Adam Rippon

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Adam Rippon
Adam Rippon 2009 TEB.jpg
Rippon on the 2009 Trophée Eric Bompard podium.
Personal information
Full nameAdam Rippon
Country representedUnited States
Born(1989-11-11) November 11, 1989 (age 24)
Scranton, Pennsylvania
Home townClarks Summit, Pennsylvania
Height1.72 m (5 ft 8 in)
CoachRafael Arutyunyan
Former coachJason Dungjen
Yuka Sato
Brian Orser
Nikolai Morozov
Yelena Sergeeva
ChoreographerMichael Seibert
Former choreographerShae-Lynn Bourne
Pasquale Camerlengo
David Wilson
Sébastien Britten
Nikolai Morozov
Olga Orlova
Yelena Sergeeva
Skating clubSkating Club of New York
Training locationsBloomfield Hills, Michigan
Former training locationsToronto, Hackensack, New Jersey
Began skatingNovember 1999
World standing11 (As of 16 June 2011 (2011-06-16))[1]
Season's bests18 (2011–2012)[2]
7 (2010–2011)[3]
11 (2009–2010)[4]
11 (2008–2009)[5]
ISU personal best scores
Combined total241.24
2013 Skate America
Short program82.25
2013 NHK Trophy
Free skate160.98
2013 Skate America
 
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Adam Rippon
Adam Rippon 2009 TEB.jpg
Rippon on the 2009 Trophée Eric Bompard podium.
Personal information
Full nameAdam Rippon
Country representedUnited States
Born(1989-11-11) November 11, 1989 (age 24)
Scranton, Pennsylvania
Home townClarks Summit, Pennsylvania
Height1.72 m (5 ft 8 in)
CoachRafael Arutyunyan
Former coachJason Dungjen
Yuka Sato
Brian Orser
Nikolai Morozov
Yelena Sergeeva
ChoreographerMichael Seibert
Former choreographerShae-Lynn Bourne
Pasquale Camerlengo
David Wilson
Sébastien Britten
Nikolai Morozov
Olga Orlova
Yelena Sergeeva
Skating clubSkating Club of New York
Training locationsBloomfield Hills, Michigan
Former training locationsToronto, Hackensack, New Jersey
Began skatingNovember 1999
World standing11 (As of 16 June 2011 (2011-06-16))[1]
Season's bests18 (2011–2012)[2]
7 (2010–2011)[3]
11 (2009–2010)[4]
11 (2008–2009)[5]
ISU personal best scores
Combined total241.24
2013 Skate America
Short program82.25
2013 NHK Trophy
Free skate160.98
2013 Skate America

Adam Rippon (born November 11, 1989) is an American figure skater. He is the 2010 Four Continents champion, the 2012 U.S. silver medalist, the 2008 and 2009 World Junior champion, the 2008 U.S. junior national champion, and the 2007–2008 Junior Grand Prix Final champion.

Personal life[edit]

Adam Rippon was born in Scranton, Pennsylvania. He is the eldest of six children.[6] Rippon was born deaf but underwent surgery at Yale University when he was young which allows him to hear almost perfectly. He started to skate at age ten because his mother skated and brought him along to the rink.[7][8]

Career[edit]

Early career[edit]

Rippon started to skate at age 10 because his mother skated and brought him along to the rink. He was coached by Yelena Sergeeva from 2000–2007.[9]

In the 2004–2005 season, Adam Rippon won the silver medal on the novice level at the 2005 U.S. Championships.

In the 2005–2006 season, Rippon debuted on the ISU Junior Grand Prix circuit. He competed at the 2005–2006 ISU Junior Grand Prix event in Croatia and placed 6th. He was not assigned to a second Junior Grand Prix event. At the 2006 U.S. Championships, he finished 11th at the junior level. In the 2006–2007 season, Rippon did not compete on the Junior Grand Prix circuit. He placed 6th on the junior level at the 2007 U.S. Championships. Following the event, he left Sergeeva and began working with Nikolai Morozov in February 2007 at the Ice House in Hackensack, New Jersey.[7][10]

2007–2008 season[edit]

In the 2007–2008 season, Rippon competed on the 2007–2008 ISU Junior Grand Prix circuit. At his first event, the Harghita Cup in Miercurea Ciuc, Romania, he won the gold medal. He then won the silver medal at the Sofia Cup in Sofia, Bulgaria. These two medals qualified him for the 2007–2008 Junior Grand Prix Final. At that event, Rippon won the gold medal, and became the first man to break 200 points at a Junior level competition.

