Arkansas Children's Hospital

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Arkansas Children's Hospital
ArkansasChildrensHospitalLogo.jpeg
ArkansasChildrensHospitalFront.jpg
Geography
LocationLittle Rock, Arkansas, United States
Coordinates34°44′36″N 92°17′29″W / 34.74327°N 92.29151°W / 34.74327; -92.29151Coordinates: 34°44′36″N 92°17′29″W / 34.74327°N 92.29151°W / 34.74327; -92.29151
Organization
Care systemPrivate
FundingNon-profit hospital
Hospital typeSpecialist
Affiliated universityUAMS College of Medicine
Services
Emergency departmentLevel I trauma center
Beds370
SpecialityPediatrics
History
Founded1912
Links
Websitehttp://www.archildrens.org/
ListsHospitals in Arkansas
 
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Arkansas Children's Hospital
ArkansasChildrensHospitalLogo.jpeg
ArkansasChildrensHospitalFront.jpg
Geography
LocationLittle Rock, Arkansas, United States
Coordinates34°44′36″N 92°17′29″W / 34.74327°N 92.29151°W / 34.74327; -92.29151Coordinates: 34°44′36″N 92°17′29″W / 34.74327°N 92.29151°W / 34.74327; -92.29151
Organization
Care systemPrivate
FundingNon-profit hospital
Hospital typeSpecialist
Affiliated universityUAMS College of Medicine
Services
Emergency departmentLevel I trauma center
Beds370
SpecialityPediatrics
History
Founded1912
Links
Websitehttp://www.archildrens.org/
ListsHospitals in Arkansas

Arkansas Children's Hospital (ACH) is a pediatric hospital and a Level I trauma center located in Little Rock, Arkansas. It is the sixth largest in the United States, serving children from birth to age twenty-one. ACH is an affiliate of the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences and serves as a teaching hospital under the UAMS College of Medicine's Department of Pediatrics.[1][2] ACH staff consists of more than 500 physicians, 80 residents, and 3,500 support staff members. The campus spans 29 city blocks and has a floor space totaling over 1,200,000 square feet (110,000 m2).[2]

First Lady of Arkansas Hillary Rodham Clinton served on the board of the Arkansas Children's Hospital Legal Services from 1988 to 1992.[3]

Services[edit]

ACH provides a comprehensive set of inpatient, outpatient, and specialty services for patients and families.[4] What follows is an overview of the most notable:

Research[edit]

Mission[edit]

The Arkansas Children's Hospital Research Institute (ACHRI) is a not-for-profit corporation owned by Arkansas Children's Hospital. ACHRI was created to provide a research environment on the ACH campus to meet the research needs of UAMS faculty. The Arkansas Children's Hospital Research Institute mission is to improve children's health, development and well being through high quality research. The vision is to become internationally recognized as a leader in pediatric biomedical research.[5]

Funding[edit]

"ACHRI research support comes from grants and contracts with federal, state, industry and private agencies and from philanthropic donations. Federal funds account for $12.7 million of ACHRI’s research support money. Of this federal support, $5.5 million is from the USDA and $5.4 million is from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Funds from the State of Arkansas total $5.5 million. State funds include support from the Arkansas Biosciences Institute, created as the major research component of the Tobacco Settlement Proceeds Act of 2000. ACHRI researchers receive the majority of these funds through grant applications and contract arrangements to support their research efforts."[6]

Programs[edit]

ACHRI houses research programs in infectious disease, endocrinology, osteogenesis, pediatric pharmacology, and the Center for Applied Research and Evaluation.[7]

National recognition[edit]

Awards[edit]

Arkansas Children's Hospital has been voted one of the United States' top 10 pediatric hospitals.[8]

The 2008 U.S. News & World Report included ACH in its ranking of top US pediatric medical facilities. Pediatricians nationwide were interviewed in order to rank hospitals on reputation, patient outcome, and care-related measures such as volume, nursing, and credentialing.[9] ACH was ranked 24th in general pediatrics and 28th in pediatric cardiovascular care and surgery.[10]

The 2008 list of "Best Doctors in America" features 99 physicians on staff at Arkansas Children's Hospital. More than 100 additional physicians included in the list were affiliated more generally with the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Health System[11]

ACH is one of the largest employers in Arkansas and Fortune magazine named the hospital in its top 100 "Best Companies to Work For" in 2008, 2009, 2010 and 2011.[12]

News[edit]

In 2007 ACH treated the case of 20-month-old Jacob Esses, which spurred the recall of the Aqua Dots toy. After swallowing a number of the toy beads, 1,4-Butanediol coating the beads was metabolized to Gamma-Hydroxybutyric Acid (GHB, a recreational anesthetic).[13][14] The drug has been shown to cause unconsciousness, drowsiness, seizures, coma, or death.[15]

