Bath, North Carolina

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Bath, North Carolina
Town
Location of Bath, North Carolina
Coordinates: 35°28′28″N 76°48′32″W / 35.47444°N 76.80889°W / 35.47444; -76.80889Coordinates: 35°28′28″N 76°48′32″W / 35.47444°N 76.80889°W / 35.47444; -76.80889
CountryUnited States
StateNorth Carolina
CountyBeaufort
Area
 • Total1.1 sq mi (2.7 km2)
 • Land0.4 sq mi (0.9 km2)
 • Water0.7 sq mi (1.8 km2)
Elevation13 ft (4 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total249
 • Density230/sq mi (92/km2)
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code27808
Area code(s)252
FIPS code37-03840[1]
GNIS feature ID1018985[2]
WebsiteHistoric Town of Bath
 
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Bath, North Carolina
Town
Location of Bath, North Carolina
Coordinates: 35°28′28″N 76°48′32″W / 35.47444°N 76.80889°W / 35.47444; -76.80889Coordinates: 35°28′28″N 76°48′32″W / 35.47444°N 76.80889°W / 35.47444; -76.80889
CountryUnited States
StateNorth Carolina
CountyBeaufort
Area
 • Total1.1 sq mi (2.7 km2)
 • Land0.4 sq mi (0.9 km2)
 • Water0.7 sq mi (1.8 km2)
Elevation13 ft (4 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total249
 • Density230/sq mi (92/km2)
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code27808
Area code(s)252
FIPS code37-03840[1]
GNIS feature ID1018985[2]
WebsiteHistoric Town of Bath

Bath is a town in Beaufort County, North Carolina, United States. The population was 249 at the 2010 census. Incorporated in 1705, Bath was North Carolina's first port of entry, mostly with trade in naval stores, furs, and tobacco. Bath is North Carolina's oldest town, celebrating its 300th anniversary in 2005. Bath is located in North Carolina's coastal plains region. Bath is located on the Pamlico River, close to the point where the river empties into the Pamlico Sound, making the town a prestige spot for fish, shrimp, and crab.

Geography[edit]

Bath is located at 35°28′28″N 76°48′32″W / 35.47444°N 76.80889°W / 35.47444; -76.80889 (35.474437, -76.808863).[3]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 1.1 square miles (2.8 km2), of which, 0.4 square miles (1.0 km2) of it is land and 0.7 square miles (1.8 km2) of it (65.71%) is water.

Demographics[edit]

As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 275 people, 122 households, and 86 families residing in the town. The population density was 759.0 people per square mile (294.9/km²). There were 150 housing units at an average density of 414.0 per square mile (160.9/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 95.64% White, 2.91% African American, 1.09% Native American, and 0.36% from other races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.82% of the population.

There were 122 households out of which 21.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.3% were married couples living together, 5.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.5% were non-families. 27.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 18.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.25 and the average family size was 2.73.

In the town the population was spread out with 19.6% under the age of 18, 3.3% from 18 to 24, 21.1% from 25 to 44, 32.0% from 45 to 64, and 24.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 49 years. For every 100 females there were 92.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.9 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $50,625, and the median income for a family was $58,125. Males had a median income of $45,625 versus $23,958 for females. The per capita income for the town was $23,029. About 8.0% of families and 8.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.8% of those under the age of eighteen and 11.3% of those sixty five or over.

History and Legends[edit]

European settlement near the Pamlico River in the 1690s led to the founding of Bath. The first settlers were French Protestants from Virginia; among those inhabitants was John Lawson, naturalist, explorer, and town father. In 1708, Bath consisted of 12 houses and about 50 people. Early Bath was disturbed by political rivalries, epidemics, Indian wars (the Tuscarora War), and piracy. Yellow fever plagued the town along with a severe drought in 1711. A war between the early settlers and the powerful Tuscarora Indians followed the fever and drought. [4] Bath was the first nominal capital of North Carolina, but the colony had no permanent institutions of government until their establishment in New Bern. Four subjects loom large in Bath's history. In chronological order, they are:

Bath Today[edit]

One of the great rarities of Bath is that it is remarkably unchanged since its colonial origins. Bath has become more of a vacation spot for locals of eastern North Carolina and tourist location of visitors. With the location of Bath creek right off the Pamlico River, it makes a great spot for fishing and boating. Although the population of Bath may still be small, it brings good crowds during the summer months. Some of the favorite summer activities of those that travel to Bath are wakeboarding, skiing, and just a casual boat ride or jet ski ride through the creek up to the river.

There are many attractions today that bring visitors to the town of Bath. Some of those include the Historic Bath State Historic Site, which gives tours of the old town of Bath, St. Thomas Church, which is the first Episcopal Church in North Carolina that still stands, historical houses, and a visitor’s center. There is a fun and exciting ferry route that runs from the northern shore of the Pamlico River to the southern shore of the river. Goose Creek State Park gives you the experience of the beautiful marshes and swamps along the Pamlico River and Goose Creek. You can canoe along these exquisite waters and even fish on the shores of the river.[7]

Photographs of Bath[edit]

Photographs of Bath, NC.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  2. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  4. ^ John Lawson's Bath: A Subterranean Perspective. North Carolina Historical Review,
  5. ^ Naturalist, Explorer, and Town Father -- John Lawson and Bath. North Carolina Historical Review, 88(3), 250-264
  6. ^ Rev. Mark H. Creech. 2004. Forgotten by men and nations, the Methodist Curse Lives on
  7. ^ http://www.nchistoricsites.org/bath/main.htm

External links[edit]