He went on to the 2008 U.S. Championships, where he won the Junior title.[11] The Professional Skaters Association recognized Rippon as having the best men's free skate.[12] He earned a trip to the 2008 Junior Worlds, where he won the gold medal.[10] He was the second American man in a row to win the title, after Stephen Carriere, and the first man in years to win that title without attempting a triple axel jump.[citation needed]

2008–2009 Season[edit]

Rippon moved up to the senior level in the 2008–2009 season. In the Grand Prix season he was assigned to compete at the 2008 Skate America where he placed eighth, and the 2008 Cup of Russia where he placed third in the short program and fifth overall. In late November 2008, Rippon left Morozov. In December 2008, he moved to Toronto, Canada to begin training with Brian Orser at the Toronto Cricket, Skating & Curling Club.[13] Rippon officially announced his coaching change on January 2, 2009.[14]

At the 2009 U.S. Championships, his senior level national debut, he placed seventh. He was named to the team for the 2009 Junior World Championships. At Junior Worlds, in his two programs, he landed a total of three triple axel jumps, one in combination with a double toe loop. He won the competition overall, scoring 222.00 points, becoming the first single skater to win two World Junior titles.[15]

2009–2010 season[edit]

Rippon sprained his ankle during the summer and missed some training time.[16] For the 2009–2010 season, Rippon was assigned to two Grand Prix events. At the 2009 Trophée Eric Bompard, he landed a triple flip-triple toe loop combination, a triple axel and a triple lutz in the short program and placed third in that segment of the competition.[17] In the free skate, he landed a triple flip-triple toe loop combination, a triple axel-double toe loop combination, a triple loop, a triple axel, a triple lutz, a triple lutz-double toe loop-double loop combination, a double axel and a triple salchow to place third in that segment of the competition.[18] Rippon won the bronze medal with a total score of 219.96 points.

At the 2009 NHK Trophy, Rippon placed eighth in the short program with a score of 67.15, after falling on the triple axel. He placed fifth in the free skate with a score of 130.46, completing seven triples including the triple axel in combination.[19] Rippon placed sixth overall with a total score of 197.61 points.

At the 2010 U.S. Championships, he placed fourth in the short program with a score of 72.91 points after doubling with his triple lutz and falling in his footwork sequence. In the free skate, he completed eight triples and placed fourth in that segment of the competition with a score of 152.16 points.[20] He finished fifth overall earning 225.07 points. Rippon was assigned to the 2010 Four Continents Championships.[21]

At the 2010 Four Continents Championships, he placed seventh in the short program with a score of 69.56 points. In the free skate, he completed a triple flip-triple toe loop combination, a triple axel-double toe loop combination, a triple loop, a triple axel, a triple lutz, a triple lutz-double toe loop-double loop combination, a double axel and a downgraded triple salchow to place first in that segment of that competition.[22] He won the gold medal with a total score of 225.78 points.

Rippon competed at the 2010 World Championships. He placed seventh in the short program with 80.11 points after landing a triple flip-triple toe loop combination, a triple axel and a triple lutz. In the free skate he came in fifth place with 231.47 points after executing triple flip-triple toe loop combination, a triple axel-double toe loop combination, a triple loop, a triple axel, a triple lutz, a triple lutz-double toe loop-double loop combination, a double axel and a triple salchow. Overall he placed sixth with 231.47 points.

