Aleksei Balabanov

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Aleksei Balabanov
Aleksei Balabanov (1).jpg
Born(1959-02-25)25 February 1959
Sverdlovsk, USSR
Died18 May 2013(2013-05-18) (aged 54)
Saint Petersburg, Russia
OccupationFilm director
Years active1989 – 2012
 
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Aleksei Balabanov
Aleksei Balabanov (1).jpg
Born(1959-02-25)25 February 1959
Sverdlovsk, USSR
Died18 May 2013(2013-05-18) (aged 54)
Saint Petersburg, Russia
OccupationFilm director
Years active1989 – 2012

Aleksei Balabanov (25 February 1959 – 18 May 2013)[1] was a popular Russian filmmaker. He was best known for the 1997 crime film Brat (English title: Brother), and its more action-oriented sequel, Brat-2 (Brother 2), both of which starred Sergei Bodrov, Jr. as a novice hit man. Brother was successful both at the box office and in video copies, achieving wide popularity in Russia.[2] Later, however, Balabanov became better known for his shocking and controversial films Cargo 200 (2007) and Morphine (2008).[3]

Life[edit]

Aleksei Oktyabrinovich Balabanov was born on 25 Feb. 1959, in Sverdlovsk (now Yekaterinburg).[4]

In 1981 Balabanov graduated from Translation Faculty of Gorky Teachers’ Training University.[4] He then served in the Soviet Army as a translator.[4] After his discharge, from 1983 to 1987 he worked as an assistant of a film director at Sverdlovsk film studio.[4] Later Balabanov studied at the experimental course “Auteur Cinema” (Russian: Авторское кино) of the High Courses for Scriptwriters and Film Directors, graduating in 1990.[4] In 1994 Balabanov together with Sergey Selyanov and Viktor Sergeyev founded the production company CTV.[2]

Balabanov died on 18 May 2013 of a heart attack.[4] "Mr. Balabanov is survived by his wife, Nadezhda Vasilyeva, a costume designer, and two sons."[4] "At his death, he was planning to make a film on Stalin, portraying him as a godfather of crime."[4]

Literature[edit]

Filmography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Russian cult film director Alexei Balabanov dies". BBC News. 18 May 2013. Retrieved 19 May 2013. 
  2. ^ a b The Imperial Trace : Recent Russian Cinema: Recent Russian Cinema. Oxford University Press. 2009. p. 220. ISBN 0199710546. 
  3. ^ "Russian cult film director Balabanov dies". Herald Sun. 19 May 2013. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h "Aleksei Balabanov Russian Film Director Dies at 54". New York Times. 21 May 2013. Retrieved 23 May 2013. 

External links[edit]