ASiT

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The Association of Surgeons in Training (ASiT) is an independent professional body and registered charity working to promote excellence in surgical training. It represents over 2,000 surgical trainees from all ten surgical specialities at both regional and national levels in the United Kingdom and Ireland.

Founded in 1976 as a forum for Senior Registrars to meet socially and discuss issues around training, ASiT has grown substantially and continues to fulfil those objectives. ASiT has a voice on the Councils of the Royal Surgical Colleges in the United Kingdom and the Specialist Advisory Committees, in addition to many other Department of Health and NHS groups. ASiT collects input from both training organizations and the trainees, and works to improve communications between these groups whilst promoting excellence in surgical training. The organisation publishes recommendations for developing and improving surgical training, including the role of simulation.[1][2][3]

ASiT is independent to the Surgical Royal Colleges, and is run by trainees, for trainees. The ASiT committee are elected annually at the Annual General Meeting, held at the surgical conference.

ASiT Annual Surgical Trainee Conference

ASiT organises a highly regarded annual three-day international conference for doctors in surgical training with a range of pre-conference educational courses. Hosting nearly 700 delegates from across the UK and abroad, it is an opportunity to discuss surgical training and present current research. Recent conferences have been held in:

Research prizes awarded include the ASiT Medal, and the SARS/ASIT Academic & Research Surgery Prize, in addition to numerous surgical specialty prizes. The ASiT Lecture is presented by a keynote speaker at the annual conference, and the Charity Gala Dinner party is the social focus for the weekend, raising money for medical charities.

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