American Athletic Conference

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - View original article

American Athletic Conference
(The American)
American Athletic Conference logo
Established1979 (as the Big East)
July 1, 2013 (reorganized as The American)
AssociationNCAA
DivisionDivision I FBS
Members11 (10 Full Members, 1 Associate Member)
12 (11 Full Members, 1 Associate Member) in 2014
13 (11 Full Members, 2 Associate Members) in 2015
Sports fielded21 (men's: 10; women's: 11)
RegionSouthern (6 schools)
Northeastern (4 schools)
Midwestern (1 school)
Former namesBig East (1979–2013)
HeadquartersProvidence, Rhode Island
CommissionerMichael Aresco (since 2013)
Websitetheamerican.org
Locations
American Athletic Conference locations
 
Jump to: navigation, search
American Athletic Conference
(The American)
American Athletic Conference logo
Established1979 (as the Big East)
July 1, 2013 (reorganized as The American)
AssociationNCAA
DivisionDivision I FBS
Members11 (10 Full Members, 1 Associate Member)
12 (11 Full Members, 1 Associate Member) in 2014
13 (11 Full Members, 2 Associate Members) in 2015
Sports fielded21 (men's: 10; women's: 11)
RegionSouthern (6 schools)
Northeastern (4 schools)
Midwestern (1 school)
Former namesBig East (1979–2013)
HeadquartersProvidence, Rhode Island
CommissionerMichael Aresco (since 2013)
Websitetheamerican.org
Locations
American Athletic Conference locations

The American Athletic Conference (also branded The American) is an American collegiate athletic conference with member institutions located in the northeastern, midwestern, and southern part of the United States.[1][2] The conference is headquartered in Providence, Rhode Island, and led by Commissioner Michael Aresco.[2][3] The American participates in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I in athletic competitions; for football, it is a part of the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS).

The American has member institutions that are spread throughout a wide portion of the United States. The majority of its members are located in urban metropolitan areas, or at least on the fringes thereof. The conference is one of two successors to the all-sports Big East Conference (1979–2013). While the other successor, which does not sponsor football, kept the Big East Conference name, the American Athletic Conference inherited the old Big East's structure and is that conference's legal successor. The prior league underwent substantial turmoil during the 2010–13 NCAA conference realignment period.

The American is currently one of the six automatic qualifying conferences of the Bowl Championship Series (BCS), also known as a "Power Six Conference." The conference inherited the old Big East's BCS berth for the 2013 season.[4] However, the new conference will lose its automatic berth as part of the upcoming College Football Playoff in 2014 and become a part of the "Group of Five", which shares automatic access to one spot in the six premier bowl games. The other four conferences in the group are Conference USA (C-USA), the Mid-American Conference (MAC), the Mountain West Conference, and the Sun Belt Conference.[5]

History[edit]

The original Big East[edit]

Locations of conference member universities

The original Big East Conference was founded in 1979 as a basketball conference, when Providence, St. John's, Georgetown, and Syracuse invited Connecticut, Holy Cross, Rutgers, and Boston College.[6][7] Holy Cross soon thereafter declined the invitation, and Rutgers eventually declined and remained in the Atlantic 10 Conference (then known as the Eastern 8 Conference). Seton Hall was then invited as a replacement.[7] Villanova and Pittsburgh joined shortly thereafter under the leadership of the Big East's first commissioner, Dave Gavitt.[8][9][10]

The conference remained largely unchanged until 1991, when it began to sponsor football, adding Miami as a full member, and Rutgers, Temple, Virginia Tech, and West Virginia as football-only members.[11] Rutgers and West Virginia upgraded to full Big East membership in 1995, while Virginia Tech did the same in 2000. Temple football was kicked out after the 2004 season, but rejoined in 2012 and intended to become a full Big East member in 2013.

