Amy Dickinson

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Amy Dickinson
Amy on Street.jpg
Dickinson in Chicago (2008)
BornNovember 6, 1959
Freeville, New York US
OccupationAuthor
journalist
Years active1980-present
ChildrenEmily Mason
 
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Amy Dickinson
Amy on Street.jpg
Dickinson in Chicago (2008)
BornNovember 6, 1959
Freeville, New York US
OccupationAuthor
journalist
Years active1980-present
ChildrenEmily Mason

Amy Dickinson (born November 6, 1959 in Freeville, New York)[1] is an American newspaper columnist who writes the syndicated advice column, Ask Amy.

Dickinson has appeared as a social commentator on ABC's Good Morning America.

Biography[edit]

Dickinson was born and raised on a small dairy farm in Freeville, New York. She graduated from Georgetown University. She married Anthony Mason, a CBS News correspondent, in 1986. They moved to London in 1987. A daughter, Emily, was born there in 1988. The couple divorced in 1990.

Dickinson married Bruno Schickel, a builder from Dryden, New York, on August 16, 2008.[2]

Career[edit]

Dickinson has worked as a producer for NBC News. Her articles have appeared in such publications as The Washington Post, Esquire, and O. She wrote a column on family issues for Time, and produced a weekly column for AOL's News channels, drawing on her experiences as a single parent and member of a large, extended family.

Dickinson succeeded Ann Landers (Esther Pauline "Eppie" Lederer) as the Chicago Tribune's signature advice columnist.[3] Tribune Media Services syndicates Ask Amy to newspapers around the world.

Dickinson is a frequent panelist on the radio game show Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me! that is distributed by National Public Radio, and is a regular featured guest on Talk of the Nation.

On February 9, 2009, Dickinson's memoir, The Mighty Queens of Freeville: A Mother, a Daughter, and the Town That Raised Them, was released by Hyperion Books. It reached The New York Times bestseller list in two weeks, debuting at number 16.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Dickinson, Amy". Current Biography. April 2004. 
  2. ^ "Amy Dickinson and Bruno Schickel". New York Times. 19 August 2008. 
  3. ^ "'Ann Landers' May Write Again". New York Times. 2 February 2003. 

External links[edit]