Arion Lightning

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Arion Lightning
Arion Lightning.jpg
Arion Lightning
RoleHomebuilt aircraft
National originUnited States of America
ManufacturerArion Aircraft
DesignerPete Krotje, Ben Krotje and Nick Otterback
First flightmarch 2006
Introductionapril 2006
Number built150 (2012)
 
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Arion Lightning
Arion Lightning.jpg
Arion Lightning
RoleHomebuilt aircraft
National originUnited States of America
ManufacturerArion Aircraft
DesignerPete Krotje, Ben Krotje and Nick Otterback
First flightmarch 2006
Introductionapril 2006
Number built150 (2012)

The Arion Lightning is a light-sport aircraft available as a kit aircraft or as a production Special LSA.[1]

Design and development[edit]

The Lightning was developed by designers Pete Krotje, Ben Krotje and Nick Otterback.[2]

Originally designed as a high speed, low wing composite aircraft for the Jabiru series of engines, the LS-1 was redesigned to meet American light-sport requirements by extending the wings to lower the stall speed and using a fixed pitch propeller.[citation needed]

The aircraft is made from composites. In the homebuilt kit version its 30.5 ft (9.3 m) span wing has an area of 91 sq ft (8.5 m2) and mounts flaps. The aircraft's recommended engine power is 120 hp (89 kW) and the standard engine used is the 120 hp (89 kW) Jabiru 3300 four-stroke powerplant. Construction time from the supplied kit is 600 hours.[3]

Operational history[edit]

In 2007 Earl Ferguson set a record for the quickest time for a flight from Savannah to San Diego in a piston engine land plane weighing between 1,102 and 2,205 pounds using this aircraft.[4]

Variants[edit]

Arion Lightning EXP
US Experimental amateur-built category aircraft[3]
Arion Lightning LS-1
Light-sport aircraft variant[3]

Specifications (Arion Lightning LS-1)[edit]

Data from Arion Aircraft[5]

General characteristics

Performance

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Arion Lightning LS-1". Retrieved 1 August 2011. 
  2. ^ Plane & Pilot. 9 Feb 2010. 
  3. ^ a b c Vandermeullen, Richard: 2012 Kit Aircraft Buyer's Guide, Kitplanes, Volume 28, Number 12, December 2011, page 43. Belvoir Publications. ISSN 0891-1851
  4. ^ Mosely, Brian (March 29, 2008), "A record-setting flight in a Shelbyville-made plane", Shelbyville times 
  5. ^ Arion Aircraft (2011). "Specifications and Pricing". Retrieved 27 December 2011. 

External links[edit]