Aaron Krickstein

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Aaron Krickstein
Country United States
ResidenceGrosse Pointe, Michigan
Born(1967-08-02) August 2, 1967 (age 46)
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Height1.82 m (6 ft 0 in)
Turned pro1983
Retired1996
PlaysRight-handed (two-handed backhand)
Prize money$3,710,447
Singles
Career record395–256
Career titles9
Highest rankingNo. 6 (February 26, 1990)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian OpenSF (1995)
French Open4R (1985, 1994)
Wimbledon4R (1989, 1995)
US OpenSF (1989)
Other tournaments
Tour FinalsRR (1989)
Doubles
Career record10–19
Career titles0
Highest rankingNo. 196 (February 25, 1985)
Last updated on: December 20, 2012.
 
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Aaron Krickstein
Country United States
ResidenceGrosse Pointe, Michigan
Born(1967-08-02) August 2, 1967 (age 46)
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Height1.82 m (6 ft 0 in)
Turned pro1983
Retired1996
PlaysRight-handed (two-handed backhand)
Prize money$3,710,447
Singles
Career record395–256
Career titles9
Highest rankingNo. 6 (February 26, 1990)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian OpenSF (1995)
French Open4R (1985, 1994)
Wimbledon4R (1989, 1995)
US OpenSF (1989)
Other tournaments
Tour FinalsRR (1989)
Doubles
Career record10–19
Career titles0
Highest rankingNo. 196 (February 25, 1985)
Last updated on: December 20, 2012.

Aaron Krickstein (born August 2, 1967), nicknamed "Marathon Man",[1] is an American former professional tennis player, who competed on the ATP Tour from 1983 to 1996. Born in Ann Arbor, Michigan,[2] he currently competes on the Outback Champions Series Over-30 tour.

Krickstein reached his career high ATP ranking of World No. 6, on February 26, 1990.[3] He achieved this ranking on the back of wins in Sydney and Los Angeles, as well as his best ever results at Wimbledon and the U.S. Open.

Personal[edit]

Krickstein is Jewish, and in the early 1990s was one of three highly ranked Jewish-American tennis players, along with Jay Berger and Brad Gilbert.[1][4][5][6][7][8] His coach Nick Bollettieri remarked as to his personality when he was a teenager: "Aaron was brought up in a Jewish background and babied for 16 years. Now his father wants me to make him Italian."[9]

His sister Kathy won the Big Ten tennis championship in 1978.[3] He is the uncle of LPGA's golfer Morgan Pressel, who is the daughter of his sister Kathy and the youngest winner of an LPGA major.[10]

Career[edit]

Junior[edit]

Krickstein started playing tennis when he was six.[9] He became an active competitor on the high school tennis scene during his teens, and still holds the Michigan record for most consecutive match wins at this level (56). He played for University Liggett School.[11]

He won the American National Under 16 championship in 1982. While still only 16, he was the US National Junior Tennis Association Champion, Clay Champion, and USTA National Champion in the 18s in 1983.[12] All in all, he won five consecutive junior championships.[9]

Professional[edit]

Krickstein set an ATP record for being the youngest player to win a singles title on the ATP Tour (at age 16, 2 months after his 16th birthday, in Tel Aviv. Krickstein set a record for being the youngest player to ever break the top 10 (at age 17).[1][4]

His best finishes in a Grand Slam event were at the 1989 US Open, and the 1995 Australian Open, where he reached the semifinals.

In 1984 he won the U.S. Pro Tennis Championship, becoming its youngest winner, and a clay court tournament in Boston.[5] In 1989 he won the Tokyo Indoor Tennis Tournament and a hard court tournament in Sydney, Australia.[5] In 1991, 1992, and 1993 he won the South African Open.[5]

He had a record of 10 career wins from 0–2 set deficits. His nickname "Marathon Man" was a reference to his ability to make a comeback when behind in a match.[1][13][14] Krickstein won 27 of his 35 career matches that went into a fifth set.

He had an injury-plagued career, which included stress fractures in his feet, problems with his knees and wrists in 1985 and 1986, and injuries suffered when he was hurt in a car accident in 1987.[15]

He defeated a number of top players, including Ivan Lendl (world #1) in 1990, Michael Stich (world #2 and #4) in 1994 and 1991, Stefan Edberg (world #3) in 1988 at the U S Open, Boris Becker (world #3) in 1992, Mats Wilander (world #4) in 1984, and Jimmy Arias (world #5) in 1984 and Sergi Bruguera (world #5) in 1994. He won against Pete Sampras and Andre Agassi.

Davis Cup[edit]

He was a member of the United States Davis Cup team from 1985–87, and also was a member of the 1990 squad. He compiled a 6–4 record in singles play during Davis Cup ties.[16] The highlight of Krickstein's Davis Cup career came in 1990 when he scored two hard-fought victories in a World Group Quarterfinal tie against Czechoslovakia, leading his team to a 4–1 win.

