Bacon sandwich

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Bacon sandwich
Half a bacon sandwich.jpg
A bacon sandwich
Alternative names
Bacon butty, bacon sarnie, rasher sandwich, bacon sanger, piece 'n bacon, bacon cob
Place of origin
United Kingdom
Serving temperature
Hot
Main ingredients
Bread, bacon, often ketchup or brown sauce
VariationsBLT
Cookbook:Bacon sandwich  Bacon sandwich
 
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Bacon sandwich
Half a bacon sandwich.jpg
A bacon sandwich
Alternative names
Bacon butty, bacon sarnie, rasher sandwich, bacon sanger, piece 'n bacon, bacon cob
Place of origin
United Kingdom
Serving temperature
Hot
Main ingredients
Bread, bacon, often ketchup or brown sauce
VariationsBLT
Cookbook:Bacon sandwich  Bacon sandwich

A bacon sandwich (also known in parts of the United Kingdom and New Zealand as a bacon butty or bacon sarnie, in Ireland as a rasher sandwich[1] and as a bacon sanger in Australia and parts of Scotland) is a sandwich of cooked bacon between bread that is usually spread with butter or margarine, and may be seasoned with ketchup or brown sauce. It is generally served hot. The BLT[2] is a popular variant of the bacon sandwich with the additional ingredients of lettuce and tomato, but served cold.

Bacon sandwiches are an all-day favourite throughout the United Kingdom. They are often served in greasy spoons, and are anecdotally recommended as a hangover cure.[3] Australian hamburger shops sell a bacon sandwich,[citation needed] which is made much like a traditional Australian hamburger with fried bacon, fried onions, lettuce, tomato, tinned beetroot and barbecue sauce or tomato sauce. In some establishments the sandwich will be made from bread toasted on only one side, while other establishments serve it on the same roll as is used for hamburgers. In Toronto, Canada, peameal bacon[4] served on a kaiser roll is a popular version of the sandwich.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Blog, Tog. "The Rasher sandwich...". Togblog. Retrieved 2 September 2012. 
  2. ^ Timeline, Food. "Food Timeline FAQs: sandwiches". http://www.foodtimeline.org. Retrieved 2 September 2012. 
  3. ^ "Bacon sandwich really does cure a hangover". The Daily Telegraph. 7 April 2009. Retrieved 29 April 2013. 
  4. ^ Champion, Luke. "The Best Peameal Bacon Sandwiches in Toronto". http://www.blogto.com. Retrieved 2 September 2012. 

External links[edit]