AgustaWestland AW139

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AW139
Spanish Maritime Safety Agency AW139SAR, during the Festa al Cel airshow in Barcelona, Spain.
RoleMedium-lift SAR/utility helicopter
ManufacturerAgustaWestland
First flight3 February 2001
Introduction2003
Primary usersCHC Helicopter
Irish Air Corps
UAE Air Force
Number built500
Unit cost$21 million
Developed intoAgustaWestland AW149
 
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AW139
Spanish Maritime Safety Agency AW139SAR, during the Festa al Cel airshow in Barcelona, Spain.
RoleMedium-lift SAR/utility helicopter
ManufacturerAgustaWestland
First flight3 February 2001
Introduction2003
Primary usersCHC Helicopter
Irish Air Corps
UAE Air Force
Number built500
Unit cost$21 million
Developed intoAgustaWestland AW149

The AgustaWestland AW139 is a 15-seat medium sized twin-engined helicopter manufactured by AgustaWestland. Originally designed and developed jointly by Agusta and Bell Helicopters and marketed as the Agusta-Bell AB139, it was redesignated the AW139 when Bell withdrew from the project.

The AW139 has become one of AgustaWestland's most influential products; it has been subsequently developed into two enlarged medium-lift helicopters, the military-orientated AW149 and the AW189 for the civil market.

Contents

Design and development

Origins

In 1997, the Italian helicopter manufacturer Agusta launched a programme to develop a replacement for the Bell Huey family of helicopters, which had been built in very large numbers both by Bell and Agusta, with a potential market of 900 aircraft being predicted. In 1998, Bell and Agusta entered into an agreement, setting up a joint venture, Bell/Agusta Aerospace Company (BAAC) to develop both the Italian helicopter and a tiltrotor aircraft, which became the Bell/Agusta AB139 and Bell/Agusta BA609 respectively.[1]

The first orders were placed by Bristow Helicopters on 26 September 2000. The first AW139 flew on 3 February 2001 at Vergiate in Italy,[2][3] and the first production aircraft on 24 June 2002.[4] The first customer aircraft was delivered in 2003.

Type overview

The AB139 is a conventional layout twin-engined transport helicopter. It has a five-bladed fully articulated main rotor with a titanium hub and composite blades and a four-bladed tail rotor. It is fitted with a retractable tricycle landing gear. It is flown by a crew of two pilots, with up to 15 passengers accommodated in three rows of five. It is powered by two Pratt & Whitney PT6C turboshaft engines.[5] The helicopter is being marketed for use in a number of roles including Law Enforcement/Emergency Medical Service, Executive Transport, Search and Rescue, Maritime and Offshore Oil Operations.

Further development

The AW139 was evaluated as a contender in the U.S. Army's Light Utility Helicopter Program, the rival Eurocopter EC145 was selected instead. At the Farnborough Air Show in 2006, AgustaWestland announced the AW149 as a multi-role battlefield helicopter variant of the AW139. The company has orders for over 430 helicopters, of which over 200 had been delivered by January 2009.

In late 2006, it was announced that the Japan Coast Guard had selected the AW139 as the replacement for its fleet of Bell 212 helicopters; 24 AW139s are expected to be delivered, beginning in 2008. The Irish Air Corps began taking delivery of its first AW139s in 2007. The type will replace the Aerospatiale Alouette III in the army support and basic transport roles.

In 2007, a second production line at the AgustaWestland Aerospace plant in Philadelphia, United States was established. By 2011, AgustaWestland was producing 90 AW139s a year, the helicopter had also directly produced 9.5% of the company's overall revenue in 2010.[6]

In June 2010, it was announced that Agusta and Rosvertol (Russian Helicopters) would build a plant in Tomilino, Moscow Region, jointly producing AW139s from late 2011.[7]

Variants

AB139
Original Italian-built production aircraft, 54 built.[8]
AW139
Designation change from 55th aircraft onwards, built in Italy and the United States.[8]
AW139 (long nose configuration)
Long nose variant with increased room for avionics built in both Italy and the United States.[8]
AW139M
Military variant.[9]
HH-139A
Italian air force designation for ten search-and rescue configured AW139Ms.[10]

Notable accidents and incidents

Operators

The AW139 is used by both private individuals and companies and helicopter charter, including offshore support. It is also used by law enforcement and government use in particular air ambulance and coastguard use.