ATP Tour titles[edit]

Singles: 19 (9–10)[edit]

OutcomeNo.DateChampionshipSurfaceOpponentScore
Winner1.October 10, 1983Tel Aviv, IsraelHardWest Germany Christoph Zipf7–6, 6–3
Runner-up1.May 13, 1984Rome, ItalyClayEcuador Andrés Gómez6–2, 1–6, 2–6, 2–6
Winner2.July 16, 1984Boston, U.S.ClayArgentina José Luis Clerc7–6(7–2), 3–6, 6–4
Runner-up2.July 23, 1984Washington D.C., U.S.ClayEcuador Andrés Gómez2–6, 2–6
Winner3.September 10, 1984Tel Aviv, IsraelHardIsrael Shahar Perkiss6–4, 6–1
Winner4.September 17, 1984Geneva, SwitzerlandClaySweden Henrik Sundström6–7, 6–1, 6–4
Runner-up3.November 18, 1985Hong KongHardEcuador Andrés Gómez3–6, 3–6, 6–3, 4–6
Runner-up4.October 6, 1986Tel Aviv, IsraelHardUnited States Brad Gilbert5–7, 2–6
Runner-up5.October 10, 1988Tel Aviv, IsraelHardUnited States Brad Gilbert6–4, 6–7, 2–6
Runner-up6.November 14, 1988Detroit, U.S.CarpetUnited States John McEnroe5–7, 2–6
Winner5.January 9, 1989Sydney Outdoor, AustraliaHardSoviet Union Andrei Cherkasov6–4, 6–2
Winner6.September 18, 1989Los Angeles, U.S.HardUnited States Michael Chang2–6, 6–4, 6–2
Winner7.October 17, 1989Tokyo Indoor, JapanCarpetWest Germany Carl-Uwe Steeb6–2, 6–2
Runner-up7.April 9, 1990Tokyo, JapanHardSweden Stefan Edberg4–6, 5–7
Runner-up8.September 24, 1990Brisbane, AustraliaHardUnited States Brad Gilbert3–6, 1–6
Runner-up9.September 23, 1991Brisbane, AustraliaHardItaly Gianluca Pozzi3–6, 6–7(4–7)
Winner8.March 30, 1992Johannesburg, South AfricaHardRussia Alexander Volkov6–4, 6–4
Runner-up10.April 20, 1992Monte Carlo, MonacoClayAustria Thomas Muster3–6, 1–6, 3–6
Winner9.March 29, 1993Johannesburg, South Africa (2)HardSouth Africa Grant Stafford6–3, 7–6(9–7)

Singles Performance timeline[edit]

Tournament19831984198519861987198819891990199119921993199419951996SRW–L
Grand Slams
Australian OpenAAAAAA4R4R4R4RA3RSF1R0 / 719–7
French OpenA2R4R2R3R1R2R3R2R3R2R4R1RA0 / 1217–12
WimbledonAA1RAAA4RA2RA3R3R4RA0 / 611–6
US Open4R3RA4RAQFSFQF4RA2R1R2RA0 / 1026–10
Win–Loss3–13–23–24–22–14–212–49–38–45–24–37–49–40–10 / 3573–35
Year End Ranking94122926611582034284535701092

Records[edit]

ChampionshipYearsRecord accomplishedPlayer tied
ATP Tour1983–9510 match wins after trailing 0–2 in sets[14]Boris Becker

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d David J. Goldman. Jewish Sports Star: Athletic Heroes Past and Present. Retrieved March 20, 2011. 
  2. ^ "Mens Circuit – Player Biography". ITF Tennis. February 26, 1990. Retrieved March 20, 2011. 
  3. ^ a b Pressel continues her education. ESPN. February 19, 2006. Retrieved March 20, 2011. 
  4. ^ a b Peter S. Horvitz (2007). The Big Book of Jewish Sports Heroes; An Illustrated Compendium of Sports History and The 150 Greatest Jewish Sports Stars. SP Books. Retrieved March 20, 2011. 
  5. ^ a b c d Bob Wechsler. Day by day in Jewish sports history. Retrieved March 20, 2011. 
  6. ^ Cohen, Rich (February 21, 1999). "People of the Book". The New York Times. Retrieved August 18, 2013. 
  7. ^ Rosen, Harvey (May 10, 1989) Sporting Touch. The Jewish Post and News via Google news Page A20. Retrieved March 20, 2011
  8. ^ Rosen, Harvey (August 15, 1990) Sporting Touch. The Jewish Post and News via Google news Page 15. Retrieved March 20, 2011
  9. ^ a b c Michigan Serves Up Baby-Faced Aaron Krickstein, 17, the Youngest Top-10 Terror in Tennis. People. September 3, 1984. Retrieved March 20, 2011. 
  10. ^ Ezra Mendelsohn. Jews and the Sporting Life: Studies in Contemporary Jewry XXIII. Retrieved March 20, 2011. 
  11. ^ [1][dead link]
  12. ^ [2][dead link]
  13. ^ Robert Slater (2004). Great Jews in Sports. Jonathan David Publishers Inc. Retrieved March 20, 2011. 
  14. ^ a b Bricker, Charles (June 27, 1995). "2 Sets Down, Krickstein Wins Again". South Florida Sun-Sentinel. Retrieved June 7, 2012. 
  15. ^ "Krickstein, Aaron". Jews In Sports. Archived from the original on May 23, 2005. Retrieved January 11, 2014. 
  16. ^ "Player profile – Aaron Krickstein (USA)". Davis Cup. Retrieved March 20, 2011. 

External links[edit]