ACH has been profiled a number of times on the Discovery Health Channel, perhaps most notably in the fall of 2007. The program “Surgery Saved My Life” examined how three physicians in the Arkansas Children’s Hospital Vascular Anomalies Center of Excellence handled patients’ potentially fatal vascular tumors. Featured in the documentary were James Suen, M.D., a head and neck surgeon at ACH and the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS); Lisa Buckmiller, M.D., medical director of the ACH Vascular Anomalies Center; and Rick Jackson, M.D., a surgeon at the hospital and associate professor of Surgery in the UAMS College of Medicine. One patient featured in the profile was a 12-year-old girl who was born in Shanghai with what is believed to be the largest vascular tumor ever seen; Chinese surgeons had been reluctant to operate on the tumor.[16]

Discovery Health's "Extreme Surgery" has also featured the spine surgery work of nationally-recognized Orthopedic Surgeon Dr. Richard McCarthy in addition to Dr. Buckmiller and Dr. Milton Waner.[17]


Construction and expansion[edit]

In September 2008 ACH held a groundbreaking for its new $115 million wing that eventually will allow it to care for thousands more sick children every year.[18]

"The 258,000-square-foot (24,000 m2) South Wing will open much-needed space for providing the highest standard of pediatric care possible. The new ED will include telemedicine technology and four trauma rooms, as well as a dedicated orthopedics suite and a decontamination unit. In addition, the South Wing will open new space for the NICU and CVICU to accommodate the growing demand for their services. An entirely new Hematology/Oncology unit will open in the South Wing for the state’s pediatric cancer and blood disorder patients, as will a new inpatient unit dedicated for care of infants through 3-year-olds.

The project actually will provide about 100 new patient beds, but the hospital plans to retire many that date back more than 40 years. The net increase in patient beds will be 54. The new South Wing also will include 56 new exam rooms, as well as 19 new procedural or diagnostic rooms. A roof garden complete with benches, Arkansas foliage and play areas will be open to patients, families and employees.

The South Wing will rise four stories and will be located on land that is now a parking lot just south of the main hospital and west of its Roy & Christine Sturgis Building. The finished facility will sit in the vicinity of Battery Street and 10th Street. The facility was designed by Cromwell Architects and will be built by Nabholz Construction."

Accreditation and membership[edit]

ArkansasChildrensHospitalSide.jpg

Accreditation[edit]

ACH holds accreditation with the following agencies:[19]

Membership[edit]

ACH holds membership in the following organizations:[19]

References[edit]

  1. ^ CenterWatch Clinical Trials Listing Service http://www.centerwatch.com/professional/pro1898.html
  2. ^ a b ACH Press Release - About Us http://www.archildrens.org/about/
  3. ^ "Hon. Hillary Rodham Clinton". FindLaw. Retrieved 2007-05-31. 
  4. ^ ACH Medical Services http://www.archildrens.org/medical_services/services.asp
  5. ^ http://achri.archildrens.org/about/mission.htm
  6. ^ ACHRI Funding http://achri.archildrens.org/about/funding.htm
  7. ^ ACHRI Programs http://achri.archildrens.org/about/programs.htm
  8. ^ ACH Press Release http://www.ach.uams.edu/resources/health_ekids/jul05/best_hospitals.asp
  9. ^ US News & World Report 2008 - Pediatric Ranking Methodology http://health.usnews.com/articles/health/best-childrens-hospitals/2008/05/29/behind-the-rankings.html
  10. ^ US News & World Report 2008 - Arkansas Children's Hospital http://www.usnews.com/listings/hospitals/6710340/pediatric
  11. ^ UAMS Physicians Among Best Doctors in America http://www.uams.edu/medcenter/best_doctors.asp
  12. ^ Fortune http://money.cnn.com/magazines/fortune/bestcompanies/2008/snapshots/76.html
  13. ^ International Herald Tribune http://www.iht.com/articles/ap/2007/11/08/america/NA-GEN-US-Toys-Date-Rape-Drug.php
  14. ^ USA Today http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/2007-11-09-toy-recall-chemicals_N.htm
  15. ^ US Drug Enforcement Administration http://www.usdoj.gov/dea/concern/ghb_factsheet.html
  16. ^ ACH Press Release - Discovery Health to feature ACH VACP https://secure.archildrens.org/press_room/viewPressRelease_Story.asp?PRID=5806
  17. ^ ACH Press Release - Discovery Health to Feature ACH in Three Hour Special https://secure.archildrens.org/press_room/viewPressRelease_Story.asp?PRID=2477
  18. ^ ACH Press Release - ACH Breaks Ground on $115 Million Wing http://www.archildrens.org/news/pages/press_release.aspx?articleid=2611&zoneid=34
  19. ^ a b ACH Accreditation and Membership http://www.archildrens.org/about/accreditations.asp

External links[edit]

Media related to Arkansas Children's Hospital at Wikimedia Commons