Arvell Jones

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Arvell Jones
Arvell Jones 03 cropped.jpg
Arvell Jones, October 2011
BornArvell Malcolm Jones
September 5
NationalityAmerican
Area(s)Penciller
Notable works
All-Star Squadron
 
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Arvell Jones
Arvell Jones 03 cropped.jpg
Arvell Jones, October 2011
BornArvell Malcolm Jones
September 5
NationalityAmerican
Area(s)Penciller
Notable works
All-Star Squadron

Arvell Jones (whose earliest work is billed Arvell Malcolm Jones) (born September 5)[1] is an American comic book illustrator best known for his work for Marvel Comics, and for DC Comics and its imprint Milestone Media.

Biography[edit]

Arvell Jones and his brother Desmond Jones were raised in Detroit, Michigan, and were an active in early comic book fandom.[2] Along with fellow Detroiters and future comics professionals Rich Buckler, Tom Orzechowski, Keith Pollard, Jim Starlin, Al Milgrom, Michael Netzer, and others, Jones worked on the Detroit Triple Fan Fair,[2] one of the earliest comic book conventions, and published the fanzine Fan Informer from 5729 Cadillac Street in Detroit; it lasted through at least issue #30 (1971).[3] Jones in 2006 recalled how he and his compatriots "would take a 13-hour drive and spend the night with Al Milgrom and his roommate, hang at Rich [Buckler]'s, then go see [art director] John Romita at Marvel [Comics], get our butts spanked, and go back to Detroit to work on our samples again."[2]

He broke into the comics industry as art assistant for Buckler, the first of the Detroit group to enter the field professionally.[2] After helping him on Marvel features starring the superhero the Black Panther and the Buckler-created cyborg antihero Deathlok, Jones received his first published credit, for pencil-art assistance, alongside Pollard, on the Buckler-drawn Thor #228 (cover-dated Oct. 1974). He then did pencil "breakdowns"—layouts that break down the plot elements—for all but page one of the 18-page team-up story "The Return of the Living Eraser", starring the Thing and Morbius, the Living Vampire, with veteran artist Dick Giordano providing finished art.[4] This did not see publication for a year, however,[2] eventually running in Marvel Two-in-One #15 (May 1976). Following an illustration for the text story "The Atomic Monster" in the Marvel black-and-white horror-comics magazine Monsters Unleashed #9 (Dec. 1974), Jones made his full comics-art debut as penciler of an 18-page story starring the martial-artist superhero Iron Fist in Marvel Premiere #20 (Jan. 1975). He went on to do the next two Iron Fist stories in that bimonthly series.[4] At DC Comics, Jones worked with writer Gerry Conway on the Super-Team Family title which starred the Atom teaming with various other DC characters.[5] After the cancellation of Super-Team Family, a Supergirl/Doom Patrol team-up drawn by Jones originally scheduled to appear in that series was published in The Superman Family #191-193.[6]

Jones worked on the DC Comics series All-Star Squadron in the mid-1980s, penciling the majority of the issues released between 1985 and 1987. After leaving the comics field for several years to work in television,[7][8] he returned in 1994 to provide pencils on DC Comics/Milestone Media's series Kobalt and Hardware.

Bibliography[edit]

DC Comics[edit]

Milestone Media[edit]

Marvel Comics[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Miller, John Jackson (June 10, 2005). "Comics Industry Birthdays". Comics Buyer's Guide. Archived from the original on October 29, 2010. Retrieved December 12, 2010. 
  2. ^ a b c d e Arvell Jones interview. (February 22, 2006). "Standing On The Shoulders Of Giants: Arvell Jones". ComicBookResources.com. Archived from the original on February 28, 2012.  (Requires scrolldown)
  3. ^ Lent, John A. (2005). Comic Art of the United States through 2000, Animation and Cartoons: An international Bibliography. Greenwood Publishing Group (Google eBook). p. 50. 
  4. ^ a b Arvell Jones at the Grand Comics Database
  5. ^ Johnson, Dan (August 2013). "We Are (Super-Team) Family". Back Issue (TwoMorrows Publishing) (66): 8–14. 
  6. ^ Wells, John (October 24, 1997), "'Lost' DC: 1976-1980", Comics Buyer's Guide (1249): 128 
  7. ^ Jaworski, Jeff. "Arvell Jones". Comicbook-Art.com. Archived from the original on July 8, 2011. Retrieved March 18, 2009. 
  8. ^ "Arvell Jones". Lambiek Comiclopedia. May 9, 2008. Archived from the original on May 6, 2012. 

External links[edit]

Audio/video[edit]