Axial skeleton

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Axial skeleton
Axial skeleton diagram.svg
Diagram of the axial skeleton
LatinSkeleton axiale
 
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Axial skeleton
Axial skeleton diagram.svg
Diagram of the axial skeleton
LatinSkeleton axiale
Illustration depicting anterior and posterior view of axial skeleton

The axial skeleton consists of the bones along the central axis of an organism. In humans, it consists of 80 bones and is composed of six parts; the skull bones, the ossicles of the middle ear, the hyoid bone of the throat, the rib cage, sternum and the vertebral column. The axial skeleton along with the appendicular skeleton together form the complete skeleton.

Overview[edit source | edit]

Flat bones house the brain, spinal cord, and other vital organs. This article mainly deals with the axial skeletons of humans; however, it is important to understand the evolutionary lineage of the axial skeleton. The human axial skeleton consists of 80 different bones. It is the midial core of the body and connects the pelvis to the body, where the appendix skeleton attaches. As the skeleton grows older the bones get weaker with the exception of the skull. The skull remains strong to protect the brain from injury.

Etymology[edit source | edit]

The word "Axial" is taken from the word "axis" and refers to the fact that the bones are located close to or along the central "axis" of the body.[1]

Skull[edit source | edit]

Skull (22)

Auditory Ossicles[edit source | edit]

Ossicles (6 )

Hyoid bone[edit source | edit]

Hyoid bone (1) U-shape bone located in the neck. It anchors the tongue and is associated with swallowing.

Vertebral column[edit source | edit]

Vertebral Column (26)

Chest[edit source | edit]

Thoracic cage (25)

See also[edit source | edit]

References[edit source | edit]

  1. ^ "Axial skeleton". AnatomyExpert. Retrieved 15 March 2013. 

External links[edit source | edit]