2010–2011 season[edit]

Rippon began his season at the Japan Open, where he finished ahead of Daisuke Takahashi and Evgeni Plushenko.[23] His assigned Grand Prix events for the 2010–2011 ISU Grand Prix season were the 2010 Skate Canada International and the 2010 Skate America.[24]

At the 2010 Skate Canada International, Rippon had a collision with Patrick Chan during the morning practice before the short program but stated, "That was definitely the most exciting collision, maybe not the most dangerous."[25] He placed third in the short program with 77.53 points after executing a triple axel, a triple flip-triple toe loop combination and a triple lutz. He placed second in the free skate earning 155.51 points nailing a triple axel-double toe loop combination, a double axel, a triple lutz, a triple flip-triple toe loop combination, a triple lutz-double toe loop-double loop combination, a triple loop and a triple salchow but stepping out of his second triple axel. He won the bronze medal overall scoring 233.04 points, a new personal best.

At the 2010 Skate America, Rippon placed third in the short program with 73.94 points. He stepped out of his triple axel, but executed a triple flip-triple toe loop combination, a triple lutz and all his spins were graded a level four.

At the 2011 U.S. Championships, Rippon finished 5th and was assigned to the 2011 Four Continents but missed the World team. He was also 5th at Four Continents.

On April 1, 2011, Rippon announced he would no longer be coached by Orser but would remain at the same club coached by Ghislain Briand, with whom he had already worked for over two years.[9][26] On June 16, 2011, Rippon announced he was leaving Toronto to train with Jason Dungjen at the Detroit Skating Club in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, having been impressed with the facilities while working with DCS-based choreographer Pasquale Camerlengo.[23][27][28] While looking for an apartment, he stayed with his friend Alissa Czisny.[29] During the off-season, he worked on a quad lutz.[29][30]

2011–2012 season[edit]

In the 2011–2012 season, Rippon was assigned to 2011 Skate Canada and 2011 Trophée Eric Bompard as his Grand Prix events. He opened the season with a 4th place finish at Skate Canada. This competition marked Rippon's first attempt at including a quad jump in his free program. He was unsuccessful with the quad lutz attempt. At Trophée Bompard, he was 4th in the short program, 3rd in the long, and finished 4th overall. Rippon won the silver medal at the 2012 U.S. Championships. He finished 4th at Four Continents and 13th at Worlds.

2012–2013 season[edit]

In September 2012, Rippon announced a coaching change, moving to train with Rafael Arutyunyan in Lake Arrowhead, California.[31][32] At the 2012 Cup of China, Rippon collided with China's Song Nan – who sustained a concussion and withdrew – a minute into the final warm up before the free skate.[33][34] Rippon said, "I kind of turned around to go into a jump and I think when Nan Song and I saw each other we both tried to avoid each other, but we went in the same way and we went head first into each other."[33] Rippon finished 4th at the event and 8th at the 2012 NHK Trophy. At the 2013 U.S. Championships, he landed three triple Axels and finished 5th.[35] He was assigned to the 2013 Four Continents but withdrew after sustaining an ankle injury on February 2, 2013.[36]

2013-2014[edit]

In October 2013, Rippon competed at the 2013 Skate America. He was third in both the short and the free, setting personal bests in both. It was enough to win the silver medal, 25 points behind the winner, Japanese Tatsuki Machida. It is his highest placement in a GP event to date.

Signature moves[edit]

Rippon's signature move is a triple lutz that he executes with both arms on his head, colloquially dubbed the "Rippon Lutz".[37][38] He is capable of performing the triple lutz-double toe loop-double loop combination with one hand over his head in all three jumps (colloquially the "'Tano Lutz" after Brian Boitano, who invented the move). He is also one of the few men able to do a donut spin.

Programs[edit]

Rippon performs his short program to Jonathan Livingston Seagull at the 2010 World Figure Skating Championships.
SeasonShort programFree skatingExhibition
2012–2013The Incredibles:
2011–2012
2010–2011
2009–2010
  • Concerto for Violin and Orchestra
    by Samuel Barber
    choreo. by David Wilson
2008–2009
2007–2008
  • Toccata and Fugue in D minor
    by Johann Sebastian Bach
    choreo. by Nikolai Morozov

  • I'll Still be Diggin' On James Brown
    by Tubes in Town
    choreo. by Nikolai Morozov
2006–2007
2005–2006
  • Just for You
    by Giovanni
    choreo. by Yelena Segeeva
2004–2005
2003–2004
2002–2003

