Ann Kirkpatrick

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - View original article

Ann Kirkpatrick
Ann Kirkpatrick.jpg
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Arizona's 1st district
Incumbent
Assumed office
January 3, 2013
Preceded byPaul Gosar
In office
January 3, 2009 – January 3, 2011
Preceded byRick Renzi
Succeeded byPaul Gosar
Member of the Arizona House of Representatives
from the 2nd district
In office
2005–2007
Preceded bySylvia Laughter[1]
Succeeded byChristopher Clark Deschene[2]
Personal details
Born(1950-03-24) March 24, 1950 (age 63)
McNary, Arizona
Political partyDemocratic
ResidenceFlagstaff, Arizona
Alma materUniversity of Arizona
University of Arizona College of Law
ProfessionAttorney
ReligionRoman Catholic
WebsiteRepresentative Ann Kirkpatrick
 
Jump to: navigation, search
Ann Kirkpatrick
Ann Kirkpatrick.jpg
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Arizona's 1st district
Incumbent
Assumed office
January 3, 2013
Preceded byPaul Gosar
In office
January 3, 2009 – January 3, 2011
Preceded byRick Renzi
Succeeded byPaul Gosar
Member of the Arizona House of Representatives
from the 2nd district
In office
2005–2007
Preceded bySylvia Laughter[1]
Succeeded byChristopher Clark Deschene[2]
Personal details
Born(1950-03-24) March 24, 1950 (age 63)
McNary, Arizona
Political partyDemocratic
ResidenceFlagstaff, Arizona
Alma materUniversity of Arizona
University of Arizona College of Law
ProfessionAttorney
ReligionRoman Catholic
WebsiteRepresentative Ann Kirkpatrick

Ann Kirkpatrick (born March 24, 1950) is an American politician who has been the United States Representative for Arizona's 1st congressional district since 2013; previously she represented the same district from 2009 to 2011. She is a member of the Democratic Party. She earlier served in the Arizona House of Representatives. She was defeated by Republican Paul Gosar in the 2010 election. In 2012, she was again the Democratic nominee, and went on to win the general election to regain her old seat in a close race.[3]

Early life, education, family, and early political career[edit]

Kirkpatrick was born and raised on an Apache Indian reservation near McNary, Arizona.[4] She graduated from Blue Ridge High School, the University of Arizona with an undergraduate degree in social studies in 1972, and the University of Arizona College of Law with a juris doctor in 1979..[5]

In 1980 she became Coconino County’s first woman deputy county attorney, and she later served as city attorney for Sedona. She was a member of the Flagstaff Water Commission. In 2004, she taught Business Law and Ethics at Coconino Community College."[6]

Kirkpatrick is married to Roger Curley and has two children.

Political positions[edit]

Immigration[edit]

In an Oct. 24, 2008, article, the Arizona Republic reported, “[Ann] Kirkpatrick called for ‘national, comprehensive reform’ of United States immigration policy during the debate at the studio of Channel 8 (KAET) on the Tempe campus of Arizona State University. Kirkpatrick said she supports increased border patrol funding and installation of a ground-based radar system often referred to as a "smart fence." Kirkpatrick's immigration plan also included a temporary-work program and a path to citizenship for illegal aliens that would require learning English, keeping a job, and paying a fine. [7]

Healthcare[edit]

Kirkpatrick voted for the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act in March 2010.[8][9] In May 2013, she voted against repeal of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.[10]

Stimulus spending[edit]

She supported the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. She opposed the American Clean Energy and Security Act which, among other things, established a cap and trade system.[11]

Veterans benefits[edit]

On behalf of Veterans, she has proposed 7 bills and successfully passed 5 bills during her short tenure, including H.R. 2879, which closes a donut hole for terminally ill veterans service members who want to collect their life insurance, and H.R. 3553, which removes disability payments as consideration of income under means-tested housing assistance.[12]

Congressional pay[edit]

She sponsored bill H.R. 4720, Taking Responsibility for Congressional Pay Act, to lower the salaries of Congressional members.[13]

Arizona House of Representatives[edit]

Elections[edit]

In 2004, Kirkpatrick was elected to represent the 1st Legislative District and took office in January 2005. Kirkpatrick was elected to a second term in the state House in 2006. This district includes Flagstaff and the Hualapai, Havasupai, Hopi, Navajo and San Juan Southern Paiute Nations.

Committee assignments[edit]

Kirkpatrick served as the ranking Democrat on the House Ways and Means Committee, as well as the Education K-12 Committee and Natural Resources Committee.[6]

U.S. House of Representatives[edit]

Elections[edit]

2008

On July 24, 2007, Kirkpatrick resigned from the state House to run for the Democratic nomination in Arizona's 1st congressional district. The seat was due to come open after three-term Republican incumbent Rick Renzi announced that he would not seek re-election in the face of a federal indictment on corruption charges. Kirkpatrick won a four-way primary by almost 15 points on September 2, 2008.

Kirkpatrick faced Republican Sydney Ann Hay, a conservative activist, in the general election. Despite the presence of Arizona senator John McCain atop the ticket, Kirkpatrick garnered 56 percent of the vote - a higher percentage than McCain in her district. Her victory gave the Democrats a majority of the state's House delegation for the first time in over half a century.

