Testicle (food)

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Goat testicles at a market in Spain
Beef testicles at a market in Italy
Rooster testicle stew (kakashere pörkölt) in Hungary

The testicles of calves, lambs, roosters, and other animals are eaten in many parts of the world, under a wide variety of euphemistic culinary names. Testicles are a by-product of the castration of young male animals raised for meat, so they were probably a late-spring seasonal specialty,[1] though nowadays they are generally frozen and available year-round.

Cookery[edit]

Testicles are cooked in a variety of ways: sautéed and sauced, fricasséed, deep-fried with breading or batter, in pies, poached, roasted, and so on. Before cooking, they are generally scalded, skinned, and soaked in cold water.[2]

Names[edit]

Testicles are known by a wide variety of euphemisms, including 'stones', 'mountain oysters', 'prairie oysters', and so on.[1][3] Lamb testicles in particular are often called 'lamb fries' or simply fries (though that may also refer to other organ meats).[4] The French term "animelles" is occasionally encountered. In Spanish speaking countries in Central and South America they are known as huevos de toro, or 'bull's eggs'.

World variants[edit]

Greece and Cyprus[edit]

In Greece and Cyprus, lamb testicles (Greek αμελέτητα) are often grilled on coals .

United States[edit]

In the United States, bull testicles are usually served breaded and deep-fried as an appetizer, under the name "Rocky Mountain oysters".

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

Media related to testicles (meat) at Wikimedia Commons

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Laura Mason, in Oxford Companion to Food, s.v. 'Testicles'
  2. ^ Prosper Montagné, Larousse Gastronomique, 1938
  3. ^ Oxford English Dictionary s.v. 'stone' 11a, 'mountain' and 'prairie oyster' 2
  4. ^ Oxford English Dictionary, s.v. 'fry' n2 2b