The unusual structure of the Big East, with the "football" and "non-football" schools, led to instability in the conference.[12] The waves of defection and replacement brought about by the conference realignments of 2005 and 2010–13 revealed tension between the football-sponsoring and non-football schools that eventually led to the split of the conference in 2013.[13]

Realignment and reorganization[edit]

The conference was reorganized following the tumultuous period of realignment that hobbled the Big East between 2010 and 2013. The Big East was one of the most severely impacted conferences during the most recent conference realignment period. In all, 14 member schools announced their departure for other conferences, and 15 other schools announced plans to join the conference (eight as all-sports members, and four for football only). Three of the latter group later backed out of their plans to join (one for all sports, and the other two for football only). Most notably, seven schools — the Catholic 7 — announced in December 2012 that they would leave as a group, later forming the New Big East.[14]

On December 15, the Big East's seven remaining non-FBS schools, all Catholic institutions — DePaul, Georgetown, Marquette, Providence, St. John's, Seton Hall, and Villanova – announced that they voted unanimously to leave the Big East Conference, effective June 30, 2015.[15] The Catholic 7, by leaving, were looking for a more lucrative television deal than the one they would receive by remaining with the football schools.[16] In March 2013, representatives of the Catholic 7 announced they would leave the conference effective June 30, 2013, retaining the Big East name, $10 million, and the right to hold the conference's basketball tournament at Madison Square Garden.[4][17]

Following the announcement of the departure of the Catholic 7 universities, the remaining ten football-playing members started the process of selecting a new name for the conference and choosing a new site to hold its basketball tournament.[18][19] Various names were considered, with the "America 12" conference reportedly one of the finalists until rejected by college presidents sensitive of adding a number to the end of the conference name.[20] On April 3, 2013, the conference announced that it had chosen a new name: The American Athletic Conference.[1] It also revealed that it prefers the nickname "The American"; it was thought "AAC" would cause too much confusion with the Atlantic Coast Conference, or ACC.[21]

Louisville and Rutgers will only spend one season in the renamed conference. On July 1, 2014, Louisville will join the ACC[22] and Rutgers will join the Big Ten Conference.[23]

Commissioners[edit]

NameTerm
Michael Aresco2013–present[3]

Membership timeline[edit]

EasyTimeline 1.90


Timeline generation failed: 2 errors found
Line 65: bar:Villanova color:OtherC1 from:1979 till:1980 text:A8

- PlotData invalid. Bar 'Villanova' not (properly) defined.


Line 66: bar:Villanova color:OtherC2 from:1980 till:end text:Big East (1980-present)

- PlotData invalid. Bar 'Villanova' not (properly) defined.


The American Full members, The American Assoc. members (football only), The American Assoc. members (other sports), Other colors = Other affiliations

Member universities[edit]

Full members[edit]

The conference currently has ten full member institutions and one associate in eight states, including Connecticut, Florida, Kentucky, New Jersey, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Texas. In 2014, The American will lose its presence in Kentucky and New Jersey but will gain a presence in Louisiana, North Carolina, and Oklahoma. By 2015, the conference will include eleven universities in ten states; the geographic domain of the conference will stretch from Texas to Connecticut (west to east) and from Connecticut to Florida (north to south).

InstitutionLocation
(Population)
FoundedTypeEnrollmentJoined[24]NicknameMascotColors
University of Central FloridaOrlando, Florida
(249,562)
1963Public59,7672013KnightsKnightro, Pegasus         
University of CincinnatiCincinnati, Ohio
(296,223)
1819Public42,4212005BearcatsThe Bearcat         
University of ConnecticutStorrs, Connecticut
(15,344)
1881Public30,0341979[25]HuskiesJonathan the Husky         
University of HoustonHouston, Texas
(2,099,451)
1927Public40,7472013CougarsShasta         
University of LouisvilleLouisville, Kentucky
(746,906)
1798Public23,2622005CardinalsCardinal Bird         
University of MemphisMemphis, Tennessee
(662,897)
1912Public23,0002013TigersTOM         
Rutgers UniversityNew Brunswick, New Jersey
(56,160)
1766Public67,842[26]1991 (football)
1995 (all sports)
Scarlet KnightsScarlet Knight    
University of South FloridaTampa, Florida
(335,709)
1956Public47,1222005BullsRocky the Bull         
Southern Methodist UniversityDallas, Texas
(1,197,816)
1911Private12,0002013MustangsPeruna         
Temple UniversityPhiladelphia, Pennsylvania
(1,526,006)
1884Public37,6971991, 2012 (football)[27]
2013 (all sports)
OwlsHooter, the Owl         

