A. J. Foyt

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Anthony Joseph Foyt, Jr.
AJFoyt cropped.jpg
Born(1935-01-16) January 16, 1935 (age 79)
Houston, Texas, U.S.
Awards

Only driver to win the Indianapolis 500 (four times), the Daytona 500, the 24 Hours of Daytona, and the 24 Hours of Le Mans.

International Motorsports Hall of Fame Inductee (2000)

Named co-Driver of the Century by the Associated Press

Named one of NASCAR's 50 Greatest Drivers (1998)

Inducted in the first class in the National Sprint Car Hall of Fame (U.S.) (1990)

Inducted in the first class into the Motorsports Hall of Fame of America (1989)

Inducted in the National Midget Auto Racing Hall of Fame (1988)
NASCAR Sprint Cup Series career
128 race(s) run over 30 year(s)
Best finish40th—1989 (Winston Cup)
First race1963 Motor Trend 500 (Riverside)
Last race1994 Brickyard 400 (Indianapolis)
First win1964 Firecracker 400 (Daytona)
Last win1972 Miller High Life 500 (Ontario)
WinsTop tensPoles
7369
 
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Anthony Joseph Foyt, Jr.
AJFoyt cropped.jpg
Born(1935-01-16) January 16, 1935 (age 79)
Houston, Texas, U.S.
Awards

Only driver to win the Indianapolis 500 (four times), the Daytona 500, the 24 Hours of Daytona, and the 24 Hours of Le Mans.

International Motorsports Hall of Fame Inductee (2000)

Named co-Driver of the Century by the Associated Press

Named one of NASCAR's 50 Greatest Drivers (1998)

Inducted in the first class in the National Sprint Car Hall of Fame (U.S.) (1990)

Inducted in the first class into the Motorsports Hall of Fame of America (1989)

Inducted in the National Midget Auto Racing Hall of Fame (1988)
NASCAR Sprint Cup Series career
128 race(s) run over 30 year(s)
Best finish40th—1989 (Winston Cup)
First race1963 Motor Trend 500 (Riverside)
Last race1994 Brickyard 400 (Indianapolis)
First win1964 Firecracker 400 (Daytona)
Last win1972 Miller High Life 500 (Ontario)
WinsTop tensPoles
7369
A. J. Foyt
Related toA. J. Foyt IV (grandson)
Larry Foyt (adopted son)
USAC & CART Championship Car series
Years active1957–1993
TeamsDean Van Lines Special
Anstead-Thompson Racing
Gilmore Racing
A. J. Foyt Enterprises
Starts369
Wins67
Poles53
Best finish1st in 1960, 1961, 1963, 1964, 1967, 1975, & 1979 (USAC)
Championship titles
1960
1960
1961
1963
1964
1967
1968
1972
1975
1975-76
1976-77
1978
1979
1979
USAC Sprint Car Series Champion
USAC National Champion
USAC National Champion
USAC National Champion
USAC National Champion
USAC National Champion
USAC Stock Car Champion
USAC Silver Crown Series Champion
USAC National Champion
IROC Champion
IROC Champion
USAC Stock Car Champion
USAC Gold Crown Champion
USAC Stock Car Champion
Formula One World Championship career
NationalityUnited States American
Active years19581960
TeamsKuzma, Kurtis Kraft
Races3
Championships0
Wins0
Podiums0
Career points0
Pole positions0
Fastest laps0
First race1958 Indianapolis 500
Last race1960 Indianapolis 500

Anthony Joseph "A. J." Foyt, Jr. (born January 16, 1935) is a retired American automobile racing driver. He raced in numerous genres of motorsports. His open wheel racing includes USAC Champ cars and midget cars. He raced stock cars in NASCAR and USAC. He won several major sports car racing events. He holds the all-time USAC career wins record with 159 victories,[1] and the all-time American championship racing career wins record with 67.[2]

He is the only driver to win the Indianapolis 500 (which he won four times), the Daytona 500, the 24 Hours of Daytona, and the 24 Hours of Le Mans. Foyt won the International Race of Champions all-star racing series in 1976 and 1977. In the NASCAR stock car circuit, he won the 1964 Firecracker 400 and the 1972 Daytona 500. Foyt survived three spectacular crashes that caused serious injuries, and narrowly escaped a fourth with skillful driving. Foyt's success has led to induction in numerous motorsports halls of fame.

Since his retirement from active racing, he has owned A. J. Foyt Enterprises, which has fielded teams in the CART, IRL, and NASCAR.

Early life[edit]

Foyt was born in Houston, Texas. He attended Pershing and Hamilton middle schools and Lamar and San Jacinto high schools,[3] but he dropped out to become a mechanic.[4]

Driving career[edit]

Midget car career[edit]

Foyt began racing midgets in 1953 at age 18 in a car owned and maintained by his father. He started his USAC career in a midget car at the 1956 Night before the 500 in Anderson, Indiana. His first midget car win was at a 100 lap event at Kansas City in 1957, and finished seventh in the season points standings.[1] He left midget cars after the 1957 season to drive in sprint cars and Championship Car. He did occasionally compete in midget car events. He won the 1960 and 1961 Turkey Night Grand Prix, the first two years that it was held at Ascot Park. He won the 1961 Hut Hundred after starting last, and finished seventh in National Midget points that year. He won the 1970 Astro Grand Prix, an event that he promoted in his hometown of Houston. He ended his career with 20 midget car feature wins. Even after he had reached the pinnacle of his sport, Foyt was known to make occasional appearances in small, local events as a way of thanking promoters who had supported him in his struggle up the ladder.

