Atlah Worldwide Church

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Atlah Worldwide Church
Atlah Worldwide Missionary Church
Location38 West 123rd Street
Harlem, New York, NY, 10027
Country United States
DenominationIndependent
Previous denominationBaptist
Membership600 (2007) [1]
100 (2011) estimated [2]
History
Former name(s)Bethelite Community Baptist Church
FoundedJune 10, 1957 (1957-06-10)
Founder(s)Millard Alexander Stanley
EventsMother Keturah Breakfast Program
[3] C.I.A. Columbia Obama Sedition And Treason Trial 2010 [4]
"No Dew! No Rain!" [1]
Architecture
Designated1888-89
Architect(s)Lamb & Rich[5]
Architectural typeClub
StyleQueen Anne
Specifications
Materialsred brick and terra cotta
Clergy
Senior pastor(s)James David Manning
 
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Atlah Worldwide Church
Atlah Worldwide Missionary Church
Location38 West 123rd Street
Harlem, New York, NY, 10027
Country United States
DenominationIndependent
Previous denominationBaptist
Membership600 (2007) [1]
100 (2011) estimated [2]
History
Former name(s)Bethelite Community Baptist Church
FoundedJune 10, 1957 (1957-06-10)
Founder(s)Millard Alexander Stanley
EventsMother Keturah Breakfast Program
[3] C.I.A. Columbia Obama Sedition And Treason Trial 2010 [4]
"No Dew! No Rain!" [1]
Architecture
Designated1888-89
Architect(s)Lamb & Rich[5]
Architectural typeClub
StyleQueen Anne
Specifications
Materialsred brick and terra cotta
Clergy
Senior pastor(s)James David Manning

Atlah Worldwide Missionary Church is a Christian church and ministry located in Harlem, New York, USA. The church is led by Dr. James David Manning who is the chief pastor.[6] The church campus is the site of the ATLAH Theological Seminary, where classes are offered on preaching and prophecy. The church is also the home of the Manning Report.

History[edit source | edit]

Atlah Worldwide Church was founded and organized in Harlem on June 6, 1957, by Reverend Millard Alexander Stanley as the Bethelite Community Baptist Church.[6]

In early June, just a few days before the first worship service was held, Pastor Stanley was sitting out before a storefront on 8th Avenue in Harlem. A local heroin drug addict spoke to him and said," If y’all gonna be a church, you better; "Be-The-Lite." Thus, the mission was formed in the statement and the name, Bethelite.[6]

In 1981, Pastor James David Manning replaced Stanley as chief pastor. Under Manning's leadership, the church name changed to ATLAH and ministries where established.[James David Manning Bio 1]

Newest Ministries – The Temple Hour of Prayer 29 May 2008; and The Manning Report 25 August 2008.[James David Manning Bio 1]

Father Divine (c.1876-1965) and his International Peace Mission Movement where located in this edifice during the 1930's. [7]

ATLAH Worldwide Church in the center of view from the northwest corner of 124th Street looking Southward....
ATLAH Worldwide Church seen from the corner of West 124th street and Lenox Avenue, Harlem.

Atlah Worldwide Church staff[edit source | edit]

References[edit source | edit]

  1. ^ a b Mara Altman (3). "Do the Dew: Prophet Loss in Harlem". The Village Voice. Retrieved 22 November 2012. 
  2. ^ FEENEY, MICHAEL J. (25). "Harlem pastor James David Manning preaches 'Obama is Evil' on church signs, angering local residents". New York Daily News. Retrieved 26 November 2012. 
  3. ^ "Mother Keturah Breakfast Program Today". ATLAH Media Network. 18. Retrieved 22 November 2012. 
  4. ^ David Weigel (12). "Obama On Trial". http://washingtonindependent.com/79095/obama-on-trial. Retrieved 22 November 2012. 
  5. ^ "Bethelite Community Baptist Church originally the Harlem Club". New York Architecture. Retrieved 21 November 2012. 
  6. ^ a b c "Our Mission Statement". 01. Retrieved 21 November 2012. 
  7. ^ From Abyssinian to Zion: A Guide to Manhattan's Houses of Worship (illustrated ed.). Columbia University Press. 2004. p. 124. 
  1. ^ a b "Pastor James David Manning BIO". ATLAH Media Network. 02. Retrieved 22 November 2012. 
  1. ^ "Elder Elizabeth Sarah Manning BIO". ATLAH Media Network. 02. Retrieved 22 November 2012. 

External links[edit source | edit]

Coordinates: 40°48′23″N 73°56′46″W / 40.80626°N 73.94618°W / 40.80626; -73.94618