Associate members[edit]

Source:[28]

InstitutionLocation
(Population)
FoundedTypeEnrollmentJoinedSportsConferenceNicknameMascotColors
Villanova UniversityRadnor Township, Pennsylvania
(31,531)
1842Private10,4821980 (full)
2013 (sport only)[29]
Women's RowingBig East ConferenceWildcatsWill D. Cat              

Future members[edit]

Four universities have been invited to join the conference. East Carolina, Tulane, and Tulsa will join in 2014; the Naval Academy (known athletically as "Navy") will join in 2015. Tulane and Tulsa were invited as full members. East Carolina was originally invited as a football-only member, but was subsequently invited as a full member.[30][31] Navy will join as an associate member (football only).[32]

Full Members[edit]

InstitutionLocation
(Population)
FoundedTypeEnrollmentJoiningNicknameMascotColors
East Carolina UniversityGreenville, North Carolina
(86,017)
1907Public27,8162014PiratesPeeDee the Pirate         
Tulane UniversityNew Orleans, Louisiana
(360,740)
1834Private13,3592014Green WaveRiptide the Pelican         
University of TulsaTulsa, Oklahoma
(396,466)
1894Private4,3522014Golden HurricaneCaptain Cane              

Associate Members[edit]

InstitutionLocation
(Population)
FoundedTypeEnrollmentJoiningSportConferenceNicknameMascotColors
United States Naval AcademyAnnapolis, Maryland
(38,394)
1845Federal4,6032015FootballPatriot LeagueMidshipmenBill the Goat         


Sports[edit]

For 2013-14, the American Athletic Conference sponsors championship competition in ten men's and eleven women's NCAA sanctioned sports; Villanova is an associate member for rowing:[33]

Teams in American Athletic Conference competition
SportMen'sWomen's
Baseball
9
-
Basketball
10
10
Cross Country
8
10
Football
10
-
Golf
10
7
Rowing
-
7
Soccer
12
14
Softball
-
8
Swimming & Diving
4
6
Tennis
7
10
Track and Field (Indoor)
8
10
Track and Field (Outdoor)
8
10
Volleyball
-
10

Under NCAA rules reflecting the large number of male scholarship participants in football and attempting to address gender equity concerns (see also Title IX), each member institution is required to provide more women's varsity sports than men's.[34]

The old Big East Conference sponsored championship competition in eleven men's and thirteen women's NCAA sanctioned sports.[35] The new conference will not sponsor men's or women's lacrosse or field hockey. For the 2013-2014 season, all teams in the American which sponsor these sports will compete in the Big East, but this could change for later years.[36] The American's website indicates that it will sponsor men's swimming and diving despite having only four teams.[37]

Men's sponsored sports by school[edit]

SchoolBaseballBasketballCross
Country
FootballGolfSoccerSwimming
& Diving
TennisTrack & Field
(Indoor)
Track & Field
(Outdoor)
Total AAC Sports
CincinnatiGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYRed XNGreen tickYGreen tickY9
ConnecticutGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickY10
East CarolinaGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYRed XNGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickY9
HoustonGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYRed XNRed XNRed XNGreen tickYGreen tickY7
LouisvilleGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickY10
MemphisGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYRed XNGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickY9
RutgersGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYRed XNRed XNGreen tickYGreen tickY8
SMURed XNGreen tickYRed XNGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYRed XNRed XN6
South FloridaGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYRed XNGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickY9
TempleGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYRed XNGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickY9
TulaneGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYRed XNRed XNRed XNGreen tickYRed XNGreen tickY6
TulsaRed XNGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYRed XNGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickY8
UCFGreen tickYGreen tickYRed XNGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYRed XNGreen tickYRed XNRed XN6
Totals9/910/118/910/1110/109/84/47/98/98/983/89

