Alone Again (Naturally)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - View original article

"Alone Again (Naturally)"
Single by Gilbert O'Sullivan
from the album
United StatesBack to Front (1972)
United KingdomGreatest Hits (1976)
B-sideSave It
Released1972
Format7"
Recorded1971
GenrePop
Length3:36
LabelMAM
Writer(s)Gilbert O'Sullivan
ProducerGilbert O'Sullivan
Gilbert O'Sullivan singles chronology
"No Matter How I Try"
(1971)
"Alone Again (Naturally)"
(1972)
"Ooh-Wakka-Do-Wakka-Day"
(1972)
 
Jump to: navigation, search
"Alone Again (Naturally)"
Single by Gilbert O'Sullivan
from the album
United StatesBack to Front (1972)
United KingdomGreatest Hits (1976)
B-sideSave It
Released1972
Format7"
Recorded1971
GenrePop
Length3:36
LabelMAM
Writer(s)Gilbert O'Sullivan
ProducerGilbert O'Sullivan
Gilbert O'Sullivan singles chronology
"No Matter How I Try"
(1971)
"Alone Again (Naturally)"
(1972)
"Ooh-Wakka-Do-Wakka-Day"
(1972)

"Alone Again (Naturally)" is a song by Irish singer–songwriter Gilbert O'Sullivan. It was released in 1972 on the album, Back to Front, and in total spent six weeks, non-consecutively, at #1 on the United States Billboard Hot 100 singles chart. In Casey Kasem's American 'Top 40 of the 1970s', "Alone Again (Naturally)" ranked as the fifth most-popular song of the decade (Debby Boone's "You Light Up My Life" was #1). "Alone Again (Naturally)" also spent six weeks at number one on the Easy Listening chart.[1] The track reached #3 in the UK Singles Chart.[2]

It is an introspective ballad, starting with the singer telling of his plans to commit suicide after being left at the altar, and then telling about the death of his parents. O'Sullivan has said that the song is not autobiographical, as he did not know his father (who died when O'Sullivan was 11) very well, and that his father had mistreated his mother. The mother was not dead at the time that his song was written.[3] "Alone Again (Naturally)" is included on O'Sullivan's The Berry Vest of Gilbert O'Sullivan album (2004) on the EMI record label. Big Jim Sullivan plays the guitar break in the original recorded version of the song.

The landmark 1991 copyright case Grand Upright Music, Ltd. v. Warner Bros. Records Inc. centered on the unauthorized use of a sample from "Alone Again (Naturally)" by rapper Biz Markie.

Contents

Other versions

Bobby Darin covered the song live in 1972. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G5I68PXzzko

Esther Phillips's version of the song was the title track of her classic 1972 album.

Anita Bryant's version of the song was the title track of her 1972 album, Anita Bryant...Naturally.[4]

In 1972, the Dutch comedy duo Van Kooten en De Bie wrote a Dutch version of the song, called '1948 - Toen was geluk heel gewoon [Then happiness was very common]'. It deals about nostalgic feelings of a sober, but happy childhood in the year 1948, just three years after WWII. The song was performed by Gerard Cox. A TV-show by KRO with this title-song (and same title) has been broadcasted from 1994 starring Gerard Cox.

Cass Elliot covered the song live, at The Julie Andrews Hour (1972), Season 1, Episode 8.

Tirso Cruz III covered this song in the album Butterfly (1972).

In 1972 Los Tres Tristes Tigres (Grupo) es:Los Tres Tristes Tigres (grupo) debut, was the album called "Solo Otra Vez"[2] (Alone Again), titled by the song included on it, version of the original sound by O'Sullivan.

Popular balladeer Johnny Mathis covered the song in 1973.

Jazz trumpeter Blue Mitchell covered the song on his 1973 album Graffiti Blues.

Dame Shirley Bassey covered the song on her 1976 album Love, Life, and Feelings.[5]

Jazz musician Dewey Redman included an instrumental version on his 1979 album Musics

Jazz singer Sarah Vaughan covered it on her 1979 album Feelin' Good.

Jazz tenor saxophonist Gene Ammons did an instrumental version on his final recording session (March,18, 19 & 20, 1974); released on his last album, Goodbye.

Nina Simone recorded her own version on the 1982 album Fodder on My Wings. The lyrics are about the death of Nina's father, and her emotions while "I waited three weeks for him to die".

