Air Force Specialty Code

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The Air Force Specialty Code (AFSC) is an alphanumeric code used by the United States Air Force to identify an Air Force Specialty (AFS). Officer AFSCs consist of four characters and enlisted AFSCs consist of five characters. A letter prefix or suffix may be used with an AFSC when more specific identification of position requirements and individual qualifications is necessary. The AFSC is similar to the Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) used by the United States Army and the United States Marine Corps or enlisted ratings and USN officer designators and USCG officer specialities used by the United States Navy and the United States Coast Guard.

History[edit]

After the Air Force separated from the Army in 1947, it retained the Army's system of MOS occupation codes, modifying them in 1954. These were 5-digit codes; for example a maintenance data systems specialist was 39150 and a weather technician was 25170. In October 1993, the Air Force implemented a new system of AFSCs, aligning occupations with the forcewide restructuring that was implemented under Merrill McPeak.[1] These reduced officer AFSCs from 216 to 123 and enlisted AFSCs from 203 to 176.

Enlisted AFSCs[edit]

The enlisted AFSC consists of five alphanumeric characters:

For example, in the AFSC 1N371:

For some specialties, an alpha prefix is used to denote a special ability, skill, qualification or system designator not restricted to a single AFSC (such as "X" for an aircrew position). Additionally, an alpha suffix (a “shredout”) denotes positions associated with particular equipment or functions within a single specialty (an Afrikaans specialist in the Germanic linguist field would have an "E" shredout). Using the above example, the AFSC X1N371E would refer to a Germanic Cryptologic Linguist who is aircrew qualified and specializes in Afrikaans.

Here is an extended listing of AFSC groups. Most categories have numerous actual AFSCs in them.

Operations[edit]

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Maintenance/Logistics[edit]

Support[edit]

Medical[edit]

United States Air Force Medical Corps Badge.svg

Professional[edit]

United States Air Force Paralegal Badge.svg
United States Air Force Chaplain's Assistant Badge.svg

Acquisition[edit]

United States Air Force Acquisition and Financial Management Badge.svg

Special Investigations[edit]

Special Duty Identifiers[edit]

Reporting Identifiers[edit]

Officer AFSCs[edit]

The officer AFSC consists of four alphanumeric characters:

For example, in the AFSC 11A4:

For example, in the AFSC T63A3

As with enlisted AFSCs, prefixes and suffixes may be applied to make the AFSC more specific.

Operations[edit]

Logistics[edit]

Support[edit]

Medical[edit]

Professional[edit]

Acquisition[edit]

Special Investigations[edit]

Special Duty Identifiers[edit]

Reporting Identifiers[edit]

Additional information[edit]

During the course of their Air Force careers, Airmen sometimes switch jobs and receive multiple AFSCs to denote training in multiple specialties. A Primary AFSC (PAFSC) is the designation for the specialty in which the individual possesses the highest skill level and is, therefore, the AFSC that he or she is best qualified to perform. The Duty AFSC (DAFSC) reflects the actual manpower position the Airman is assigned to. The Control AFSC (CAFSC) is a management tool to make assignments, assist in determining training requirements, and consider individuals for promotion. Often an enlisted Airman's PAFSC will reflect a higher skill level than his or her CAFSC since the CAFSC skill level is tied to rank while the PAFSC skill level is tied to performance and education.

Usually, the PAFSC, DAFSC, and CAFSC will be the same. However, situations such as retraining, special duties, or Air Force-level changes necessitate these distinctions. Additionally, Airmen that have retrained into multiple specialties will have several Secondary AFSCs (2AFSC, 3AFSC, etc.).

Special Experience Identifiers (SEIs) are established to identify special experience and training. The Air Force Enlisted Classification Directory (AFECD) contains the complete list of authorized SEIs and includes designation criteria and authorized AFSC combinations. (AFI 36-2101)

AFSC/MOS/Rating Conversion[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Air Force Officer Specialty Structure: Reviewing the Fundamentals, 2009. Rand Corporation, ISBN 978-0-8330-4619-2.
  2. ^ New cyberspace support career field stood up Nov. 1, 11/5/2009, Air Force News Service
  3. ^ Don't call him a hero, 3/27/2009, Capital Flyer
  4. ^ Air Force officials announce remotely piloted aircraft pilot training pipeline, Tech. Sgt. Amaani Lyle, Secretary of the Air Force Public Affairs, 6/9/2010
  5. ^ http://usmilitary.about.com/od/officerjobs/a/62ex_2.htm

External links[edit]