Women's sponsored sports by school[edit]

SchoolBasketballCross
Country
GolfRowingSoccerSoftballSwimming
& Diving
TennisTrack & Field
(Indoor)
Track & Field
(Outdoor)
VolleyballTotal AAC Sports
CincinnatiGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYRed XNGreen tickYRed XNGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickY9
ConnecticutGreen tickYGreen tickYRed XNGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickY10
East CarolinaGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYRed XNGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickY10
HoustonGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYRed XNGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickY10
LouisvilleGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickY11
MemphisGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYRed XNGreen tickYGreen tickYRed XNGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickY9
RutgersGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickY11
SMUGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYRed XNGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickY10
South FloridaGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYRed XNGreen tickYGreen tickYRed XNGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickY9
TempleGreen tickYGreen tickYRed XNGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYRed XNGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickY9
TulaneGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYRed XNRed XNRed XNGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickY8
TulsaGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYRed XNGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickY10
UCFGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYRed XNGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickYGreen tickY10
Totals10/1110/118/96+1/5+1*10/108/86/610/1110/1110/1110/1198+1/104+1

Football[edit]

The conference began football during the 1991–92 season, and was a founding member of the Bowl Championship Series.[39] The American teams play eight conference games a season. Conference opponents operate on a two-year cycle, as a home-and-home series.[40] The conference does not have enough teams to form divisions, but will in 2015 when Navy joins the conference.[41]

Like the conference itself, football experienced much transition through its history – in fact it was the main force behind such departures and expansion. In 2003, the BCS announced that it would adjust the automatic bids granted to its six founding conferences based on results from 2004–07. With the addition of Cincinnati, Louisville, and South Florida in 2005, the conference retained its BCS automatic-qualifying status. In 2007, South Florida rose to No. 2 in the BCS rankings, but finished No. 21 in the final poll. Cincinnati finished the 2009 regular season undefeated at 12–0, and ranked No. 3 in the final BCS standings barely missed playing for the BCS National Championship.

Rivalries[edit]

The American has many rivalries among its member schools, primarily in football. Some rivalries existed before the conference was established or began play in football. Recent conference realignment in 2005 and 2013 ended - or paused - many rivalries. Before their departure to other conferences, a number of former member schools held longtime rivalries within the conference.

Some of the rivalries between The American schools include:

RivalryNameTrophyGames playedBegan
Louisville–Memphis421948
Cincinnati–LouisvilleThe Keg of NailsKeg of Nails521929
East Carolina–UCF121991
South Florida–UCFThe War on I–442005
Houston–SMU281975
Navy–SMUGansz Trophy161930

Bowl games[edit]

PickNameLocationOpposing ConferenceOpposing Pick
1Bowl Championship SeriesBCS At-Large
2Russell Athletic BowlOrlando, FloridaACC3
3Belk BowlCharlotte, North CarolinaACC5
4Pinstripe BowlBronx, New YorkBig 127
5/6BBVA Compass BowlBirmingham, AlabamaSEC8/9
5/6Liberty Bowl (alternate††)Memphis, TennesseeC-USA1
7Beef 'O' Brady's BowlSt. Petersburg, FloridaC-USA4
Notes on bowl game selection

Basketball[edit]

In June 2013, it was announced that the inaugural men's basketball tournament will take place at FedExForum in Memphis.[42] FedExForum had previously hosted eight Conference USA basketball tournaments.

