Barbara Bain

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Barbara Bain

Barbara Bain (2006)
BornMillicent Fogel
(1931-09-13) September 13, 1931 (age 81)
Chicago, Illinois, U.S.
Occupation Actor
Years active 1958–present
Spouse(s)Martin Landau (m. 1957–1993) «start: (1957)–end+1: (1994)»"Marriage: Martin Landau to Barbara Bain" Location: (linkback://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbara_Bain)
 
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Barbara Bain

Barbara Bain (2006)
BornMillicent Fogel
(1931-09-13) September 13, 1931 (age 81)
Chicago, Illinois, U.S.
Occupation Actor
Years active 1958–present
Spouse(s)Martin Landau (m. 1957–1993) «start: (1957)–end+1: (1994)»"Marriage: Martin Landau to Barbara Bain" Location: (linkback://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbara_Bain)

Barbara Bain (born September 13, 1931) is an American actress.

Contents

Early life

Bain was born in Chicago as Millicent Fogel, the daughter of immigrants from Russia.[1] She graduated from the University of Illinois with a bachelor's degree in sociology. She moved to New York City, where she was a dancer and high fashion model. Bain studied with Martha Graham, thus cementing her interest in dancing. After attending Lee Strasberg's Actors' Studio, she became an actress.

Career

Barbara Bain as Cinnamon Carter, 1969.

On CBS's Mission: Impossible, Bain played Cinnamon Carter from 1966 until 1969 and again in one 1997 episode of Dick Van Dyke's Diagnosis: Murder. She guest starred as Madelyn Terry in the episode "The Case of the Wary Wildcatter" of CBS's Perry Mason series that aired in 1960. She was nominated for a Golden Globe Award for Actress in a Television Series for her performance in Mission: Impossible in 1968. She won three consecutive Emmys for Best Dramatic Actress for that series in 1967, 1968, and 1969.[2]

Her then husband, Martin Landau, also starred in Mission: Impossible. The two both left the series in 1969. She starred opposite Landau again in the science fiction television series Space: 1999 (1975–1977), as Dr. Helena Russell. Bain and Landau also performed together on screen in the 1981 made-for-TV film The Harlem Globetrotters on Gilligan's Island. Bain also appeared in Season 2 of the television series The Dick Van Dyke Show in the episode "Will You Two Be My Wife?". Bain appeared on an episode of My So-Called Life, playing main character Angela Chase's grandmother. She appeared in the episode "Matroyoshka" of Millennium, a late-'90s sci-fi series. In 1998, Bain was a special guest star in the Walker, Texas Ranger episode ("Saving Grace") as Mother Superior. In 2006, Bain had a minor role in an episode of CSI: Crime Scene Investigation ("Living Legends"), which featured a suspect, played by Roger Daltrey, who used stretch rubber face masks, similar to those used in the old Mission: Impossible series, to kill his enemies. In 2008, Bain appeared in the episode "What Are Little Girls Made Of?" of the TV show Ben 10: Alien Force, voicing Verdona Tennyson, the grandmother of Ben Tennyson and Gwen Tennyson, alongside her daughter, Juliet Landau.

Personal life

In 1957, she married actor Martin Landau, with whom she later starred on television. Landau and Bain divorced in 1993. The couple had two daughters, actress Juliet Landau and film producer Susan Bain Landau Finch[3] (born Susan Meredith Landau). Bain is of the Jewish faith.[4]

Barbara Bain has worked to further the cause of many charities, including literacy. When asked about watching daughter Juliet's career evolve, Bain told Attention Deficit Delirium: "I think it's wonderful. She wants it, she's very good at it, so she should do it. She's very gifted. I've seen her in the theater, and we've been on stage together. We did a play in Los Angeles together. It was gorgeous because I was in the wings and could watch her, and she could be in the wings and watch me. I handed her a handkerchief at the end of her big crying scene. I've never been nervous about her because she knows what she's doing, so I'm very calm when I watch her and very excited to see what she's doing. I don’t take pride because it doesn’t seem like anything that I did. It seems more exquisite pleasure, but not pride. I didn't do anything, she did it. In kindergarten she said she wanted to be a singer/dancer/actress. She does sing and did dance. She didn't mess around. She went right after what she was going to do."[5]

References

External links