Balwyn, Victoria

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Balwyn
MelbourneVictoria
Balwyn is located in Melbourne
Balwyn
Population:12,944 (2011)[1]
Postcode:3103
Coordinates:37°48′32″S 145°4′44″E / 37.80889°S 145.07889°E / -37.80889; 145.07889Coordinates: 37°48′32″S 145°4′44″E / 37.80889°S 145.07889°E / -37.80889; 145.07889
Area:5.6 km² (2.2 sq mi)
Location:10 km (6 mi) from Melbourne
LGA:City of Boroondara
State/territory electorate(s):Kew, Box Hill
Federal Division(s):Kooyong
Suburbs around Balwyn:
Kew EastBalwyn NorthMont Albert North
KewBalwynMont Albert North
Hawthorn EastCanterburyMont Albert
 
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Balwyn
MelbourneVictoria
Balwyn is located in Melbourne
Balwyn
Population:12,944 (2011)[1]
Postcode:3103
Coordinates:37°48′32″S 145°4′44″E / 37.80889°S 145.07889°E / -37.80889; 145.07889Coordinates: 37°48′32″S 145°4′44″E / 37.80889°S 145.07889°E / -37.80889; 145.07889
Area:5.6 km² (2.2 sq mi)
Location:10 km (6 mi) from Melbourne
LGA:City of Boroondara
State/territory electorate(s):Kew, Box Hill
Federal Division(s):Kooyong
Suburbs around Balwyn:
Kew EastBalwyn NorthMont Albert North
KewBalwynMont Albert North
Hawthorn EastCanterburyMont Albert

Balwyn is a suburb of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, 10 km east from Melbourne's Central Business District. Its Local Government Area is the City of Boroondara. At the 2011 Census, Balwyn had a population of 12,944.

The south west part of the suburb was excised as the suburb of Deepdene in 2010.

Balwyn in the north is separated from Balwyn North by Belmore Road, bounded in the west by Burke Road, in the south by an irregular line along Mont Albert Road, Northcote Avenue and Whitehorse Road and in the east by a line some distance to the east of Union Road.[2]

Whitehorse Road runs east-west along the ridgeline through the centre of Balwyn. Balwyn Road runs north-south from Koonung Creek Reserve (adjacent to the Eastern Freeway) to Canterbury Road. The main shopping precinct is near the intersection of these roads.

Contents

History

Balwyn was part of Henry Elgar's Special Survey of 8 square miles (21 km2) in 1841, which was subdivided into small farms and grazing runs.

In the late 1850s Andrew Murray, commercial editor and political writer for The Argus newspaper, bought land on the hill overlooking Canterbury Gardens. He named his house Balwyn from the Gaelic bal and the Saxon wyn, meaning 'the home of the vine'. Balwyn Road and the district were named after it.[3] The house was located on the site that is now part of Fintona Girls' School.

In 1868 the Balwyn Primary School was opened in Balwyn Road, about 100 metres north of Whitehorse Road. It was moved to the present site, south of Whitehorse Road, in 1880, opposite Murray's property. Balwyn's first town centre was near the intersection of Balwyn and Whitehorse Roads, containing a few shops, a blacksmith and the athenaeum or mechanics' institute. Anglican services began in 1868 and the St. Barnabas church, Balwyn Road, was opened in 1872.[4]

Balwyn Post Office first opened on 26 August 1874, in a rural area, closed in 1894, then reopened in 1920.[5] It will face a second closure on 11 February 2011 due to hardships in renewing rental agreement and relocating to nearby locations.[6]

The Outer Circle railway line, with a station at Deepdene, opened in 1891, was closed in 1893, re-opened in 1900 then finally closed to passenger traffic in 1927.

The electric tram system was extended along Cotham Road to terminate at Burke Road, Deepdene, on 30 May 1913. The line was extended along Whitehorse Road, through Balwyn to terminate at Union Road, Mont Albert, on 30 September 1916.[7]

The Balwyn Cinema, currently operated by Palace Cinemas, first opened as a single screen theatre in 1930. It was later converted into a multiplex in the 1990s, but the foyer was recently restored, uncovering the original 1930's tiled floor. It currently also serves as the head office of Palace Cinemas.[8]

The suburb developed in the post World War II boom and was populated by a mixture of professional and working-class families, although it is now primarily populated by wealthy migrants and its status as a recently affluent suburb has seen middle to upper-middle-class families from suburbs like Kew and Brighton transfer to the area to take advantage of large block sizes and non heritage listed houses that can be demolished for spacious modern houses. Consequently, higher real estate prices have formed a prominent part of the psycho-social makeup of Balwyn's inhabitants. The initial boom occurred along the Whitehorse Road tramline, which defined the working class Deepdene factory (such as the Wade handbag and the Jarvis-Walker fishing rod factories) and shop strip and the Balwyn shops, around the intersection with Burke Road. South of the tramline was generally petty bourgeoisie, while the slopes down to the north was populated by aspiring middle classes, workers and frugal professionals such as teachers and bank managers. With Deepdene State School at its western extreme, it drew a mixed student population that contrasted with the student population of Balwyn High School, located in the area that became known as North Balwyn, which was populated later than the rest of the suburb by a higher socio-economic group.

