Aussie

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - View original article

 
Jump to: navigation, search
This article is about the slang word for an Australian. For the Australian dollar also known as the "Aussie Dollar" or sometimes just "The Aussie", see Australian dollar. For other uses, see Aussie (disambiguation).

Aussie is Australian slang for Australian and less commonly, Australia.[1][2][3][4] Aussie can be used in the form of an adjective, noun, or proper noun.

Pronunciation[edit]

In Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Canada, United Kingdom, and Ireland, the word is pronounced /ˈɒzi/ OZ-ee (Australian English [ˈɔzi]), with a /z/ sound;[2] however, in the United States, it is most often pronounced /ˈɔːsi/ AW-see with an /s/ sound.[5][6][7] Pronouncing the word with an /s/ in place of the /z/ is considered by Australians to be a canonically American error – similar to pronouncing the last syllables of Melbourne and Brisbane as "born" and "bane", respectively, rather than with a reduced vowel.

Ethnic usage[edit]

Aussie is used defensively by some Australians as a term of identification for people of the traditional cultural group (of Anglo-Celtic descent).[8]

Chants[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ihaka, James (15 August 2013). "Going to Aussie? Think agai". The New Zealand Herald. Retrieved 14 May 2013. 
  2. ^ a b Macquarie Dictionary 5th Edition. Macmillan Publishers Australia. 2010. ISBN 9781876429669. 
  3. ^ http://www.smh.com.au/business/cmon-aussie-cricket-anthem-reprised-to-get-bums-on-seats-20091126-jum2.html#ixzz2pZNyvOwR
  4. ^ Kennett, Jeff (11 November 2011). "C'mon Aussie, let's grow up". Herald Sun. Retrieved 22 February 2014. 
  5. ^ Webster's Third New International Dictionary, Merriam-Webster Inc., 1961 (repr. 2002).
  6. ^ MSN Encarta Dictionary, North American edition. [1] Retrieved on 7 June 2007. Archived 2009-10-31.
  7. ^ Webster's New World College Dictionary, Wiley, 2004.
  8. ^ Hirst, John (2005). Sense and Nonsense in Australian History. Black Inc. Agenda. pp. 11–13. ISBN 0-9750769-9-X. 
  9. ^ Miracle Down Under: How New Zealand Farmers Prosper without Subsidies or Protection Center For Free Trade Studies Bulletin, retrieved 13 October 2008