Basketball Tournament History
Men'sWomen's
SchoolPre-NCAA Helms ChampionshipsNCAA ChampionshipsNCAA
Runner-Up
NCAA
Final Fours
NCAA ChampionshipsNCAA
Runner-Up
NCAA
Final Fours
Cincinnati2
(1961, 1962)
1
(1963)
6
(1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1992)
Connecticut3
(1999, 2004, 2011)
4
(1999, 2004, 2009, 2011)
8
(1995, 2000, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2009, 2010, 2013)
14
(1991, 1995, 1996, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013)
Houston2
(1983, 1984)
5
(1967, 1968, 1982, 1983, 1984)
Louisville3
(1980, 1986, 2013)
10
(1959, 1972, 1975, 1980, 1982, 1983, 1986, 2005, 2012, 2013)
2
(2009, 2013)
2
(2009, 2013)
Memphis2
(1973, 2008)
3
(1973, 1985, 2008)
Rutgers1
(1976)
1

(2007)

2

(2000, 2007)

SMU1
(1956)
Temple1
(1938)
2
(1956, 1958)

Notes:

Facilities[edit]

InstitutionFootball stadiumCapacityBasketball arenaCapacityBaseball parkCapacity
All-sports Members
CincinnatiNippert Stadium
Paul Brown Stadium
35,097
65,790
Fifth Third Arena13,176Marge Schott Stadium3,085
ConnecticutRentschler Field40,000Harry A. Gampel Pavilion
XL Center
10,167
16,294
J. O. Christian Field2,000
East Carolina††Dowdy–Ficklen Stadium50,000Williams Arena at Minges Coliseum8,000Clark-LeClair Stadium5,000
HoustonReliant Stadium (2013)
Houston Football Stadium (2014)
70,000
40,000
Hofheinz Pavilion8,479Cougar Field5,000
LouisvillePapa John's Cardinal Stadium55,000KFC Yum! Center22,090Jim Patterson Stadium4,000
MemphisLiberty Bowl Memorial Stadium61,008FedExForum (men)
Elma Roane Fieldhouse (women)
18,119
2,565
FedExPark2,000
RutgersHigh Point Solutions Stadium52,454Louis Brown Athletic Center (The RAC)8,000Bainton Field1,500
SMUGerald J. Ford Stadium32,000Moody Coliseum8,998Non-baseball school
South FloridaRaymond James Stadium65,908USF Sun Dome10,411USF Baseball Stadium3,211
TempleLincoln Financial Field68,532Liacouras Center10,206Skip Wilson Field1,000
Tulane††Mercedes-Benz Superdome (2013)
Yulman Stadium (2014)
73,208
30,000
New Orleans Arena (men)
Devlin Fieldhouse (men/women)
18,500
3,600
Turchin Stadium5,000
Tulsa††H. A. Chapman Stadium30,000Reynolds Center8,355Non-baseball school
UCFBright House Networks Stadium45,323CFE Arena10,072Jay Bergman Field3,900
Associate Member
Navy†††Navy–Marine Corps Memorial Stadium34,000Associate member

Academics[edit]

One of the current member schools, Rutgers University, is a member of the Association of American Universities (AAU).[43] One of the future member schools, Tulane University, is also an AAU member.

Additionally, member schools are also highly ranked nationally and globally by various groups, including U.S. News & World Report, Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU) and Times Higher Education World University Rankings (Times). As of 2012, one conference institution is ranked in the top 100 universities in the world, with Rutgers ranked 59th.[44]

Endowments and rankings[edit]

Conference RankInstitutionLocationEndowment Funds[45]Percentage Change YOYU.S. News Ranking[46]
1Southern Methodist UniversityUniversity Park, Texas$1,196,508,00011.9%60
2Tulane University††New Orleans, Louisiana$1,014,985,00014.2%52
3University of ConnecticutStorrs, Connecticut$312,329,00014.9%57
4Rutgers UniversityNew Brunswick, New Jersey$698,507,00016.7%69
5University of Tulsa††Tulsa, Oklahoma$800,925,00016.7%86
6Temple UniversityPhiladelphia, Pennsylvania$280,731,00019.2%121
7University of CincinnatiCincinnati, Ohio$1,004,368,00013.3%135
8University of LouisvilleLouisville, Kentucky$772,157,00015.4%161
9University of South FloridaTampa, Florida$411,061,23218.0%170
10University of Central FloridaOrlando, Florida$127,129,00023.7%170
11University of HoustonHouston, Texas$662,984,00019.9%190
12East Carolina University††Greenville, North Carolina$128,551,00024.1%181
13University of MemphisMemphis, Tennessee$195,060,0006.5%200+
Villanova UniversityRadnor Township, Pennsylvania$370,292,00024.4%1A
United States Naval Academy†††Annapolis, Maryland
Federal institution
14B