Spanish singer Chao recorded in 1988 a Spanish version called "Solo soy para ti" (I'm only for you), with a very different meaning in the lyric.

The song was covered in 2000 by the American band 58, the group featuring Nikki Sixx, appearing on their release, Diet for a New America.

Har Mar Superstar covered the song on his 2004 album The Handler.

In 2004, Ehud Manor wrote a Hebrew version of the song. This version is called "VeShuv Levad" (Hebrew: "ושוב לבד"‎, "Alone Again"), and sung by Tiki Dayan, an Israeli actress. The Hebrew version was used as the theme song for the Israeli drama series Matay Nitnashek, in 2007.

The song was covered in 2005 by Elton John and the Pet Shop Boys for a rare 2005 promo of Gilbert O'Sullivan. This cover version was never released commercially.

Makoto Ozone made a jazz version of the song for the Japanese television drama Ashita no Kita Yoshio.

In 2007, Donny Osmond and Lazlo Bane covered this song. Donny Osmond on his solo studio album, Love Songs of the '70s and Lazlo Bane on their 70's covers album Guilty Pleasures. However, Lazlo Bane omitted the word "Naturaly" from the song's name.

Neil Diamond released a cover version on his 2010 album "Dreams".

Uses in media

The song has been featured in many movies and TV shows, including Megamind, Summer Time Machine Blues, The Virgin Suicides and Stuck on You. It was the opening theme song of Episode 24 of the anime Maison Ikkoku. (Sullivan's later hit "Get Down" was the closing theme of that same episode, but the producers were unable to use the songs for more than one episode due to copyright problems.)

The song can be heard briefly in the background in the movie Osmosis Jones.

The episode "Alone Again, Natura-Diddily" of the eleventh season of the animated television series The Simpsons, is a clear reference to the song, as is season 20's No Loan Again, Naturally. In the season 17 episode "The Wettest Stories Ever Told" of The Simpsons, Comic Book Guy uses the song as inspirational music.

During the second series of the British television drama Life on Mars, it is used as an end theme of one episode.

In May 2000, a cover version of the song appeared on Diet for a New America by the band 58, a side project by Mötley Crüe's Nikki Sixx.

The song is used in the feature film Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs, with the lyrics humorously altered to be in context with the movie. It is the background score for the sequence when the famous acorn is abandoned by the squirrel for his newfound love.

In the episode "Look Who's Stalking" of the television series Veronica Mars, the song is referenced in a banter between the characters. Logan asks Veronica "Alone again?" and she replies "Naturally".

The lyric "65 years old, my mother, God rest her soul" is referenced in the song "Fly" by Sugar Ray, changed to "25 years old".

In the 2003 film Love Actually, the character of Colin Firth says to himself, upon arriving at his secluded cabin after discovering that his girlfriend cheated on him with his brother, "Alone again. Naturally."

In the 2002 film, Stuart Little 2, the song can be heard while Stuart is driving after George goes off to play with his friends and not allow him to partake in the fun.

The song also appeared, covered by Vonda Shepard, in the TV series "Ally McBeal".

Most recently this song was used in the show Napoleon Dynamite after Deb and Pedro become enemies and Napoleon is all alone.

References

  1. ^ Whitburn, Joel (2002). Top Adult Contemporary: 1961-2001. Record Research. p. 187.
  2. ^ Roberts, David (2006). British Hit Singles & Albums (19th ed.). London: Guinness World Records Limited. p. 411. ISBN 1-904994-10-5.
  3. ^ "Alone Again (Naturally)"
  4. ^ [1] Billboard Magazine, November 18, 1972
  5. ^ Love, Life, and Feelings track list

External links

Preceded by
"Lean on Me" by Bill Withers
Billboard Hot 100 number one single
July 29, 1972 (four weeks)
Succeeded by
"Brandy (You're a Fine Girl)" by Looking Glass
Preceded by
"Brandy (You're a Fine Girl)" by Looking Glass
Billboard Hot 100 number one single
September 2, 1972 (two weeks)
Succeeded by
"Black and White" by "Three Dog Night"
Preceded by
"Where Is the Love" by Roberta Flack and Donnie Hathaway
Billboard Easy Listening Singles number-one single
July 29, 1972 (six weeks)
Succeeded by
"The Guitar Man" by Bread