Andover, New Jersey

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Andover, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Andover
Map of Andover Borough in Sussex County. Inset: Location of Sussex County in New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Andover, New Jersey.
Coordinates: 40°59′09″N 74°44′37″W / 40.985758°N 74.74359°W / 40.985758; -74.74359Coordinates: 40°59′09″N 74°44′37″W / 40.985758°N 74.74359°W / 40.985758; -74.74359[1][2]
CountryUnited States
StateNew Jersey
CountySussex
IncorporatedMarch 25, 1904
Government[5]
 • TypeBorough
 • MayorJohn A. Morgan (term ends December 31, 2015)[3]
 • ClerkBeth Brothman[4]
Area[2]
 • Total1.471 sq mi (3.810 km2)
 • Land1.452 sq mi (3.761 km2)
 • Water0.019 sq mi (0.048 km2)  1.27%
Area rank454th of 566 in state
21st of 24 in county[2]
Elevation[6]646 ft (197 m)
Population (2010)[7][8][9]
 • Total606
 • Estimate (2012[10])595
 • Rank549th of 566 in state
23rd of 24 in county[11]
 • Density417.3/sq mi (161.1/km2)
 • Density rank458th of 566 in state
10th of 24 in county[11]
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code07821[12][13]
Area code(s)862/973 Exchange: 286
FIPS code3403701330[14][2][15]
GNIS feature ID885140[16]
WebsiteNone
 
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Andover, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Andover
Map of Andover Borough in Sussex County. Inset: Location of Sussex County in New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Andover, New Jersey.
Coordinates: 40°59′09″N 74°44′37″W / 40.985758°N 74.74359°W / 40.985758; -74.74359Coordinates: 40°59′09″N 74°44′37″W / 40.985758°N 74.74359°W / 40.985758; -74.74359[1][2]
CountryUnited States
StateNew Jersey
CountySussex
IncorporatedMarch 25, 1904
Government[5]
 • TypeBorough
 • MayorJohn A. Morgan (term ends December 31, 2015)[3]
 • ClerkBeth Brothman[4]
Area[2]
 • Total1.471 sq mi (3.810 km2)
 • Land1.452 sq mi (3.761 km2)
 • Water0.019 sq mi (0.048 km2)  1.27%
Area rank454th of 566 in state
21st of 24 in county[2]
Elevation[6]646 ft (197 m)
Population (2010)[7][8][9]
 • Total606
 • Estimate (2012[10])595
 • Rank549th of 566 in state
23rd of 24 in county[11]
 • Density417.3/sq mi (161.1/km2)
 • Density rank458th of 566 in state
10th of 24 in county[11]
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code07821[12][13]
Area code(s)862/973 Exchange: 286
FIPS code3403701330[14][2][15]
GNIS feature ID885140[16]
WebsiteNone

Andover is a borough in Sussex County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 606,[7][8][9] reflecting a decline of 52 (-7.9%) from the 658 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 42 (-6.0%) from the 700 counted in the 1990 Census.[17]

Andover was incorporated as a borough by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 25, 1904, from portions of Andover Township.[18]

Geography[edit source | edit]

Andover Borough is located at 40°59′09″N 74°44′37″W / 40.985758°N 74.74359°W / 40.985758; -74.74359 (40.985758,-74.74359). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 1.471 square miles (3.810 km2), of which, 1.452 square miles (3.761 km2) of it is land and 0.019 square miles (0.048 km2) of it (1.27%) is water.[1][2]

Demographics[edit source | edit]

Historical populations
CensusPop.
1910884
1920417−52.8%
193047914.9%
19405126.9%
19505609.4%
196073431.1%
197081310.8%
19808929.7%
1990700−21.5%
2000658−6.0%
2010606−7.9%
Est. 2012595[10]−1.8%
Population sources: 1910-1920[19]
1910[20] 1910-1930[21]
1930-1990[22] 2000[23][24] 2010[7][8][9]

