Alex Berenson

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Alex Berenson
Born(1973-01-06) January 6, 1973 (age 39)
OccupationAuthor, Former Reporter for New York Times
LanguageEnglish
NationalityUnited StatesAmerican
CitizenshipUnited StatesAmerican
EducationBachelor Degree
History and Economics
Alma materYale University (1994)
GenresSpy fiction
SubjectsTerrorism
Notable award(s)Edgar Award (2007[1])
Spouse(s)Jacqueline
Relative(s)Parents: Ellen and Harvey

www.alexberenson.com
 
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Alex Berenson
Born(1973-01-06) January 6, 1973 (age 39)
OccupationAuthor, Former Reporter for New York Times
LanguageEnglish
NationalityUnited StatesAmerican
CitizenshipUnited StatesAmerican
EducationBachelor Degree
History and Economics
Alma materYale University (1994)
GenresSpy fiction
SubjectsTerrorism
Notable award(s)Edgar Award (2007[1])
Spouse(s)Jacqueline
Relative(s)Parents: Ellen and Harvey

www.alexberenson.com

Alex Berenson (born January 6, 1973) is a former reporter for The New York Times and author of six novels and a book on corporate financial filings.[2]

Contents

Life

Berenson was born in New York, and grew up in Englewood, NJ.[3] Later in life he graduated from Yale University in 1994 with bachelor's degrees in history and economics. He joined the Denver Post in June 1994 as a business reporter. He published 513 articles through August 1996, when he left to join TheStreet.com, a financial news website founded by Jim Cramer. In December 1999, Berenson joined The New York Times as a business investigative reporter.

In the fall of 2003 and the summer of 2004, Berenson covered the occupation of Iraq for the Times. More recently, he has covered the pharmaceutical and health care industries, specializing in issues concerning dangerous drugs. Since December 2008, Berenson has reported on the Bernard Madoff $50 billion Ponzi scheme scandal.

He has written six spy novels, all featuring the same protagonist, CIA agent John Wells. His first novel, The Faithful Spy, was released in April 2006 and won an Edgar Award for best first novel by an American author. In February 2008, The Faithful Spy rose to #1 on the New York Times paperback bestseller list.

The same month, Berenson released his second thriller, The Ghost War. His third novel, The Silent Man, followed in February 2009. His fourth, The Midnight House, was released on February 9, 2010 and debuted at #9 on The New York Times bestseller list. The fifth, "The Secret Soldier," was released on February 8, 2011 and debuted at #6 on the bestseller list. The sixth, "The Shadow Patrol," was released on February 21, 2012, and debuted at #8. In July 2012, The Shadow Patrol was named a finalist for the Ian Fleming Steel Dagger Award, given by Britain's Crime Writers Association.

In 2010, Berenson left the Times to become a full-time novelist. He lives in the East Village of Manhattan with his wife, Jacqueline Berenson, a forensic psychiatrist and researcher at Columbia University.

Awards

Books

Novels

TitleAuthorPublisherDateGenreISBN
The Faithful SpyAlex BerensonRandom HouseApril 25, 2006Spy fictionISBN 978-0-345-47899-3
The Ghost WarAlex BerensonG.P. Putnam's Sons dba Penguin GroupFebruary 12, 2008Spy fictionISBN 978-0-399-15453-1
The Silent ManAlex BerensonG.P. Putnam's Sons dba Penguin GroupFebruary 10, 2009Spy fictionISBN 978-0-399-15538-4
The Midnight HouseAlex BerensonG.P. Putnam's Sons dba Penguin GroupFebruary 10, 2010Spy fictionISBN 978-0-399-15620-5
The Secret SoldierAlex BerensonG.P. Putnam's Sons dba Penguin GroupFebruary 8, 2011Spy fictionISBN 978-0-339-15708-0
The Shadow PatrolAlex BerensonG.P. Putnam's Sons dba Penguin GroupFebruary 21, 2012Spy fictionISBN 978-0-339-15829-2

Non-fiction

References

  1. ^ a b "The Edgars 2007 - Best First Novel By An American Author". The Edgars 2007. Mystery Writers of America. http://www.theedgars.com/nominees07.html#bestfirst. Retrieved 12 September 2010. 
  2. ^ Berenson, Alex. "Alex Berenson - The New York Times". Topics.nytimes.com. Archived from the original on 4 October 2010. http://topics.nytimes.com/topics/reference/timestopics/people/b/alex_berenson/index.html. Retrieved 2010-09-12. 
  3. ^ "Alex Berenson Biography". http://www.alexberenson.com/?page_id=25. Retrieved 12 September 2010. 

External links