Competitive highlights[edit]

Rippon (center) at the 2007–08 Junior Grand Prix Final podium.
Results[41]
International
Event2002–032003–042004–052005–062006–072007–082008–092009–102010–112011–122012–132013-14
Worlds6th13th
Four Continents1st5th4thWD
GP Bompard3rd4th
GP Cup of China4th
GP NHK Trophy6th8th4th
GP Rostelecom5th
GP Skate America8th4th2nd
GP Skate Canada3rd4th
International: Junior
Junior Worlds1st1st
JGP Final1st
JGP Bulgaria2nd
JGP Croatia6th
JGP Romania1st
Triglav1st J.
National
U.S. Champ.2nd N.11th J.6th J.1st J.7th5th5th2nd5th
U.S. Jr. Ch.7th Ju.6th I.
East. Sect.1st N.3rd J.1st J.
SA Regionals4th Ju.4th I.4th N.1st J.1st J.
Team events
Japan Open2T / 1P
GP = Grand Prix; JGP = Junior Grand Prix; WD = Withdrew
Levels: Ju. = Juvenile; I. = Intermediate; N. = Novice; J. = Junior
SA Regionals = South Atlantic Regionals
T = Team result; P = Personal result; Medals awarded for team result only.

Detailed results[edit]

Post-2009[edit]

2012–2013 season
DateEventSPFSTotal
January 17 – 29, 20132013 United States Figure Skating Championships6
76.65
6
153.22
5
229.87
January 22 – 30, 20112012 ISU Grand Prix NHK Trophy8
67.89
8
142.58
8
210.47
November 11–14, 20102012 ISU Grand Prix Cup of China4
71.81
4
133.67
4
205.48
2010–2011 season
DateEventSPFSTotal
February 15 – 20, 20112011 ISU Four Continents Championships4
72.71
5
137.30
5
210.01
January 22 – 30, 20112011 United States Figure Skating Championships9
66.26
3
153.78
5
220.04
November 11–14, 20102010 ISU Grand Prix Skate America3
73.94
7
129.18
4
203.12
October 28–31, 20102010 ISU Grand Prix Skate Canada3
77.53
2
155.51
3
233.04
October 2, 2010Japan Open (individual)1
166.63
2009–2010 season
DateEventSPFSTotal
March 22–28, 20102010 ISU World Championships7
80.11
5
151.36
6
231.47
January 25 – 31, 20102010 ISU Four Continents Championships7
69.56
1
156.22
1
225.78
January 14–24, 20102010 United States Figure Skating Championships4
72.91
4
152.16
5
225.07
November 5–8, 20092009 ISU Grand Prix NHK Trophy8
67.15
5
130.46
6
197.61
October 15–18, 20092009 ISU Grand Prix Trophée Eric Bompard3
75.82
3
144.14
3
219.96

Pre-2009[edit]