Kirkpatrick earned endorsements from leaders in government, education, tribal communities, first responders, and other groups. Among those endorsing her were: former Arizona Governor Janet Napolitano, U.S. Representative Gabrielle Giffords, U.S. Representative Harry Mitchell, the Arizona Education Association, the Arizona Police Association, the Arizona Conference of Police and Sheriffs, the International Association of Firefighters, county sheriffs in Coconino, Gila, Graham, Greenlee, Navajo, and Pinal Counties, Navajo County School Superintendent Linda Morrow,Coconino County School Superintendent Cecilia Owen, Pinal County School Superintendent Orlenda Roberts, Navajo Nation President Joe Shirley, San Carlos Apache Tribal Chairman Wendsler Nosie, White Mountain Apache Tribal Chairman Ronnie Lupe, former Navajo Nation president Peterson Zah, and many other tribal leaders.[14] The Arizona Republic, the state's largest newspaper, and the White Mountain Independent and the Arizona Daily Sun, two of the most widely read newspapers in the district, all endorsed her candidacy.

2010

Kirkpatrick was defeated for reelection by Republican nominee Paul Gosar. She had been endorsed by the Arizona Republic,[15] the state's largest newspaper, as well as Coconino Supervisor Lena Fowler, Apache County Supervisor Tom White, Jr., Navajo County Supervisor Jesse Thompson, Apache County Superintendent Pauline Begay, Navajo Nation President Joe Shirley Jr., Arizona Conference of Police and Sheriffs, and the county sheriffs of Apache, Cononino, Gila, Greenlee, and Navajo counties.[14]

2012

Kirkpatrick announced she would run again for her old congressional seat in 2012.[16] Redistricting made the district significantly more Democratic than its predecessor; Democrats now have a nine-point registration advantage. She was initially priming for a rematch against Gosar, but Gosar opted to run for reelection in the newly created, heavily Republican 4th District.[17] Kirkpatrick eventually narrowly won the general election on November 6, 2012, defeating Republican former state Senator Jonathan Paton.[3]

Tenure[edit]

Staff bonuses[edit]

After losing her 2010 campaign, Kirkpatrick spent more than $100,000 in taxpayer funds on bonuses and vacation pay for her departing staff. Kirkpatrick also hired three former campaign aides after the election as legislative aides, paying them a combined $22,433 for less than three months of work. [18]

Committee assignments[edit]

Past[edit]

Electoral history[edit]

2008[edit]

Arizona's 1st Congressional District House Election, 2008
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
DemocraticAnn Kirkpatrick155,79155.88%
RepublicanSydney Hay109,92439.43%
IndependentBrent Maupin9,3943.37%
LibertarianThane Eichenauer3,6781.32%

2010[edit]

Arizona's 1st Congressional District House Election, 2010
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
RepublicanPaul Gosar112,81649.72%+10.29%
DemocraticAnn Kirkpatrick99,23343.73%-12.15%
LibertarianNicole Patti14,8696.55%+5.23%

2012[edit]

Arizona’s 1st congressional district election, 2012[19]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
DemocraticAnn Kirkpatrick122,77448.79%+0.91%
RepublicanJonathan Paton113,59445.14%-4.56%
LibertarianKim Allen15,2276.05%-0.45%
Turnout251,595
Democratic holdSwing

References[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ "AZ State House 02 Race - Nov 02, 2004". Our Campaigns. Retrieved 2012-12-18. 
  2. ^ "AZ State House 02 Race - Nov 07, 2006". Our Campaigns. Retrieved 2012-12-18. 
  3. ^ a b Hendley, Matthew. "Ann Kirkpatrick Called Winner in CD-1; Kyrsten Sinema and Martha McSally Sit on Leads". blogs.phoenixnewtimes.com. Phoenix New Times, LLC. Retrieved 8 November 2012. 
  4. ^ "Can Navajo Nation help rescue endangered Dem Congresswoman?". ABC News. 2010-10-08. 
  5. ^ "Ann Kirkpatrick: A Lifetime of Service and Results". Kirkpatrick for Arizona. Retrieved 2012-12-18. 
  6. ^ a b "Ann Kirkpatrick Member Page". Arizona State Legislature. Retrieved 2012-12-18. 
  7. ^ [1]
  8. ^ http://clerk.house.gov/evs/2009/roll887.xml
  9. ^ Olka. "Updating The Health Care Whip Count - Hotline On Call". Hotlineoncall.nationaljournal.com. Retrieved 2010-07-11. 
  10. ^ "Obamacare and Vulnerable Democrats". The Wall Street Journal. 20 May 2013. 
  11. ^ http://clerk.house.gov/evs/2009/roll477.xml
  12. ^ "GovTrack: Search Legislation in Congress". Govtrack.us. Retrieved 2012-12-18. 
  13. ^ Parkinson, John R. (September 17, 2010). "Congressional Pay Cut? Arizona Democrat Suggests One to Nancy Pelosi". ABC News. 
  14. ^ a b "Endorsements". Kirkpatrick for Arizona. Retrieved 2012-12-18. 
  15. ^ "Kirkpatrick's the right fit for rural district". Arizona Republic. 2010-10-03. 
  16. ^ Catanese, David; Isenstadt, Alex (March 31, 2011). "Dems eye GOP rematches for 2012". Politico. Retrieved 2012-12-18. 
  17. ^ Wilson, Reid (January 7, 2012). "Gosar Will Switch Districts". National Journal. Retrieved 2012-12-18. 
  18. ^ [2]
  19. ^ "STATE OF ARIZONA OFFICIAL CANVASS". azsos.gov. December 3, 2012. Retrieved January 4, 2013. 
Other items

External links[edit]

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Rick Renzi
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Arizona's 1st congressional district

2009–2011
Succeeded by
Paul Gosar
Preceded by
Paul Gosar
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Arizona's 1st congressional district

2013–present
Incumbent
United States order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by
Alan Grayson
D-Florida
United States Representatives by seniority
357th
Succeeded by
Dan Maffei
D-New York