Albert Salmi

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Albert Salmi
Albert Salmi in trailer for "The Brothers Karamazov" (1958 film)
Born(1928-03-11)March 11, 1928
Brooklyn, New York, USA
DiedApril 22, 1990(1990-04-22) (aged 62)
Spokane, Washington
Cause of deathMurder of second wife and subsequent suicide
OccupationActor
Years active1955–1989
Spouse(s)

(1) Peggy Ann Garner (married 1956-1963, divorced, 1 daughter)

(2) Roberta Pollock Taper ( -1990, 2 daughters)
Children3 daughters
 
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Albert Salmi
Albert Salmi in trailer for "The Brothers Karamazov" (1958 film)
Born(1928-03-11)March 11, 1928
Brooklyn, New York, USA
DiedApril 22, 1990(1990-04-22) (aged 62)
Spokane, Washington
Cause of deathMurder of second wife and subsequent suicide
OccupationActor
Years active1955–1989
Spouse(s)

(1) Peggy Ann Garner (married 1956-1963, divorced, 1 daughter)

(2) Roberta Pollock Taper ( -1990, 2 daughters)
Children3 daughters

Albert Salmi (March 11, 1928 – April 22, 1990) was an American actor of stage, film, and television.

Biography[edit]

Albert Salmi was born in Brooklyn, New York, to Finnish immigrant parents,[1] and following a stint in the Army, took up acting as a career, studying Method acting with Lee Strasberg.[2] In 1955, Salmi starred in the play Bus Stop on Broadway. He volunteered to go on the road with the show, where he fell in love with and on May 16, 1956, married his leading lady, former child actress Peggy Ann Garner. Their only child, Catherine Ann Salmi, died in 1995 of premature heart disease at the age of thirty-eight.

Salmi and Garner divorced on March 13, 1963. He remarried; with his second wife, Roberta Pollock Taper, he had two other daughters.

He made his film debut as Smerdjakov in the 1958 movie version of The Brothers Karamazov, with Yul Brynner, Lee J. Cobb, William Shatner, and Richard Basehart. Salmi's next film was The Bravados in which he played one of the villains hunted down by hero Gregory Peck. The National Board of Review presented Salmi with the NBR Award for Best Supporting Actor for his work in both of these films.

He had several memorable roles on CBS's The Twilight Zone including "Of Late I Think of Cliffordville","A Quality of Mercy" and "Execution" and also appeared twice as the incorrigible pirate, Alonzo P. Tucker on Lost in Space. He appeared in a Gunsmoke episode as a killer who comes to an ironic end.

Salmi guest starred in NBC's The Virginian episode as an outlaw who changed his ways to become a Franciscan monk. In a 1960 episode of Have Gun — Will Travel he played a quick-tempered priest who risks his life to protect a wanted man from a vigilante. He guest starred in such series as Naked City, The Investigators, Combat!, Stoney Burke, Bonanza, The Travels of Jaimie McPheeters, Redigo, The Big Valley, The Legend of Jesse James, Custer, The Eleventh Hour, The Road West (in the 1967 series finale "Elizabeth's Odyssey"), Route 66, and Knight Rider. He guest starred in the 1966 episode, "Dead Men's Doubloons", of the science fiction series, Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea.

In the fall of 1964, he started a role as the comical Yadkin on NBC's western series, Daniel Boone opposite Fess Parker.

Salmi also appeared in 2 episodes of the CBS series "Lost In Space" as "Space Pirate" Alonzo P. Tucker in the first and second seasons. He was revealed to be a cowboy from the 1880s who was captured by aliens and placed in a "deep freeze", eventually escaping in a ship he pirated.

Salmi had a regular role on NBC's legal drama, Petrocelli. In Land of the Giants series finale he appeared as a pair of evil twins. He was cast in an episode entitled The Jokester on Alfred Hitchcock Presents. In 1980, he appeared alongside David Carradine in the aviation film, Cloud Dancer. That same year, he played protagonist, Danny Noonan's father in Caddyshack. Salmi also played a cowboy in an episode titled "The Waiting Room" in Rod Serling's Night Gallery. In 1984, he played the hard drinking but loving father of character Diane Lawson in the movie Hard to Hold.

A high point of Salmi's career came in 1968, when he was cast in the Arthur Miller play The Price. He played the lead on Broadway and in London.

Death[edit]

In 1990, Albert and Roberta Salmi were found shot to death in their home in Spokane, Washington. According to police, Salmi, who was separated from Roberta at the time and was suffering from severe clinical depression, shot and killed his wife and then committed suicide.[1][3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Albert Salmi, Actor, 62, Is Found Shot to Death in Home With Wife". The New York Times. 1990-04-25. Retrieved 2008-03-29. 
  2. ^ Garfield, David (1980). "Appendix: Life Members of The Actors Studio as of January 1980". A Player's Place: The Story of The Actors Studio. New York: MacMillan Publishing Co., Inc. p. 278. ISBN 0-02-542650-8. 
  3. ^ Biography: Spotlights & Shadows: The Albert Salmi Story, BearManor Media, 2004. ISBN 1-59393-001-1

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]