AllMusic

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AllMusic
Wordmark of AllMusic (2013).png
Logo of AllMusic (2013).png
The logotype and logo of AllMusic, used since July 2013
Web addressallmusic.com
SloganMusic Search, Recommendations, Videos and Reviews
Commercial?Yes
Type of siteOnline database for music albums, artists and songs; including reviews and biographies
RegistrationNo
Available language(s)English
OwnerAll Media Guide (Rovi)
Created byMichael Erlewine
Launched1991
Alexa rankpositive decrease 2,633 (February 2013)[1]
Current statusActive
 
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AllMusic
Wordmark of AllMusic (2013).png
Logo of AllMusic (2013).png
The logotype and logo of AllMusic, used since July 2013
Web addressallmusic.com
SloganMusic Search, Recommendations, Videos and Reviews
Commercial?Yes
Type of siteOnline database for music albums, artists and songs; including reviews and biographies
RegistrationNo
Available language(s)English
OwnerAll Media Guide (Rovi)
Created byMichael Erlewine
Launched1991
Alexa rankpositive decrease 2,633 (February 2013)[1]
Current statusActive

AllMusic (previously known as All Music Guide or AMG)[2] is an online music guide service website, owned by Rovi. AllMusic was founded in 1991 by popular culture archivist Michael Erlewine as a guide for consumers. Its first reference book was published the following year. When first released onto the Internet, AMG predated the World Wide Web and was first available as a Gopher site.

AMG headquarters is located in Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States.

Content[edit]

AllMusic's database, which is licensed and used in point-of-sale systems by some music retailers, includes the following:

AllMusic also claims to have the largest digital archive of music, including about six million digital songs, as well as the largest cover art library, with more than half a million cover image scans.

The AllMusic database is also used by several generations of Windows Media Player and Musicmatch Jukebox to identify and organize music collections. Windows Media Player 11 and the integrated MTV Urge music store have expanded the use of AllMusic data to include related artists, biographies, reviews, playlists and other data.

AllMusic is also used to provide catalog data, artist biographies, album reviews, related artist information, playlists and other information in the iTunes Music Store, Zune Marketplace, Zune player, eMusic, AOL, Yahoo!, Amazon.com and other music stores. AllMusic is also at the heart of the Naim Extended Music database used by the Naim HDX hard disk player.

In 2011 it was announced by Rovi that AllMusic, along with AllMovie and AllGames, drew a combined three million unique visitors a month.[3]

Reviewers[edit]

Reviewers include Greg Adams, Mark Allender, Jason Ankeny, Roxanne Blanford, Marisa Brown, John Bush, Al Campbell, Nate Cavalieri, Eugene Chadbourne, Matt Collar, Sean Cooper, Ken Dryden, Bruce Eder, Jason Elias, Stephen Thomas Erlewine, Katherine Fulton, Jo-Anne Greene, Steve Huey, David Jeffries, Thom Jurek, Andy Kellman, Rudyard Kennedy, Don Kline, the late Cub Koda, Andrew Leahey, Steve Leggett, Jason Lymangrover, Scott McClintock, Greg McIntosh, Opal Louis Nations, Wilson Neate, Heather Phares, Greg Prato,[4] Ned Raggett, Margaret Reges, Eduardo Rivadavia, John Phillip Roberts, William Ruhlmann, Tim Sendra, Michael Sutton, Jeff Tamarkin, Rob Theakston, Richie Unterberger, Sean Westergaard, and Scott Yanow.[5]

Reception[edit]

AllMusic was named as one of PC Magazine's "Top 100 Classic Websites".[6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Allmusic.com Site Info". Alexa Internet. Retrieved 2013-02-02. 
  2. ^ "AllMusic". Retrieved July 20, 2012. 
  3. ^ Bruno, Anthony (February 28, 2011). "AllMusic.com Folding Into AllRovi.com for One-Stop Entertainment Shop". Billboard. Retrieved June 15, 2013. 
  4. ^ "Greg Prato". Retrieved March 29, 2007. 
  5. ^ "AMG Editors". Retrieved March 19, 2008. 
  6. ^ Heater, Brian. "Top 100 Classic Websites – AllMusic – Slideshow from pcmag.com". pcmag.com. Retrieved June 15, 2013. 

External links[edit]