Adam Stern

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Adam Stern
Adam Stern.jpg
Outfielder
Born: (1980-02-12) February 12, 1980 (age 34)
London, Ontario
Batted: LeftThrew: Right
MLB debut
July 7, 2005 for the Boston Red Sox
Last MLB appearance
May 31, 2010 for the Milwaukee Brewers
Career statistics
(through May 16, 2010)
Batting average.135
Home runs1
Runs batted in6
Teams
 
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For the American conductor, see Adam Stern (conductor).
Adam Stern
Adam Stern.jpg
Outfielder
Born: (1980-02-12) February 12, 1980 (age 34)
London, Ontario
Batted: LeftThrew: Right
MLB debut
July 7, 2005 for the Boston Red Sox
Last MLB appearance
May 31, 2010 for the Milwaukee Brewers
Career statistics
(through May 16, 2010)
Batting average.135
Home runs1
Runs batted in6
Teams

Adam James Stern (born February 12, 1980) is a Canadian former Major League Baseball outfielder. Stern is the second Jewish player from Canada in major league history, following Goody Rosen. He, Kevin Youkilis, and Gabe Kapler set a record for most Jewish players on a team at once since the expansion era.[1]

Early life and college career[edit]

Stern was born in London, Ontario. He is Jewish on his father's side.[2] Stern's sport interests in his youth were track and field, volleyball, and baseball.[3]

Stern played for the London Badgers Baseball Club in London, Ontario from the age of 16 to the age of 18.

Stern played three years on a baseball scholarship at the University of Nebraska, from which he graduated with a Sociology degree. He hit .356 as a sophomore in 2000 to earn 2nd-Team All-Big 12 honors. In 2001, he appeared in the College World Series, and was named First-Team Academic All-Big 12, as well as an All-Big 12 Honorable Mention, after hitting .292 with 68 runs and 27 stolen bases in 64 games.

He was drafted twice: first, by the Toronto Blue Jays in the 22nd round of the 1998 draft (651st overall), and then by the Atlanta Braves in the 3rd round of the 2001 draft (105th overall), before moving to the Boston Red Sox in 2004 as a Rule 5 Draft pick.

Minor league career[edit]

In 2002, Stern stole 40 bases in 48 attempts for Myrtle Beach in the Carolina League.

In 2004, Stern started in left field for the Southern League's Eastern Division All-Star team, and was named an outfielder on the league's year-end All-Star club. He hit .322 with 64 runs, 26 doubles, and 27 stolen bases in 102 games. He ranked 3rd in the league in hitting, 8th with a .378 on-base percentage, and 9th with a .480 slugging percentage. His 27 steals were 3rd-most in the Braves system, and he had 41 multi-hit games in 99 starts. He was named Atlanta's Double-A Player of the Year. Stern missed 26 games to play for Team Canada at the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens, where he hit .250 (8-for-32) with 4 RBIs and 9 runs in 9 games.

The Boston Red Sox made Stern a Rule 5 draft selection from the Braves in 2004. In 2005, he batted .321 (26-for-81) with 8 doubles, 14 RBIs, and 3 steals during a pair of rehab stints with Pawtucket, including a 21-game hitting streak.

In 2009, while playing for the Huntsville Stars, as of July 9 Stern was second in the Southern League in steals (27), runs (58), and triples (6), and third in hits (95).[4] Stern was selected to be a starting right fielder for the Southern League North Division All Star team, with the game to be played July 14 in Birmingham.[5] Promoted to Nashville, he batted .310.[1]

In 2010, he batted .325/.399/.462 for Nashville, in 86 games.[2]

Major league career[edit]

Boston Red Sox (2005–06)[edit]

Stern made his major league debut with the Red Sox on July 7, 2005. His debut was delayed first by a fractured right thumb he sustained while sliding in spring training, then by a hamstring injury.

On August 8, 2005, while playing for the Red Sox, Stern took the field in the 9th inning along with Kevin Youkilis and Gabe Kapler, setting a "record" for the most Jewish players on the field at one time in American League history and the most in Major League Baseball history since four Jews took the field for the New York Giants in a game in 1941.[6]

He played all three outfield positions in 2005, but was used primarily in right field. Due to injuries in 2005, Stern fell short of the time Rule 5 picks are required to be on a 25-man major league roster. After spending 18 days on the roster to start the 2006 season (during which he made a game-saving catch against the Devil Rays), as required to fulfill his Rule 5 obligations, Stern was optioned to Pawtucket on April 20.[7] With the Red Sox, he again played all three outfield positions in 2006, but was used primarily in center field.

Over the first two years of his major league career, he played errorless defense with better than average range at each position.[8]

Baltimore Orioles (2007–08)[edit]

On October 3, 2006, Stern passed through waivers and was traded by the Red Sox to the Baltimore Orioles to complete a deal for catcher Javy López and cash.

