Assemblage (art)

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Robert Rauschenberg, Canyon, 1959, Assemblage: oil, housepaint, pencil, paper, fabric, metal, buttons, nails, cardboard, printed paper, photographs, wood, paint tubes, mirror string, pillow & bald eagle on canvas, National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC.

Assemblage is an artistic process. In the visual arts, it consists of making three-dimensional or two-dimensional artistic compositions by putting together found objects. [1][2] In literature, assemblage refers to a text "built primarily and explicitly from existing texts in order to solve a writing or communication problem in a new context".[3] The origin of the artform dates to the cubist constructions of Pablo Picasso c. 1912-1914.[4] The origin of the word (in its artistic sense) can be traced back to the early 1950s, when Jean Dubuffet created a series of collages of butterfly wings, which he titled assemblages d'empreintes. However, both Marcel Duchamp and Pablo Picasso had been working with found objects for many years prior to Dubuffet. They were not alone. Russian artist Vladimir Tatlin creates his "counter-reliefs" in the middle of 1910s. Alongside Tatlin, the earliest woman artist to try her hand at assemblage was Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven, the Dada Baroness. In addition, one of the earliest and most prolific was Louise Nevelson, who began creating her sculptures from found pieces of wood in the late 1930s.

In 1961, the exhibition "The Art of Assemblage" was featured at the New York Museum of Modern Art. The exhibition showcased the work of early 20th-century European artists such as Braque, Dubuffet, Marcel Duchamp, Picasso, and Kurt Schwitters alongside Americans Man Ray, Joseph Cornell, Robert Mallary and Robert Rauschenberg, and also included less well known American West Coast assemblage artists such as George Herms, Bruce Conner and Edward Kienholz. William C Seitz, the curator of the exhibition, described assemblages as being made up of preformed natural or manufactured materials, objects, or fragments not intended as art materials.[5]

Artists primarily known for assemblage[edit]

Johann Dieter Wassmann (Jeff Wassmann), Vorwarts! (Go Forward!), 1897 (2003).

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Walker, John. (1992) "Assemblage Art". Glossary of Art, Architecture & Design since 1945, 3rd. ed. Retrieved February 7, 2012.
  2. ^ About.com art history Retrieved March 30, 2011
  3. ^ Selber and Johnson-Eilola, Plagiarism, Originality, Assemblage, Computers and Composition, Vol. 24, No. 4. (2007), pp. 375-403
  4. ^ The Guitar, MoMA
  5. ^ William C. Seitz, The Art of Assemblage, Doubleday (1962)
  6. ^ Deborah Solomon, Utopia Parkway: The Life and Work of Joseph Cornell, New York: Farrar, Straus & Giroux (1997).
  7. ^ Kienholz: 11 + 11 Tableaux, Moderna Museet, Stockholm, Sweden, n.d.
  8. ^ http://www.aaa.si.edu/collections/janice-lowry-papers-13665
  9. ^ Galerie Gambit Panphlet, Drury, Richard. (2000)
  10. ^ Biographical Note, The Louise Nevelson Papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
  11. ^ Wieland Schmied and Daniel Spoerri, Daniel Spoerri: Coincidence as Master = Le Hasard comme maître = Der Zufall als Meister = Il caso come maestro, Bielefeld, Germany, 2003 at p. 10.
  12. ^ Ashley Crawford, Hoax most perfect, Melbourne Age, October 11, 2003 [1]

Further reading[edit]