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "New Name in College Sports - Current BIG EAST Enters New Era as 'American Athletic Conference'". 2013-04-03. Retrieved 2013-04-03. 
  2. ^ a b Katz, Andy (2013-03-15). "What's next for the 'old Big East'". "ESPN". Retrieved 2013-03-17. 
  3. ^ a b Russo, Ralph (2013-03-08). "Big East completes official split of football, basketball". Associated Press. Retrieved 2013-03-17. 
  4. ^ a b McMurphy, Brett (2013-03-01). "Catholic 7 to keep 'Big East' name for new league next season, according to sources". "ESPN". Retrieved 2013-03-07. 
  5. ^ Mandel, Stewart (2012-11-12). "Big East, rest of 'Group of Five' score win with six-bowl decision". "Sports Illustrated". Retrieved 2013-03-08. 
  6. ^ Blaudschun, Mark (2013-03-08). "Naming original Big East was simple". AJerseyGuy.com. Retrieved 2013-03-09. 
  7. ^ a b Crouthamel, Jake (2000-12-08). "A Big East History and Retrospective, Part 1". SUAthletics.com. Retrieved 2013-03-09. 
  8. ^ Sarah Maslin Nir (2011-09-17). "Dave Gavitt, the Big East’s Founder, Dies at 73". The New York Times. Retrieved 2013-03-09. 
  9. ^ "Big East, Villanova Make It Official". The Pittsburgh Press, via Google News. United Press International. 1980-03-13. Retrieved 2013-03-09. 
  10. ^ Hanley, Richard F (1981-11-19). "Pittsburgh To Join Big East". Record-Journal (Google News). Retrieved 2013-03-09. 
  11. ^ "Big East Football Timeline". Philly.com. March 8, 2008. Archived from the original on 2012-08-27. Retrieved 2013-03-09. 
  12. ^ Thamel, Pete (2012-05-07). "Commissioner John Marinatto Steps Down Amid Big East’s Instability". The New York Times. Retrieved 2013-03-09. 
  13. ^ "Big East 'unwilling' to meet terms". ESPN. 2013-01-03. Retrieved 2013-03-09. 
  14. ^ Katz, Andy; McMurphy, Brett (2012-12-11). "Big East fate vexes Catholic schools". ESPN. Retrieved 2012-12-11. 
  15. ^ "Seven schools leaving Big East". ESPN. December 15, 2012. Retrieved December 15, 2012. 
  16. ^ Rovell, Darren (2013-01-06). "Sources: 'Catholic 7' eyes big TV deal". ESPN. Retrieved 2013-03-06. 
  17. ^ Harten, David (2013-03-05). "Catholic 7 has framework to keep Big East name, MSG as tourney site". NBC Sports. Retrieved 2013-03-07. 
  18. ^ Blaudschun, Mark (2013-03-06). "Big East, Catholic 7 ready to make split official". AJerseyGuy.com. Retrieved 2013-03-07. 
  19. ^ "Report: $100M for football schools". ESPN. 2013-03-05. Retrieved 2013-03-07. 
  20. ^ Former Big East to be named American Athletic Conference - ESPN. Espn.go.com (2013-04-04). Retrieved on 2013-07-15.
  21. ^ Wolken, Dan (2013-05-29). "American Athletic Conference unveils its primary logos". USA Today. "Beyond the challenge of avoiding something that looked corporate, the league also couldn't build the logo around an acronym. From the very beginning, the conference office has been adamant that it wants to be known as The American instead of the AAC to avoid confusion with the Atlantic Coast Conference." 
  22. ^ http://www.theacc.com/genrel/112812aaa.html
  23. ^ Rutgers Scarlet Knights accept invitation to join Big Ten as Board of Governors gives go-ahead to athletic director Tim Pernetti. NY Daily News (2012-11-19). Retrieved on 2013-07-15.