Apart from the significant religious establishments of the suburb, local, almost village churches, sprang up with the boom of young people post war, one example of which was the Deepdene Methodist Church. Now defunct, the church was a thriving focus for young people's fellowship, a scout troop, fund-raising as well as mothers' and other groups that defined a viable neighbourhood. In addition to its social function in nurturing the development of young people, given the opportunities of a scholastically elite school, an ever expanding employment market and the excellent public health regime of the era, the church was adopted by the Rev Dr A. H. Wood upon his retirement as Principal of the Methodist Ladies' College in Kew. Wood made an indelible contribution to the suburb through this role, and the effect remains evident in the 2000s in the lives of people he influenced at that time.[citation needed]

Today

Balwyn is also home to the exquisite Maranoa Gardens, a native garden developed by citizens. The suburb has been immortalised by the Skyhooks single named after the suburb, 'Balwyn Calling', while The Age newspaper described the suburb as "arguably Melbourne's most loved" whilst conceding "Balwyn has never, and will never, be called "a vibrant, exciting and influential suburb".[9]

Sport

The suburb has an Australian Rules football team, The Balwyn Tigers, competing in the Eastern Football League.[10] ,and the Balwyn Cricket Club[11]

2008 economic crisis

Because of the economic crisis of 2008, house prices in Melbourne's private school belt were hammered in the second half of 2008. The price of an average house in Balwyn dived 21.6 per cent, to $956,000, over the three months to the end of December 2008. By comparison, median house prices across all Melbourne suburbs fell by 9.7 per cent in the year ending 2008.[12]

Falling share prices forced many wealthy home owners in Melbourne's prestigious suburbs to sell their homes to cover share margin calls or because they had lost their jobs in the finance and banking sectors. According to one analyst, property prices in Melbourne's wealthy inner-city suburbs tend to be very closely aligned to the state of global and domestic share markets.[13][14]

Notable residents

See also

References

  1. ^ Australian Bureau of Statistics (31 October 2012). "Balwyn (State Suburb)". 2011 Census QuickStats. http://www.censusdata.abs.gov.au/census_services/getproduct/census/2011/quickstat/SSC20066?opendocument&navpos=220. Retrieved 2012-07-18.
  2. ^ Land Victoria, Locality Names and Boundaries (Maps by Municipality), archived from the original on 22 July 2008, http://web.archive.org/web/20080722075635/http://www.land.vic.gov.au/land/lcnlc2.nsf/LinkView/5068301BBA359BA04A25688E0000B327960B73AE58FA5B3BCA256E4C00187954, retrieved 2009-03-17
  3. ^ Camfield, D., "Murray, Andrew (1813 - 1880)", Australian Dictionary of Biography, Online Edition, Australian National University, http://www.adb.online.anu.edu.au/biogs/A050364b.htm, retrieved 2010-09-16
  4. ^ Balwyn & Balwyn North, Victoria, archived from the original on 2004-10-13, http://web.archive.org/web/20041013061613/http://www.arts.monash.edu.au/ncas/multimedia/gazetteer/list/balwyn.html, retrieved 2010-09-16
  5. ^ Premier Postal History, Post Office List, https://www.premierpostal.com/cgi-bin/wsProd.sh/Viewpocdwrapper.p?SortBy=VIC&country=, retrieved 2008-04-11
  6. ^ Balwyn Post Office Closure, http://twitpic.com/3sxcvh, retrieved 2011-01-24
  7. ^ "1911 - 1920", 100 Years of Electric Trams - Tram History - Milestones (Yarra Trams), http://www.yarratrams.com.au/desktopdefault.aspx/tabid-155/173_read-883, retrieved 2010-09-16
  8. ^ "Balwyn Cinema", Cinema History Around The World (Cinematour), http://www.cinematour.com/tour/au/49.html, retrieved 2012-03-11
  9. ^ Dubecki, Larissa (21 February 2008), "Balwyn Sailing", The Age (Melbourne), http://www.theage.com.au/news/in-depth/balwyn-mauling/2008/02/20/1203467173800.html, retrieved 2008-03-03
  10. ^ Full Point Footy, Eastern Football League, http://www.fullpointsfooty.net/eastern_football_league.htm, retrieved 2008-10-21
  11. ^ . Balwyn Cricket Club, archived from the original on 21 October 2010, http://balwyn.cricketvictoria.com.au/, retrieved 2010-09-19
  12. ^ "Melbourne's house prices plunge". 2009-01-31. http://www.news.com.au/heraldsun/story/0,,24985499-2862,00.html.[dead link]
  13. ^ Klan, Anthony (2008-11-06). "House prices fall in top suburbs". http://www.news.com.au/business/money/story/0,25479,24610167-5013951,00.html.
  14. ^ "Mansions go begging as wealthy dump luxury homes". 2008-11-22. http://www.news.com.au/heraldsun/story/0,27574,24687882-2862,00.html.[dead link]
  15. ^ Sharwood, Anthony (2009-10-24). "Under the radar". The Weekend Australian Magazine: pp. 14–20. Archived from the original on 26 October 2009. http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/story/0,25197,26249462-5012694,00.html. Retrieved 2009-10-25.
  16. ^ http://museumvictoria.com.au/collections/items/405610/pocket-watch-mcbean-melbourne-circa-1875

External links