2008–2009 season
DateEventLevelSPFSTotal
February 23 – March 1,
2009
2009 ISU World Junior ChampionshipsJunior1
74.30
1
147.70
1
222.00
January 18–25, 20092009 United States Figure Skating ChampionshipsSenior12
62.22
6
131.54
7
193.76
November 21–23, 20082008 ISU Grand Prix Cup of RussiaSenior3
71.62
5
136.31
5
207.93
October 23–26, 20082008 ISU Grand Prix Skate AmericaSenior8
59.60
7
115.22
8
174.82
2007–2008 season
DateEventLevelSPFSTotal
February 25 – March 2,
2008
2008 ISU World Junior ChampionshipsJunior1
69.35
1
130.55
1
199.90
January 20–27, 20082008 United States Figure Skating ChampionshipsJunior1
71.33
1
142.43
1
213.76
December 6–9, 20072007–2008 ISU Junior Grand Prix FinalJunior1
68.43
1
134.77
1
203.20
October 3–6, 20072007 ISU Junior Grand Prix, BulgariaJunior1
64.41
2
123.26
2
187.67
September 6–9, 20072007 ISU Junior Grand Prix, RomaniaJunior1
64.61
1
121.33
1
185.94
2006–2007 season
DateEventLevelSPFSTotal
January 21–28, 20072007 United States Figure Skating ChampionshipsJunior7
52.82
7
105.68
6
158.50
November 16–18, 20062007 Eastern Sectional ChampionshipsJunior1
60.81
1
116.88
1
177.69
October 16–21, 20062007 South Atlantic Regional ChampionshipsJunior1
50.85
1
88.59
139.44
2005–2006 season
DateEventLevelSPFSTotal
January 7–15, 20062006 United States Figure Skating ChampionshipsJunior8
49.54
12
84.65
11
134.19
October 6–9, 20052005 ISU Junior Grand Prix, CroatiaJunior6
48.85
5
97.72
6
146.57
November 16–19, 20052006 Eastern Sectional ChampionshipsJunior3
52.39
2
98.89
3
151.28
October 26–29, 20052006 South Atlantic Regional ChampionshipsJunior111
2004–2005 season
DateEventLevelSPFSTotal
April 13–17, 20052005 Triglav TrophyJunior411
January 9–16, 20052005 United States Figure Skating ChampionshipsNovice122
November 18–20, 20042005 Eastern Sectional ChampionshipsNovice111
October 5–9, 20042005 South Atlantic Regional ChampionshipsNovice244

References[edit]

