Artur Dmitriev

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Olympic medal record
Figure skating
Competitor for the Unified Team
Gold1992 AlbertvillePairs
Competitor for  Russia
Silver1994 LillehammerPairs
Gold1998 NaganoPairs
 
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Olympic medal record
Figure skating
Competitor for the Unified Team
Gold1992 AlbertvillePairs
Competitor for  Russia
Silver1994 LillehammerPairs
Gold1998 NaganoPairs
Artur Dmitriev

Kazakova & Dmitriev in a show in 2002.
Personal information
Full nameArtur Valeryevich Dmitriev
Country represented Russia
Former country(ies) represented Soviet Union
Born(1968-01-21) January 21, 1968 (age 44)
Bila Tserkva, Ukrainian SSR
ResidenceSaint Petersburg, Russia
Height6' (183 cm)
Former partnerOksana Kazakova
Natalia Mishkutionok
Former coachTamara Moskvina
Former choreographerAlexander Matveev
David Avdish
Tamara Moskvina
Skating clubMechta, UOR 4 Moscow Gomelski (from 2012)
Yubileyny Sport Club (until 2012)
Retired1999

Artur Valeryevich Dmitriev (Russian: Артур Валерьевич Дмитриев; born 21 January 1968 in Bila Tserkva, Ukrainian SSR) is a Ukrainian-born Russian pair skater who competed internationally for the Soviet Union, the Unified Team, and Russia. He is a two-time Olympic Champion with Natalia Mishkutenok and Oksana Kazakova in 1992 and 1998 respectively, and also won Olympic silver in 1994. Along with Irina Rodnina, he is the only pair skater to win Olympic gold with two different partners.

Contents

Career

The pair of Artur Dmitriev and Natalia Mishkutenok were coached by Tamara Moskvina in Saint Petersburg. They won the gold medal at the 1992 Olympics, and the silver at the 1994 Olympics behind Ekaterina Gordeeva and Sergei Grinkov. They represented the Unified Team, the sports team of the former Soviet Union during the 1992 Olympics, but represented Russia in 1994. Mishkutenok and Dmitriev won the World Figure Skating Championships and the European Championships in 1991 and 1992. Mishkutenok decided to retire from competition in 1994.

Dmitriev wanted to continue his competitive career and found a new partner, Oksana Kazakova, in February 1995.[1][2] They were coached by Moskvina at Yubileyny Sports Palace in Saint Petersburg. Their choreographers were Alexander Matveev, David Avdish, and Moskvina.[3] Early in their partnership, Kazakova and Dmitriev missed six months when she injured her leg.[1] They won the 1996 European Championships and bronze at the 1997 World Championships. In 1998, they won the Olympic title in Nagano, Japan. This made Dmitriev the first male skater to win the pairs event twice with different partners.[1]

Despite being close competitive rivals, he was friends with both Grinkov and Sikharulidze. He helped Moskvina coach Sikharulidze even while they were competing against each other.

After retiring from competition, Dmitriev became a coach. He spent a few years coaching at Hackensack, New Jersey's Ice House.[4] Dmitriev began coaching at Yubileyny in the mid-2000s, working alongside Kazakova and Moskvina and coaching Katarina Gerboldt / Alexander Enbert among others.[5] In March 2012, Dmitriev said he would move to Moscow and coach at the UOR 4 Moscow Gomelski Academy at the Mechta rink (Russian: УОР №4 им. А.Я.Гомельского, "Мечта").[6]

Personal life

From 1992 to 2006 Dmitriev was married to Tatiana Druchinina, a former World champion in rhythmic gymnastics, who choreographed the Olympic programs of ice dancers Tatiana Navka and Roman Kostomarov, and is the choreographer for Yuko Kawaguchi and Alexander Smirnov. They have one son, Artur Jr, who is a singles skater.[7] He is remarried to an accountant, Tatiana Fedorova, with whom he has a son named Artiom.

