Ali Smith

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Ali Smith
AliSmith2011.png
Born1962
Inverness, Scotland
OccupationNovelist
NationalityScottish
Alma materUniversity of Aberdeen
Period1995–present
 
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Ali Smith
AliSmith2011.png
Born1962
Inverness, Scotland
OccupationNovelist
NationalityScottish
Alma materUniversity of Aberdeen
Period1995–present

Ali Smith FRSL (born 1962 in Inverness) is a Scottish writer.

She was born to working-class parents,[1] raised in a council house in Inverness and now lives in Cambridge.[2][3] She studied at the University of Aberdeen and then at Newnham College, Cambridge, for a PhD that she never finished.[1] She worked as a lecturer at University of Strathclyde until she fell ill with CFS/ME. Following this she became a full-time writer[4] and now writes for The Guardian, The Scotsman, and the Times Literary Supplement.[5] Openly gay,[6] she lives in Cambridge with her partner filmmaker Sarah Wood.[1]

In 2007 she was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature [7]

In 2009, she donated the short story Last (previously published in the Manchester Review Online) to Oxfam's 'Ox-Tales' project, four collections of UK stories written by 38 authors. Her story was published in the 'Fire' collection.[8]

Short story collections[edit]

Novels[edit]

Non-Fiction[edit]

Plays[edit]

Other projects[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Winterson, Jeanette (25 April 2003). "Ali Smith". The Times. Retrieved 2009-02-28. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f "Ali Smith". Contemporary Writers in the UK. The British Council. Retrieved 2009-02-27. 
  3. ^ a b Matthews, Elizabeth (30 March 2007). "Novel approach struck a chord with Inverness writer". The Inverness Courier. Retrieved 2009-02-27. 
  4. ^ a b "Ali Smith". guardian.co.uk. Guardian News and Media Limited. 22 July 2008. Retrieved 2009-02-27. 
  5. ^ http://www.theshortreview.com/reviews/AliSmithFirstPersonAndOtherStories.htm
  6. ^ http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/arts/books/article3021433.ece?lightbox=false
  7. ^ "Royal Society of Literature All Fellows". Royal Society of Literature. Retrieved 10 August 2010. 
  8. ^ Oxfam: Ox-Tales
  9. ^ Guest, Katy (3 October 2008). "The First Person and Other Stories, By Ali Smith". The Independent. Archived from the original on 18 April 2009. Retrieved 23 April 2009. 
  10. ^ Buksh, Ayshea (30 March 2007). "School actors take centre stage". BBC London. Retrieved 2009-02-28. 
  11. ^ Dawson Scott, Robert and Maxwell, Dominic (30 July 2007). "The 20 must-see acts at the Edinburgh Fringe". London: The Times. Retrieved 2009-02-28. 
  12. ^ http://www.themyths.co.uk/?p=22
  13. ^ "Sundial Scottish Arts Council Book of the Year". Scottish Arts Council. Retrieved 2009-02-27. 
  14. ^ http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2011/nov/25/books-of-the-year Books of the year 2011
  15. ^ "Jim Crace makes Goldsmiths Prize shortlist". BBC news. 1 October 2013. Retrieved October 20, 2013. 
  16. ^ "Shortlist 2013". Goldsmiths Prize. 1 October 2013. Retrieved October 20, 2013. 
  17. ^ a b http://www.doollee.com/PlaywrightsS/smith-ali.html
  18. ^ http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/s/ali-smith/book-lover.htm
  19. ^ A Light to Read By, by Leah Hager Cohen in The New York Times, February 1, 2013
  20. ^ Full text: "Brick: a literary journal" (Number 92, Winter 2014, pp. 9–27); extract on line at www.brickmag.com.