Auditory illusion

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An auditory illusion is an illusion of hearing, the aural equivalent of an optical illusion: the listener hears either sounds which are not present in the stimulus, or "impossible" sounds.[1] In short, auditory illusions highlight areas where the human ear and brain, as organic, makeshift tools, differ from perfect audio receptors (for better or for worse).

Examples of auditory illusions:

According to Purwins,[2] p. 110-120, auditory illusions have been used effectively by various composers, e.g. Beethoven (Leonore), Berg (Wozzek), Krenek (Spiritus Intelligentiae Sanctus), Ligeti (Piano etudes, Violin Concerto, Doppelkonzert für Flöte, Oboe und Orchester), Honegger (Pazific), Stahnke (Partota), Reutter (The Shephard’s Flute from Orchestral Set No. 1).

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Massaro, Dominic W., ed. (2007). "What Are Musical Paradox and Illusion?". American Journal of Psychology (University of California, Santa Cruz) 120 (1): 124, 132. Retrieved 15 November 2013. 
  2. ^ Purwins, Hendrik (2005). Profiles of pitch classes circularity of relative pitch and key-experiments, models, computational music analysis, and perspectives. 

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