Programs

With Mishkutenok

SeasonShort programLong programExhibition
1993–1994Don Quixote
by Ludwig Minkus
Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini
by Sergei Rachmaninov
Piano Concerto #2 ("The Symphony of Emotions")
by Sergei Rachmaninov
Flute Dance
Nostalgia
1990–1992Don Quixote
by Ludwig Minkus
The Swan
(from The Carnival of the Animals)
by Camille Saint-Saëns
Liebestraum
by Franz Liszt
Somewhere in Your Heart
by Frank Sinatra
War Drums
Peasant Dance
1988–1990Let's Dance TogetherCollection of Jewish folk musicPiano Piece ("The Death Spiral")
Peasant Dance
Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini
by Sergei Rachmaninov
War drums

With Kazakova

SeasonShort programLong programExhibition
1998–2008Caruso
performed by Luciano Pavarotti
Unforgettable
performed by Nat King Cole and Natalie Cole
Marionette
Clubbed to Death (Kurayamino variation)
from The Matrix soundtrack

by Rob Dougan
Somewhere Out There
performed by Linda Ronstadt & James Ingram
Charade
soundtrack by Henry Mancini
Le Vent, Le Cri
from Le Professionnel
soundtrack by Henry Mancini

Spente le Stelle
by Emma Shapplin
Fly Me to the Moon
by Frank Sinatra
1997–1998[8]Also sprach Zarathustra
by Richard Strauss
Passacaglia
from Suite de pièce Vol. 1 No. 7 in G minor (HWV 432)
by George Frideric Handel
Valse Triste
by Franz von Vecsey
1996–1997[8]Also sprach Zarathustra
by Richard Strauss
Passacaglia
from Suite de pièce Vol. 1 No. 7 in G minor (HWV 432)
by George Frideric Handel
La Cucaracha
Also sprach Zarathustra
by Richard Strauss
1995–1996[8]Nostalgia
by unknown
La traviata
by Giuseppe Verdi
Unknown

Competitive highlights

With Mishkutenok

Event1987–881988–891989–901990–911991–921992–931993–94
Winter Olympic Games1st2nd
World Championships3rd1st1st
European Championships4th3rd3rd1st1st3rd
Russian Championships2nd
Soviet Championships2nd2nd2nd2nd
Skate America1st1st
Nations Cup1st
Trophée Lalique1st1st
NHK Trophy3rd
Prize of Moscow News1st
Goodwill Games2nd1st
Piruetten1st
Winter Universiade1st
World Pro. Championships3rd
World Challenge of Champions3rd
US Open Pro.1st

With Kazakova

Event1995–961996–971997–98
Winter Olympic Games1st
World Championships5th3rdWD
European Championships1st2nd
Russian Championships3rd4th3rd
Grand Prix Final2nd3rd
Skate America5th1st
Skate Canada1st
Trophée Lalique2nd1st
Cup of Russia3rd
NHK TrophyWD
WD = Withdrew

References

  1. ^ a b c Glauber, Bill (February 11, 1998). "She's paired with medal stand, too; Russian Kazakova rises to partner's standard". Baltimore Sun. Archived from the original on December 23, 2011. http://articles.baltimoresun.com/1998-02-11/sports/1998042117_1_dmitriev-kazakova-1994-olympics. 
  2. ^ "Power and Passion Archives: Issue #2, October 1995". Archived from the original on February 5, 2012. http://www.webcitation.org/65EZEkW5J. 
  3. ^ "Oksana Kazakova & Artur Dmitriev". Pairs on Ice. Archived from the original on October 7, 2007. http://web.archive.org/web/20071007200616/http://www.pairsonice.net/profileview.php?pid=28. 
  4. ^ Wojdyla, Michelle (July 1, 2004). "Adult Regional Training Camp Continues to Grow". U.S. Figure Skating. http://www.usfigureskating.org/event_story.asp?id=25771. Retrieved April 23, 2011. 
  5. ^ "Katarina GERBOLDT / Alexander ENBERT: 2011/2012". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on February 5, 2012. http://www.webcitation.org/65EPiuF3k. 
  6. ^ Simonenko, Andrei (March 7, 2012). "Дмитриев переезжает тренировать фигуристов из Петербурга в Москву [Dmitriev moves from Saint Petersburg to Moscow]" (in Russian). R-Sport. Archived from the original on March 7, 2012. http://rsport.ru/figure_skating/20120307/583670576.html. 
  7. ^ "Artur Dmitriev: 2011/2012". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on February 5, 2012. http://www.webcitation.org/65EX3ShIP. 
  8. ^ a b c "Kazakova and Dmitriev's Music". Archived from the original on October 5, 1999. http://web.archive.org/web/19991005065616/http://www.geocities.com/Colosseum/Bleachers/9921/programs.htm. 

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