Abadazad

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Abadazad

Cover to Abadazad #1
Publication information
PublisherCrossGen Entertainment, inc.
ScheduleMonthly
Publication dateMarch 2004 - May 2004
Number of issues3
Creative team
Writer(s)J.M.DeMatteis
Penciller(s)Mike Ploog
Colorist(s)Nick Bell
 
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Abadazad

Cover to Abadazad #1
Publication information
PublisherCrossGen Entertainment, inc.
ScheduleMonthly
Publication dateMarch 2004 - May 2004
Number of issues3
Creative team
Writer(s)J.M.DeMatteis
Penciller(s)Mike Ploog
Colorist(s)Nick Bell

Abadazad is an American comic book written by J.M.DeMatteis and drawn by Mike Ploog, with color by Nick Bell. Published in 2004 by Crossgen Comics to rave reviews,[1] the series halted when Crossgen went out of business. Abadazad was co-owned by DeMatteis, Ploog, and CrossGen but in the stories the historical author is Franklin O. Davies.

Disney acquired Abadazad along with the rest of CrossGen's intellectual property[2] and, in June 2006, the story was reborn in a unique hybrid format: a children's book series that combines diary entries, full-page illustrations, and sequential art. At least eight Abadazad volumes were originally planned, though only three volumes were published and all further volumes cancelled.

Contents

Story

Abadazad is a magical land that Kate Jameson—a surly, cynical fourteen-year-old child—has only known through a series of famous fantasy novels written a century ago by one Franklin O. Davies. When Kate suddenly finds herself journeying through the real Abadazad in search of her beloved younger brother, Matt—who vanished five years earlier—she discovers that the truth of Abadazad is far stranger, and more amazing, than fiction. She is guided to enter Abadazad by Little Martha, the protagonist of the novels which she had read, and is given cause to confront the villain known as Lanky Man, to whom is ascribed the disappearance of Matt.

Book Series

  1. Abadazad: The Road to Inconceivable (June 2006)
  2. Abadazad: The Dream Thief (June 2006)
  3. Abadazad: The Puppet, the Professor, and the Prophet (July 2007, UK only)
  4. Abadazad: Historcery'’ (cancelled)

Book 3, originally scheduled for US publication, appeared only in Great Britain, while Book 4 did not appear at all. The synopsis for Book 4 from Amazon.UK reads as follows: "A groundbreaking mix of fiction and full-colour comic strip that follows a headstrong girl's journey into the bizarre fictional world of Abadazad to rescue her brother. In 'Historcery', Kate has finally gathered the group of friends she hopes will help her to rescue her brother Matt from the evil Lanky Man: the walking candle Master Wix, Professor Headstrong, the puppet Mary Annette and Mr Glum."

Although he and artist Mike Ploog originally signed up for eight volumes (with hopes for twelve, depending on sales), J.M. DeMatteis has posted on his blog Creation Point [3] that the Abadazad book series ended after three books with the third book not to be released in the United States. DeMatteis credits the Abadazad experience as inspiring his 2010 prose children's fantasy novel Imaginalis.

Franklin O. Davies

In the Abadazad series, Kate makes references to the "original" book series, written by Franklin O. Davies and illustrated by Arthur N. Pierson. This fictional series is heavily based on L. Frank Baum's series of Wizard of Oz books; as a result, Oz fans may find Davies' backstory very familiar.

Davies wrote "nineteen or twenty" Abadazad books, from 1898 to 1924, starting with Little Martha in Abadazad. Other titles mentioned include Queen Ija of Abadazad, The Eight Oceans of Abadazad, Professor Headstrong of Abadazad, The Enchanted Gardens of Abadazad, The Balloonicorn of Abadazad, The Edges of Abadazad, The Battle for Abadazad and The Wretchedly Awful City of Abadazad. Most of these feature Martha Cooper, a small, determined girl who possesses the means, in the form of a blue sphere, of travelling to Abadazad at will. The historical book series reveals that Martha herself had related the stories to Davies, who had written them into books, altering the appearance and characters as he thought best suited the audience. The difference between his version of Abadazad and the version Kate encounters in person is a recurring theme throughout the story. In the original Crossgen comic book, the fictitious author's name had been Franklin O. Barrie.

References

  1. ^ Abadazad #1 (Line of Fire Reviews), by Olivia Woodward, February 23, 2004
  2. ^ Brady, Matt (2004). "Disney Buys CrossGen Confirmed - Abadazad Plans Named". Newsarama. http://classic.newsarama.com/pages/CG_Disney.htm. Retrieved 7 June 2007. [dead link]
  3. ^ INTO IMAGINALIS

External links