Military operators

An AW139 air ambulance bearing the insignia and colours of the Ambulance Service of New South Wales
AW139 on display at the Farnborough Air Show in July 2006
Italian Coast Guard AW139
Irish Air Corps AW139
HM Coastguard AgustaWestland AW139 helicopter.
Ornge AW139 air ambulance in Ontario
LAFD Fire 5, lifts off at Van Nuys Airport
 Algeria
 Azerbaijan
 Cyprus
 Egypt
 Ireland
 Italy
 Lebanon
 Qatar
 Thailand
 Trinidad and Tobago
 United Arab Emirates

Government Operators

 Malaysia

Specifications AW139 (long nose)

Data from [8]

General characteristics

Performance

See also

Related development
Aircraft of comparable role, configuration and era
Related lists

References

Citations

  1. ^ Niccoli 2001, p. 158.
  2. ^ Jackson 2003, p. 227.
  3. ^ Niccoli 2001, p. 163.
  4. ^ Jackson 2003, p. [31].
  5. ^ Niccoli 2001, pp. 158–159, 162.
  6. ^ Osborne, Tony. "PAS 2011: AW139 has 'changed' AgustaWestland's behaviour". Rotorhub. Shephard Media. 20 June 2011. Retrieved 11 November 2012.
  7. ^ Comments. "Italian, Russian Firms to Build Helicopter Factory | Business". The Moscow Times. http://www.themoscowtimes.com/business/article/italian-russian-firms-to-build-helicopter-factory/408863.html. Retrieved 2012-09-14.
  8. ^ a b c d EASA Type Certicate Data Sheet
  9. ^ AW139M
  10. ^ a b Flight International "Italy fields first of 10 search and rescue HH-193As", 20–26 March 2012
  11. ^ Interim statement A002/2010 - Accident involving an AgustaWestland AW139, registration EC-KYR, operated by INAER, off the Almeria coast, on 21 January 2010, at 19:16 UTC.
  12. ^ "??". Allheadlinenews.com. http://www.allheadlinenews.com/briefs/articles/90036132?Rescue%20operation%20underway%20for%20missing%20South%20Korean%20maritime%20helicopter. Retrieved 2012-09-14.[dead link]
  13. ^ [1][dead link]
  14. ^ Azerbaijan Airlines Orders Ten AgustaWestland Helicopters
  15. ^ "The Air Force Equipment Of The Cypriot National Guard". defencegreece.com. http://www.defencegreece.com/index.php/2011/08/the-air-force-equipment-of-the-cypriot-national-guard/. Retrieved 2012-12-06.
  16. ^ "Egyptian Air Force orders AW139 helicopters". http://brahmand.com/news/Egyptian-Air-Force-orders-AW139-helicopters/7061/1/24.html. Retrieved 2012-12-06.
  17. ^ "AgustaWestland delivers AW139 to Egyptian Air Force". http://www.arabianaerospace.aero/agustawestland-delivers-aw139-to-egyptian-air-force.html. Retrieved 2012-12-06.
  18. ^ Hoyle Flight International 11–17 December 2012, p. 53.
  19. ^ Mitilian, Vatche. "News". The Independent Guide To The Lebanese Air Force. Archived from the original on 2 February 2009. http://lebaneseairforce.info/news.htm. Retrieved 2008-12-26.
  20. ^ Hoyle Flight International 11–17 December 2012, p. 58.
  21. ^ "Royal Thai Army signs for two AW139s". http://helihub.com/2012/10/09/royal-thai-army-signs-for-two-aw139s/. Retrieved 2012-12-06.
  22. ^ a b Hoyle Flight International 11–17 December 2012, p. 61.
  23. ^ "Trinidad and Tobago Defence Force/Air Guard". http://www.scramble.nl/mil/8/trinidadtobago/orbat.htm. Retrieved 2012-12-06.
  24. ^ Hoyle Flight International 11–17 December 2012, p. 64.
  25. ^ "Malaysia maritime agency receives three AW139 helicopters". http://www.flightglobal.com/articles/2010/12/14/350863/malaysia-maritime-agency-receives-three-aw139-helicopters.html. Retrieved 14 December 2012.

Bibliography

External links