Amador City, California

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City of Amador City
—  City  —
Historic buildings in Amador City
Nickname(s): The gold country’s hidden nugget
Motto: "Essence of the California Gold & Wine Country"
Location of Amador City in Amador County and California
Coordinates: 38°25′10″N 120°49′27″W / 38.41944°N 120.82417°W / 38.41944; -120.82417
Country United States
State California
CountyAmador
Settled1853
IncorporatedJune 2, 1915
Government
 • MayorAaron Brusatori
 • State SenateDave Cox (R)
 • State AssemblyAlyson Huber (D)
 • U. S. CongressTom McClintock (R)[1]
Area[2]
 • Total0.314 sq mi (0.813 km2)
 • Land0.314 sq mi (0.813 km2)
 • Water0 sq mi (0 km2)  0%
Elevation[3]919 ft (280 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total185
 • DensityBad rounding here590/sq mi (Bad rounding here230/km2)
Time zonePST (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST)PDT (UTC-7)
ZIP code95601
Area code(s)209
FIPS code06-01514
GNIS feature ID1657922
Websitewww.amador-city.com
 
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City of Amador City
—  City  —
Historic buildings in Amador City
Nickname(s): The gold country’s hidden nugget
Motto: "Essence of the California Gold & Wine Country"
Location of Amador City in Amador County and California
Coordinates: 38°25′10″N 120°49′27″W / 38.41944°N 120.82417°W / 38.41944; -120.82417
Country United States
State California
CountyAmador
Settled1853
IncorporatedJune 2, 1915
Government
 • MayorAaron Brusatori
 • State SenateDave Cox (R)
 • State AssemblyAlyson Huber (D)
 • U. S. CongressTom McClintock (R)[1]
Area[2]
 • Total0.314 sq mi (0.813 km2)
 • Land0.314 sq mi (0.813 km2)
 • Water0 sq mi (0 km2)  0%
Elevation[3]919 ft (280 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total185
 • DensityBad rounding here590/sq mi (Bad rounding here230/km2)
Time zonePST (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST)PDT (UTC-7)
ZIP code95601
Area code(s)209
FIPS code06-01514
GNIS feature ID1657922
Websitewww.amador-city.com

Amador City (formerly, Amadore's Creek and South Amador) is a city in Amador County, California, United States. The population was 185 at the 2010 census, down from 196 at the 2000 census.

Contents

Geography

Amador City is located at 38°25′10″N 120°49′27″W / 38.41944°N 120.82417°W / 38.41944; -120.82417Coordinates: 38°25′10″N 120°49′27″W / 38.41944°N 120.82417°W / 38.41944; -120.82417.

Only two miles from Sutter Creek on Highway 49, Amador City is the state’s smallest incorporated city by area. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.3 square miles (0.78 km2), all land.

History

The city was founded in 1863 and it was named after Amador County, California, which was named after California soldier Jose Maria Amador.[4] Amador City was incorporated into a city around 1915. Historically located in a rich gold bearing area in the Motherlode of California. In 1848-1849 an unknown creek was prospected by a wealthy rancher named Jose Maria Amador. There were no known settlements until 1851. The California Gold Rush changed the landscape of California. Amador's most famous and productive mine, the Keystone produced about $24 million in gold during 1853-1942. These prices would be higher using today's gold standard.[5]

A post office was established at Amador City in 1863.[6]

Demographics

2010

The 2010 United States Census[7] reported that Amador City had a population of 185. The population density was 589.6 people per square mile (227.7/km²). The racial makeup of Amador City was 171 (92.4%) White, 0 (0.0%) African American, 4 (2.2%) Native American, 2 (1.1%) Asian, 0 (0.0%) Pacific Islander, 2 (1.1%) from other races, and 6 (3.2%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 11 persons (5.9%).

The Census reported that 185 people (100% of the population) lived in households, 0 (0%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 0 (0%) were institutionalized.

There were 85 households, out of which 22 (25.9%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 35 (41.2%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 9 (10.6%) had a female householder with no husband present, 3 (3.5%) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 10 (11.8%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 0 (0%) same-sex married couples or partnerships. 26 households (30.6%) were made up of individuals and 9 (10.6%) had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.18. There were 47 families (55.3% of all households); the average family size was 2.74.