Census 2010[edit source | edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 606 people, 241 households, and 163.9 families residing in the borough. The population density was 417.3 inhabitants per square mile (161.1 /km2). There were 263 housing units at an average density of 181.1 per square mile (69.9 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 91.75% (556) White, 1.16% (7) Black or African American, 0.33% (2) Native American, 2.15% (13) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 2.64% (16) from other races, and 1.98% (12) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 7.59% (46) of the population.[7]

There were 241 households of which 28.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.6% were married couples living together, 12.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.0% were non-families. 22.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.51 and the average family size was 2.91.[7]

In the borough, 21.1% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.6% from 18 to 24, 28.7% from 25 to 44, 30.5% from 45 to 64, and 12.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40.4 years. For every 100 females there were 99.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.8 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $67,000 (with a margin of error of +/- $20,882) and the median family income was $78,889 (+/- $19,386). Males had a median income of $54,583 (+/- $21,861) versus $41,667 (+/- $24,816) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $34,262 (+/- $7,656). About 6.7% of families and 12.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 21.3% of those under age 18 and 0.0% of those age 65 or over.[25]

Census 2000[edit source | edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[14] there were 658 people, 261 households, and 180 families residing in the borough. The population density was 451.9 people per square mile (174.0/km2). There were 273 housing units at an average density of 187.5 per square mile (72.2/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 92.71% White, 2.28% African American, 0.76% Native American, 2.28% Asian, 0.15% Pacific Islander, 1.22% from other races, and 0.61% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.58% of the population.[23][24]

There were 261 households out of which 29.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.6% were married couples living together, 14.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.7% were non-families. 24.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 2.98.[23][24]

In the borough the population was spread out with 21.7% under the age of 18, 7.6% from 18 to 24, 35.3% from 25 to 44, 25.5% from 45 to 64, and 9.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 103.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.8 males.[23][24]

The median income for a household in the borough was $60,000, and the median income for a family was $69,688. Males had a median income of $38,056 versus $30,950 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $25,914. None of the families and 2.8% of the population were living below the poverty line, including no under eighteens and 9.1% of those over 64.[23][24]

Government[edit source | edit]

Local government[edit source | edit]

Andover is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The government consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at large. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year.[5]

As of 2013, the Mayor of Andover Borough is John A. Morgan (D, term ends December 31, 2015). Members of the Borough Council are Eskil S. Danielson (R, 2014), Lynn Delfing (R, 2014), Mel Dennison (R, 2015), Keith Harris (R, 2013; serving the one-year unexpired term of Douglas Mooney), Peter Pearson (D, 2013) and Robert Smith (R, 2015).[4][26][27][28]

Federal, state and county representation[edit source | edit]

Andover Borough is located in the 5th Congressional district[29] and is part of New Jersey's 24th state legislative district.[8][30][31]

New Jersey's Fifth Congressional District is represented by Scott Garrett (R, Wantage Township).[32] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[33][34] Following the death of Frank Lautenberg on June 3, 2013, Governor Chris Christie named New Jersey Attorney General Jeffrey Chiesa (R, Branchburg) to fill the vacant seat on an interim basis from June 10 until an October special election is held to fill the balance of Lautenberg's term.[35]

The 24th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Steve Oroho (R, Franklin) and in the General Assembly by Alison Littell McHose (R, Franklin) and Parker Space (R, Wantage Township).[36] Space took office in March 2013, filling the seat vacated by Gary R. Chiusano, who had been chosen to fill a vacancy as Sussex County Surrogate.[37] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[38] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[39]

Sussex County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders whose five members are elected at-large on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects a Freeholder Director and Deputy Director from among its members, with day-to-day supervision of the operation of the county delegated to a County Administrator.[40] As of 2013, Sussex County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Richard Vohden (R, Green Township, 2013),[41] Deputy Director Phillip R. Crabb (R, Franklin, 2014),[42] George Graham (R, Stanhope, 2013),[43] Dennis J. Mudrick (R, Sparta Township, 2015)[44] and Gail Phoebus (R, Andover Township, 2015).[45][40] Graham was chosen in April 2013 to fill the seat vacated by Parker Space, who had been chosen to fill a vacancy in the New Jersey General Assembly.[37] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Jeff Parrott,[46] Sheriff Michael F. Strada[47] and Surrogate Gary R. Chiusano (R, filling the vacancy after the resignation of Nancy Fitzgibbons).[48][37] The County Administrator is John Eskilson[49]