In January 2007, Stern reached a one-year deal with the Orioles.[9] Limited to 14 games in spring training, because of a strained right oblique muscle and a bout of food poisoning, Stern was 5–18 with 3 walks, 3 strikeouts, and 3 stolen bases in 3 attempts.[10] On March 28, the Orioles optioned Stern to the Triple-A Norfolk Tides. Norfolk vice president Jim Duquette noted, "With Stern, we didn't feel like we had the opportunity to see an awful lot of him, and we feel like he needs more time down in the minor leagues. He was one of the guys we were talking about all spring."[11]

On April 17, he was called up for the first time to the Baltimore Orioles, after outfielder Corey Patterson was placed on the bereavement list.[12] He made two appearances and played only three innings as a defensive replacement, without getting an at bat before returning to the minors.[12] He was released by the Orioles on June 10, 2008.[12]

Milwaukee Brewers (2009–10)[edit]

Stern signed a minor league contract with the Milwaukee Brewers in January 2009. Stern had an excellent spring, batting .432 with 12 RBIs and 6 stolen bases in 42 at bats.[13] He said: "You try to put together a good spring so they'll notice."[13] "He had a good spring for us," said general manager Doug Melvin. "He was swinging the bat good (in Nashville). He can do a lot of things. He gets after it pretty good."[13]

He was called up to the active roster on May 11, 2010, from AAA Nashville where he was batting .349 in 12 games when Carlos Gómez was placed on the disabled list.[13][14] He said: "Any time you get to put a big league uniform on you look forward to it. I'm excited for the opportunity."[15]

He made his first appearance for the Brewers on May 14.[16] It was his first appearance playing in the majors since the 2007 season, and his first at bat since the 2006 season.[15][16] He said: "I'm just happy that they gave me an opportunity to get back to the big leagues. I know how tough it is to get back here, and that makes me appreciate it that much more."[12] Stern filed for free agency following the conclusion of the 2010 season.

Team Canada[edit]

Adam Stern
Medal record
Men’s Baseball
Competitor for  Canada
Baseball World Cup
Bronze2009 NettunoNational team

On March 8, 2006, Stern had a superb game for Team Canada against the United States in the first World Baseball Classic, just a double short of hitting for the cycle, including an inside-the-park home run, and driving in 4 runs. He also made a couple of excellent catches in center field. Canada won the game 8–6, pulling off the biggest upset of the tournament. In the series, he batted 6 for 9.[17]

In January 2007, he was awarded the first Stubby Clapp Award at the fifth annual Baseball Canada fund raiser. The award goes to a player who shows desire, competitiveness, and a never-say-die attitude.[18]

In March 2008, he played for Team Canada in Taiwan as they competed in an 8-team tournament for a berth in the 2008 Summer Olympics. They won one of the three tickets to the Summer Games, joining Taiwan and South Korea.[19] At the Olympics, Stern was Team Canada's center fielder for all seven of its games, playing errorless defence and chipping in with four hits, including a pair of triples and three RBIs. He was the second-highest scorer on the team, with four runs.[20]

In March 2009, Stern played for Team Canada in the 2009 World Baseball Classic.

Post-playing career[edit]

In 2013, Stern rejoined the Red Sox as a scout based in his home city of London, Ontario.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Celebrity Jewish Baseball from". jweekly. August 26, 2005. Retrieved March 18, 2010. 
  2. ^ Roch Kubatko (February 21, 2007). "Q&a // Adam Stern". Baltimore Sun. Retrieved May 25, 2014. 
  3. ^ "Olympic experience thrills Canadian Jewish ballplayer". Jewish Tribune. September 16, 2004. Archived from the original on January 22, 2005. Retrieved August 4, 2011. 
  4. ^ "Minor League Statistics". minorleaguebaseball.com. Retrieved March 18, 2010. 
  5. ^ "Stern, Justis, and Lucroy Named All-Star Starters". OurSports Central. July 1, 2009. Retrieved March 18, 2010. 
  6. ^ "It started as a great idea, then fate stepped in." Jewish Tribune. September 29, 2005. Retrieved on January 16, 2009.
  7. ^ Beach, Jerry. "Rule 5 Primer." Scout.com. December 5, 2007. Retrieved on January 16, 2009.
  8. ^ "Adam Stern Statistics." Baseball-Reference. Retrieved on January 16, 2009.
  9. ^ "Four Members Of 2006 Baysox Invited To Major League Camp With Orioles." Bowie Baysox. January 31, 2007. Retrieved on January 16, 2009.
  10. ^ "Baltimore Orioles Hitting Stats, Spring Training 2008." Major League Baseball. Retrieved on January 16, 2009.
  11. ^ "Topic Galleries." Baltimore Sun. Retrieved on January 16, 2009.
  12. ^ a b c d "Macha responds to Fielder's frustration". MLB.com. April 17, 2010. Archived from the original on May 21, 2010. Retrieved May 17, 2010. 
  13. ^ a b c d Haudricourt, Tom (May 11, 2010). "Braun to miss second game with injury". JSOnline. Retrieved May 17, 2010. 
  14. ^ "Adam Stern". Jewish Baseball News. Retrieved May 17, 2010. 
  15. ^ a b "Edmonds hopes to avoid DL stint". MLB.com. May 16, 2010. Archived from the original on May 21, 2010. Retrieved May 17, 2010. 
  16. ^ a b "Canadian MLB report: Francis impresses in big league return". Tsn.ca. September 12, 2008. Retrieved May 17, 2010. 
  17. ^ Doug Miller (January 19, 2009). "Classic rosters stacked with star power". MLB.com. Retrieved March 18, 2010. 
  18. ^ Elliott, Bob. "Stern named Clapp winner." London Free Press Retrieved on January 16, 2009.
  19. ^ "Hitting all the right notes."[dead link] Toronto Sun.
  20. ^ "Olympians at Baseball Hall of Fame fundraiser." Stratford Gazette. Retrieved on January 16, 2009.

External links[edit]