  24. ^ For Cincinnati, Connecticut, Louisville, Rutgers, and South Florida, as well as the football program at Temple, join dates refer to the date they joined the original Big East.
  25. ^ Connecticut's football program did not join the conference until 2004.
  26. ^ http://www.rutgers.edu/about-rutgers/facts-figures
  27. ^ Temple was not a Big East football member between the 2005 and 2011 seasons, most of this time being spent in the Mid-American Conference.
  28. ^ The American Athletic Conference - Sponsored Sports. Theamerican.org. Retrieved on 2013-07-15.
  29. ^ Villanova joined the conference in 1980 but left as part of the conference breakup. As women's rowing is not a Big East sport, Villanova will participate in the American for the sport.
  30. ^ "East Carolina Joins Soon-To-Be-Renamed BIG EAST in All Sports for 2014-15 Academic Year" (Press release). Big East Conference. March 27, 2013. Retrieved March 27, 2013. 
  31. ^ Tulsa Golden Hurricane to join Big East, according to sources - ESPN. Espn.go.com (2013-03-27). Retrieved on 2013-07-15.
  32. ^ "Big East looking to add 12th school". ESPN. 2013-01-28. Retrieved 2013-03-07. 
  33. ^ The Official Site of The American Athletic Conference. Theamerican.org. Retrieved on 2013-07-15.
  34. ^ Under NCAA Bylaw 20.9.4, all Division I schools are required to sponsor a minimum of seven men's and seven women's sports, or six men's and eight women's sports. Bylaw 20.9.7.1 imposes the latter requirement on FBS schools. FCS schools, under Bylaw 20.9.8.1, may use either requirement. Note that this does not explicitly require that a school sponsor two more women's sports than men's sports. See "2012–13 NCAA Division I Manual". NCAA. Retrieved 2013-03-07. 
  35. ^ BigEast.org
  36. ^ "Temple Joins New Big East In Lacrosse, Field Hockey". Retrieved 29 June 2013. 
  37. ^ "2013–14 Championships". American Athletic Conference. June 22, 2013. Retrieved June 29, 2013. 
  38. ^ "Houston Athletics to Add Women's Golf in 2013-14" (Press release). University of Houston Sports Information. October 15, 2012. Retrieved April 29, 2013. 
  39. ^ "BCS Chronology". bcsfootball.org. Fox Sports. Archived from the original on April 18, 2008. Retrieved November 12, 2008. 
  40. ^ Myerberg, Paul. "Big East announces divisions, adds conference title game". USA Today. Retrieved 10 December 2012. 
  41. ^ [The NCAA currently requires 12 teams for a conference to conduct divisional play and stage a championship game.]
  42. ^ "American Athletic Conference picks Memphis to host league’s 1st men’s basketball tournament". 
  43. ^ Association of American Universities. Aau.edu. Retrieved on 2013-07-15.
  44. ^ "Academic Ranking of World Universities - 2011". ShanghaiRanking Consultancy. 2012. Retrieved 2013-03-07. 
  45. ^ a b As of June 30, 2011. "U.S. and Canadian Institutions Listed by Fiscal Year 2010 Endowment Market Value and Percentage Change in Endowment Market Value from FY 2010 to FY 2011" (PDF). 2012 NACUBO-Commonfund Study of Endowments. National Association of College and University Business Officers. 2012-03-19. 
  46. ^ a b "Best College Rankings and Lists". U.S. News & World Reports. Retrieved 2013-03-07. 

External links[edit]