  1. ^ "ISU World Standings for Single & Pair Skating and Ice Dance : Men". International Skating Union. June 16, 2011. Archived from the original on July 13, 2011. Retrieved June 18, 2011 2011. 
  2. ^ "ISU Judging System – Season Bests Total Scores 2011/2012 : Men". International Skating Union. March 31, 2012. Retrieved April 16, 2012. 
  3. ^ "ISU Judging System – Season Bests Total Scores 2010/2011 : Men". International Skating Union. April 28, 2011. Archived from the original on July 13, 2011. Retrieved June 18, 2011. 
  4. ^ "ISU Judging System – Season Bests Total Scores 2009/2010 : Men". International Skating Union. March 25, 2010. Retrieved June 18, 2011. 
  5. ^ "ISU Judging System – Season Bests Total Scores 2008/2009 : Men". International Skating Union. April 18, 2009. Retrieved June 18, 2011. 
  6. ^ "Adam Rippon poised to be the next big star". lifeskate.com. September 26, 2010. Archived from the original on September 29, 2010. Retrieved September 28, 2010. 
  7. ^ a b Mittan, Barry (December 11, 2007). "Rippon Rips Up Competition". SkateToday. 
  8. ^ Lozano, Silvia (2010). "Adam Rippon: "If you can do it with one arm, why not two!". AbsoluteSkating.com. Retrieved December 22, 2010. 
  9. ^ a b "Rippon ends professional relationship with Orser". USFSA (icenetwork). April 1, 2011. Retrieved April 1, 2011. 
  10. ^ a b Mittan, Barry (April 12, 2008). "Adam Rippon: Now He Belongs". GoldenSkate.com. Retrieved December 22, 2010. 
  11. ^ Staed, Becca (January 25, 2008). "Adam Rippon wins junior men's gold". IceNetwork.com. Retrieved December 22, 2010. 
  12. ^ Six Skaters Honored with PSA Edi Awards
  13. ^ International Figure Skating online, January 1, 2009: "Adam Rippon: A Happy New Year Dawns"
  14. ^ U.S. Figure Skating press release, January 2, 2009: "2008 World Junior Champion Adam Rippon Announces Coaching Change"
  15. ^ "ISU World Junior Figure Skating Championships 2009, Day 3". International Skating Union. February 26, 2009. Retrieved October 29, 2009. 
  16. ^ Golinsky, Reut (2009). "Adam Rippon: "It's good to meet the challenge early in the season"". AbsoluteSkating.com. Retrieved December 22, 2010. 
  17. ^ "ISU GP Trophee Eric Bompard MEN SHORT PROGRAM JUDGES DETAILS PER SKATER" (PDF). International Skating Union. October 16, 2009. Retrieved February 8, 2010. 
  18. ^ "ISU GP Trophee Eric Bompard MEN FREE SKATING JUDGES DETAILS PER SKATER" (PDF). International Skating Union. October 17, 2009. Retrieved February 8, 2010. 
  19. ^ "ISU GP NHK Trophy 2009 MEN FREE SKATING JUDGES DETAILS PER SKATER" (PDF). International Skating Union. November 7, 2009. Retrieved February 8, 2010. 
  20. ^ "2010 US Figure Skating Championships Championship Men Free Skate Judges' Details". U.S. Figure Skating. January 17, 2010. Archived from the original on January 20, 2010. Retrieved February 8, 2010. 
  21. ^ "U.S. Figure Skating Announces Men Nominated to 2010 U.S. Olympic Figure Skating Team". U.S. Figure Skating. January 17, 2010. Retrieved January 18, 2010. 
  22. ^ "ISU Four Continents Figure Skating Championships MEN FREE SKATING JUDGES DETAILS PER SKATER" (PDF). International Skating Union. January 30, 2010. Retrieved February 8, 2010. 
  23. ^ a b c d Russell, Susan D. (September 7, 2011). "Adam Rippon Heads in a New Direction". IFS Magazine. Retrieved September 8, 2011. 
  24. ^ Brannen, Sarah S. (June 28, 2010). "Rippon to get romantic in upcoming season". IceNetwork.com. Retrieved December 22, 2010. 
  25. ^ "Reynolds makes history, Chan stumbles at Skate Canada". The Canadian Press (TSN). October 29, 2010. Archived from the original on November 30, 2010. Retrieved November 22, 2010. 
  26. ^ Rutherford, Lynn (April 8, 2011). "Rippon talks recent coaching change, quads". Icenetwork. Retrieved April 10, 2011. 
  27. ^ "Rippon enlists Jason Dungjen as new coach". U.S. Figure Skating (Universal Sports). June 15, 2011. Retrieved June 15, 2011. 
  28. ^ Kany, Klaus-Reinhold; Rutherford, Lynn (August 19, 2011). "Summer Notebook: Rockin' the ice in Detroit". icenetwork. Retrieved August 20, 2011. 
  29. ^ a b Rosewater, Amy (January 19, 2012). "Rippon gets by with a little help from his friend". Ice Network. Retrieved January 19, 2012. 
  30. ^ Rutherford, Lynn (August 26, 2011). "Top U.S. men talk quads at Champs Camp". Icenetwork. Retrieved August 27, 2011. 
  31. ^ "Rippon Announces Coaching Change". U.S. Figure Skating. September 11, 2012. 
  32. ^ Rosewater, Ice Network (September 12, 2012). "Rippon chooses Arutunian for aggressive style". 
  33. ^ a b Flade, Tatjana (November 4, 2012). "Machida upsets Takahashi at 2012 Cup of China". Golden Skate. 
  34. ^ "Machida stuns Takahashi in Cup of China triumph". International Skating Union (IceNetwork). November 3, 2012. 
  35. ^ Rutherford, Lynn (February 1, 2013). "Rippon likes training "up the mountain"". Icenetwork. 
  36. ^ "Richard Dornbush Set to Compete at 2013 Four Continents Championships". U.S. Figure Skating. February 4, 2013. 
  37. ^ Brannen, Sarah S.; Meekins, Drew (February 20, 2010). "Rippon talks Kim, Olympics and Four C's win". IceNetwork.com. Retrieved December 22, 2010. 
  38. ^ Herrmann, Suzanne (November 14, 2010). "Adam Rippon: "I feel like I’m one of the luckiest skaters."". AbsoluteSkating.com. Retrieved December 22, 2010. 
  39. ^ Rutherford, Lynn (August 24, 2012). "Abbott goes 007, not worried about Lysacek, Weir". Icenetwork. 
  40. ^ Rutherford, Lynn (May 23, 2012). "Rippon plans to skate like an absolute mad man". Ice Network. 
  41. ^ "Competition Results: Adam RIPPON". International Skating Union. 

External links[edit]