Politics[edit source | edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 403 registered voters in Andover, of which 109 (27.0% vs. 16.5% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 152 (37.7% vs. 39.3%) were registered as Republicans and 142 (35.2% vs. 44.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were no voters registered to other parties.[50] Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 66.5% (vs. 65.8% in Sussex County) were registered to vote, including 84.3% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 86.5% countywide).[50][51]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 143 votes here (50.9% vs. 59.4% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 129 votes (45.9% vs. 38.2%) and other candidates with 8 votes (2.8% vs. 2.1%), among the 281 ballots cast by the borough's 400 registered voters, for a turnout of 70.3% (vs. 68.3% in Sussex County).[52] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 139 votes here (49.5% vs. 59.2% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 139 votes (49.5% vs. 38.7%) and other candidates with 2 votes (0.7% vs. 1.5%), among the 281 ballots cast by the borough's 404 registered voters, for a turnout of 69.6% (vs. 76.9% in Sussex County).[53] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 171 votes here (55.5% vs. 63.9% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 134 votes (43.5% vs. 34.4%) and other candidates with one vote (0.3% vs. 1.3%), among the 308 ballots cast by the borough's 421 registered voters, for a turnout of 73.2% (vs. 77.7% in the whole county).[54]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 117 votes here (58.8% vs. 63.3% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 61 votes (30.7% vs. 25.7%), Independent Chris Daggett with 18 votes (9.0% vs. 9.1%) and other candidates with 2 votes (1.0% vs. 1.3%), among the 199 ballots cast by the borough's 386 registered voters, yielding a 51.6% turnout (vs. 52.3% in the county).[55]

Education[edit source | edit]

Public school students in Kindergarten through eighth grade attend the Andover Regional School District, together with students from Andover Township. Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[56]) are Florence M. Burd Elementary School[57] (Grades K-4, 330 students) and Long Pond Middle School[58] (Grades 5-8, 311 students).[59][60]

Public school students in grades 9 - 12 attend Newton High School in Newton, together with students from Andover Township and Green Township, as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the Newton Public School District.[61][62]

Transportation[edit source | edit]

U.S. Route 206 and County Route 517 pass through the borough. Aeroflex-Andover Airport is located 2 miles (3.2 km) north of the central business district and Trinca Airport, 3 miles (4.8 km) southwest.

As part of restoring the Lackawanna Cut-Off, funding has been given to rebuild a stretch of railroad to a new station in Andover.[63]

Notable people[edit source | edit]

Notable current and former residents of Andover include:

References[edit source | edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011. 
  2. ^ a b c d e Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 26, 2012.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ a b Andover Borough, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed February 18, 2013. Source shows Arthur Copcutt, Deborah McGowan and Robert Smith on council with term-end years of 2012.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 110.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Andover, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 4, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Andover borough, Sussex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 18, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 10. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Andover borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed February 18, 2013.
  10. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 11, 2012.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Andover, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed February 18, 2013.
  13. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 23, 2013.
  14. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 31, 2008. 
  15. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed October 26, 2012.
  16. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. October 25, 2007. Retrieved January 31, 2008. 
  17. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed February 18, 2013.
  18. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 230. Accessed October 25, 2012.
  19. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed August 23, 2013.
  20. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 338. Accessed February 18, 2013.
  21. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 719. Accessed February 18, 2013.
  22. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed February 18, 2013.
  23. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Andover borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 18, 2013.
  24. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Andover borough, Sussex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 18, 2013.
  25. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Andover borough, Sussex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 18, 2013.
  26. ^ County Election Summary - General election November 2, 2010, Sussex County, New Jersey Clerk, run date November 8, 2010. Accessed February 18, 2013.
  27. ^ Summary Report - Group detail / General Election November 8, 2011, Sussex County, New Jersey Clerk, run date November 10, 2011. Accessed February 18, 2013.
  28. ^ County Summary With Detail - General Election: November 6, 2012, Sussex County, New Jersey Clerk, run date November 30, 2012. Accessed February 18, 2013.
  29. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  30. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 54, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  31. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  32. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  33. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey, United States Senate. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  34. ^ Biography, Bob Menendez. Accessed June 6, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  35. ^ Santora, Marc; and Zernike, Kate. "Attorney General of New Jersey Named as Interim Senator", The New York Times, June 6, 2013. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  36. ^ Legislative Roster 2012-2013 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed April 25, 2013.
  37. ^ a b c Miller, Jennifer Jean. "George Graham Chosen as Freeholder at Sussex County Republican Convention", TheAlternativePress.com, April 13, 2013. Accessed April 25, 2013. "Graham will fill the freeholder seat that New Jersey Assemblyman Parker Space left to take his new position. Space recently took the seat, which formerly belonged to Gary Chiusano, who in turn, was appointed to the spot of Sussex County Surrogate, following the retirement of Surrogate Nancy Fitzgibbons."
  38. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  39. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  40. ^ a b Sussex County Board of Chosen Freeholders, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed April 25, 2013.
  41. ^ Richard A. Vohden, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 10, 2013.
  42. ^ Phillip R. Crabb, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 10, 2013.
  43. ^ George Graham, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed April 25, 2013.
  44. ^ Dennis J. Mudrick, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 10, 2013.
  45. ^ Gail Phoebus, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 10, 2013.
  46. ^ Home Page, Sussex County Clerk's Office. Accessed January 10, 2013.
  47. ^ Sheriff's Office, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 10, 2013.
  48. ^ Surrogate's Court, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed April 25, 2013.
  49. ^ County Administrator, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 10, 2013.
  50. ^ a b Voter Registration Summary - Sussex, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed February 17, 2013.
  51. ^ GCT-P7: Selected Age Groups: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision; 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 17, 2013.
  52. ^ General Election November 6, 2012: District Report - Group Detail, Sussex County, New Jersey Clerk, run date November 30, 2012. Accessed February 20, 2013.
  53. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Sussex County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed February 17, 2013.
  54. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Sussex County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed February 17, 2013.
  55. ^ 2009 Governor: Sussex County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed February 17, 2013.
  56. ^ School Data for the Andover Regional School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed February 17, 2013.
  57. ^ Florence M. Burd Elementary School, Andover Regional School District. Accessed August 23, 2013.
  58. ^ Long Pond Middle School, Andover Regional School District. Accessed August 23, 2013.
  59. ^ Our Schools, Andover Regional School District. Accessed August 23, 2013.
  60. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Andover Regional School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed August 23, 2013.
  61. ^ Newton High School 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed August 23, 2013. "Newton High School serves students from Andover Township, Andover Borough, and Green Township as well as historic Newton."
  62. ^ About Us, Newton Public School District. Accessed February 20, 2013. "The Newton Public School District is a K-12 district with an enrollment over 1,500 students in our elementary, middle, and high schools. The high school is home to Newton residents as well as students from neighboring Andover Borough, Andover Township, and Green Township."
  63. ^ "2007-2008 Annual Report". New Jersey Association of Railroad Passengers. 2008. Retrieved 2011-01-02. 
  64. ^ "KENNETH BURKE, 96 PHILOSOPHER, WRITER ON LANGUAGE", Boston Globe, November 22, 1993. Accessed July 16, 2008. "Kenneth Burke, a philosopher who was influential in American literary circles, has died. He was 96. Mr. Burke died Friday of heart failure at his home in Andover, N.J."
  65. ^ Staff. "NEWMAN E. DRAKE DIES AFTER OPERATION; Founder of Bakery Concern Bearing Family Name--Spent Youth on Farm.", The New York Times, March 20, 1930. Accessed June 2, 2011.
  66. ^ Bove, Stephen. "Coming in for a Landing", Asbury Park Press, March 30, 2007. Accessed June 2, 2011. "Made up of Andover-born singer/songwriter Rob Freeman (guitarist and singer for Hidden in Plain View) on vocals, guitars, piano and drums along with Jason Jaksetic on bass and guitars, The Pilot has been writing and recording copious amounts of material while touring and performing regular acoustic sets..."

External links[edit source | edit]