The population was spread out with 37 people (20.0%) under the age of 18, 18 people (9.7%) aged 18 to 24, 40 people (21.6%) aged 25 to 44, 65 people (35.1%) aged 45 to 64, and 25 people (13.5%) who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43.5 years. For every 100 females there were 94.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.0 males.

There were 108 housing units at an average density of 344.2 per square mile (132.9/km²), of which 54 (63.5%) were owner-occupied, and 31 (36.5%) were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 6.9%; the rental vacancy rate was 8.8%. 111 people (60.0% of the population) lived in owner-occupied housing units and 74 people (40.0%) lived in rental housing units.

2000

As of the census[8] of 2000, there were 196 people, 85 households, and 54 families residing in the city. The population density was 601.7 people per square mile (229.3/km²). There were 91 housing units at an average density of 279.4 per square mile (106.5/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 90.82% White, 1.02% Native American, 4.08% from other races, and 4.08% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 9.18% of the population.

There are 85 households out of which 23.5% have children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.5% are married couples living together, 15.3% have a female householder with no husband present, and 35.3% are non-families. 27.1% of all households are made up of individuals and 10.6% have someone living alone who is 65 years of age or older. The average household size is 2.31 and the average family size is 2.76.

In the city the population was spread out with 19.4% under the age of 18, 7.7% from 18 to 24, 27.0% from 25 to 44, 32.7% from 45 to 64, and 13.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 92.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.0 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $45,625, and the median income for a family was $39,861. Males had a median income of $30,313 versus $16,250 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,963. About 14.0% of families and 22.9% of the population are below the poverty line, including 42.5% of those under the age of 18 and none of those 65 and older.

Politics

In the state legislature Amador City is in the 1st Senate District, represented by Republican Dave Cox, and in the 10th Assembly District, represented by Democrat Alyson Huber.

Federally, Amador City is in California's 4th congressional district.[1]

Points of interest

The Imperial Hotel

Traveling the two blocks on Highway 49 the traveler can see signs of abandonment in this once thriving city, a contrast to the time when the placers and underground mines produced in abundance. An abandoned brick building stand next to the Fleetheart Store, a beautiful reflection of the stone masonry of the time. On Main street in Amador City is the old Imperial Hotel, another example of the beautiful brickwork of California's Past.[9]

References

  1. ^ a b "California's 4th Congressional District - Representatives & District Map". GovTrack.us. http://www.govtrack.us/congress/members/CA/4. Retrieved February 28, 2013.
  2. ^ U.S. Census
  3. ^ "USGS—Amador City, California". http://geonames.usgs.gov/pls/gnispublic/f?p=gnispq:3:::NO::P3_FID:1657922. Retrieved 2007-05-24.
  4. ^ William Bright; Erwin Gustav Gudde (30 November 1998). 1500 California place names: their origin and meaning. University of California Press. p. 15. ISBN 978-0-520-21271-8. http://books.google.com/books?id=CET4QodMZysC. Retrieved 20 January 2012.
  5. ^ Historic Highway 49
  6. ^ Durham, David L. (1998). California's Geographic Names: A Gazetteer of Historic and Modern Names of the State. Quill Driver Books. p. 442. ISBN 9781884995149.
  7. ^ All data are derived from the United States Census Bureau reports from the 2010 United States Census, and are accessible on-line here. The data on unmarried partnerships and same-sex married couples are from the Census report DEC_10_SF1_PCT15. All other housing and population data are from Census report DEC_10_DP_DPDP1. Both reports are viewable online or downloadable in a zip file containing a comma-delimited data file. The area data, from which densities are calculated, are available on-line here. Percentage totals may not add to 100% due to rounding. The Census Bureau defines families as a household containing one or more people related to the householder by birth, opposite-sex marriage, or adoption. People living in group quarters are tabulated by the Census Bureau as neither owners nor renters. For further details, see the text files accompanying the data files containing the Census reports mentioned above.
  8. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  9. ^ Division of Mines, The Motherlode Country, Bulletin 141

External links