great deal of versatility in her repertoire, from her natural feminine voice, to the "Granny" character, to the loquacious bobby-soxer (inspired by loud-mouthed comedienne Cass Daley) in Little Red Riding Rabbit (1944).

Later life and career[edit]

Benaderet was busy during the last decade of her life, starting with a voice role as Betty Rubble in the animated series The Flintstones, which debuted in 1960. The Flintstones reunited Benaderet with her 1940s co-workers Alan Reed (Fred Flintstone) and Mel Blanc (Barney Rubble and Dino). Benaderet received no on-screen credit for her many voice characterizations with Warner Bros., as the studio was bound by Blanc's contractual stipulation that no other voice actor receive credit while he was under contract to Warners.[citation needed]

Benaderet was considered for the role of Granny in The Beverly Hillbillies by producer Paul Henning, who felt she was too buxom and feminine for the character he envisioned as a frail but caustic spitfire; Irene Ryan was eventually cast. Henning cast Benaderet as middle-aged, widowed Cousin Pearl Bodine (Jethro's mother), and she appeared in the pilot, as well as a majority of episodes throughout the series' first season. Cousin Pearl and her daughter Jethrine (Max Baer, Jr. in drag) moved into the Clampett mansion in the first season. However, the female Bodines disappeared after Henning cast Benaderet in his next series Petticoat Junction, which premiered in September 1963. She starred as Kate Bradley, owner/operator of the Shady Rest Hotel, a cousin of Pearl Bodine.

Petticoat Junction proved an enormous hit in its first season, and remained a top-25 program for several years. Benaderet had done a radio variation of Green Acres with Gale Gordon beginning in 1950 called Granby's Green Acres. Green Acres was a spinoff of Petticoat Junction, with Eva Gabor portraying Benaderet's original part, and Benaderet herself appearing in several episodes as her Petticoat Junction character, in order to establish the Hooterville setting (Eddie Albert took Gale Gordon's role as the lawyer who moves to the country to become a farmer, Gordon was then occupied with his role as "Mr. Mooney" on The Lucy Show).

Benaderet was diagnosed with cancer in 1967, which led to her departure from Petticoat Junction in what was hoped would be a temporary absence; Rosemary DeCamp was brought in to play "Aunt Helen".[clarification needed] Benaderet returned before being written out permanently. Shortly after the death of Benaderet, June Lockhart was brought in to play a female doctor who had set up her practice at the Shady Rest hotel, and thus became the show's surrogate mother figure.

Without Benaderet as the warm, motherly figure, as well as a central character, Petticoat Junction suffered in the ratings. As a result, the sitcom was originally going to be canceled in the spring of 1969. However, in order to give the program five full years of color episodes for syndication, CBS renewed the series for a seventh season. During its final year, the ratings improved a little, but CBS nonetheless canceled it in the spring of 1970 as part of the network's "rural purge" in favor of more sophisticated programs which would presumably appeal to demographics more desirable to advertisers.

Personal life and death[edit]

On October 13, 1968, Benaderet died in Los Angeles, California, at the Good Samaritan Hospital from lung cancer and pneumonia.

She was entombed in Valhalla Memorial Park Cemetery in North Hollywood, Los Angeles, California. Her second husband Eugene Twombly died of a heart attack on the day of her funeral (four days after her death) and was interred beside her. Twombly had been a sound-effects artist for a number of radio and television shows, including The Jack Benny Program, on which Benaderet had been a regular cast member.[citation needed]

Filmography[edit]

Radio[edit]

Features[edit]

Shorts[edit]

Television work[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ NOTE: Although most sources indicate 1906 as Benaderet's year of birth, according to United States census records, she was 23 years old in April 1930, indicating 1907 as her year of birth. Also, her gravestone indicates 1908 as her year of birth. However, California Deaths, 1940-1997. Family Tree Legends Records Collection (Online Database) confirms the 1906 birth year.
  2. ^ Jim Cox, The Great Radio Sitcoms, McFarland & Company Incorporated Pub, 2007, p. 191.

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]