Sprint car career[edit]

A.J. began his sprint car career in 1956, at age 21, driving the Les Vaughn Offy with the International Motor Contest Association. On August 24, 1956, Foyt out qualified a field of 42 drivers at the Minnesota State Fair and, the following day, he won his first sprint car race, running away with the IMCA feature at the Red River Fair in Fargo, N.D. On June 16, 1957, on the high banked asphalt track at Salem, Indiana, A.J. came out on top in a race long battle with Bob Cleberg. That victory put Foyt on the radar for USAC car owners and he switched from the IMCA to USAC later that season. A.J. eventually won 28 USAC National sprint car feature races and the USAC Eastern Championship in 1960. Foyt continued to race sprint cars long after he was firmly established as one of the top drivers at the Indy 500.

Championship car career[edit]

The car Foyt drove to Indy victory in 1977
Foyt racing at Pocono in 1984

In 1961, he became the first driver to successfully defend his points championship and win the Indianapolis 500 race. Late in the 500, Foyt made a pit stop for fuel, but a refueling malfunction meant that he returned to the race without enough fuel to finish. Eddie Sachs, unaware that Foyt's now-quicker car was light on fuel, pushed hard to keep up—and Sachs had to pit from the lead with just three laps remaining to replace a shredded right rear tire. Foyt pitted again also but only for enough fuel to finish. He took over the lead and beat Sachs by just 8.28 seconds—the second-closest finish in history at the time. He raced in each season from 1957–1992, starting in 374 races and finishing in the top ten 201 times, with 67 victories. In 1958, Foyt raced in Italy in the Trophy of the Two Worlds on the banking at Monza.

Ford-powered entries were widely expected to dominate the 1964 Indianapolis 500. Discussions between Ford officials and Foyt (who had a stock car contract with Ford at the time) took place early in the month of May about the possibility of Foyt taking over the third Team Lotus-Ford, a team reserve vehicle. Foyt wanted the use of the car for the entire month, but Lotus team owner Colin Chapman was reluctant to promise him the reserve car, in case something happened to cars driven by team drivers Jim Clark and Dan Gurney.

So discussions ended and Foyt stayed with his reliable, well-sorted Offenhauser-engined roadster. In the 1964 season, Foyt won a record 10 of 14 races en route to his championship, including the Indy 500. When the two fastest Lotus-Fords, driven by Jim Clark and Bobby Marshman, fell out of the race with mechanical problems, and Parnelli Jones was knocked out when his fuel tank exploded during a pit stop, Foyt was left alone at the front of the field, and cruised home to win his second Indianapolis 500. The race is remembered for the fiery second-lap crash that claimed the lives of Dave MacDonald and Eddie Sachs. Foyt did not learn of the fate of his two friends until he reached victory lane, and was handed a newspaper with a headline announcing the tragedy.

In August 1966, at the Milwaukee 200-mile (320 km) Championship Car race, Foyt's rear-engined Lotus pavement car was not at the track. So Foyt unloaded the Offenhauser-engined dirt track car he had won the 100-mile (160 km) race with at Springfield the previous day. He sprayed the mud off the car, installed pavement tires and a set-up for the one mile (1.6 km) oval. Foyt received permission to take two extra warm up laps during qualifying, as he had no time for practice. He then qualified the car on the pole, led the race for 18 out of 200 laps but then had to stop for a new rear tire, and finished second to Gordon Johncock, driving a rear-engined Gerhardt-Offy Indy car.

In the 1967 Indianapolis 500, Parnelli Jones' STP-Paxton Turbocar was expected to easily defeat the field of piston engines. Jones lapped the field, but his car expired with three laps remaining, and Foyt inherited the lead. As he drove down the back straightaway on the last lap, Foyt suddenly remembered an odd premonition that had struck him the night before, when he wondered aloud what would happen in the event of a big last-lap accident. As Foyt moved through Turn 3 on the 200th lap, he slowed down. A few hundred yards ahead of him, Carl Williams spun out as he exited Turn 4, triggering a five-car front-stretch accident right in front of Foyt. Traveling at no more than 100 mph, Foyt threaded his way through the wreckage and safely took the checkered flag. The race took two days to complete when rain stopped the race on the 18th lap on the first day.

In the 1977 Indianapolis 500, Foyt ran out of fuel, and had to make a pit stop. He had to make up around 32 seconds on Gordon Johncock. Foyt made up 1.5 to 2 seconds per lap by turning up his turbo boost, which risks destroying the engine. Johncock's own engine expired just as Foyt had closed to within eight seconds back after both drivers' final pit stops, and Foyt passed for the win.

In 1981, Foyt was involved in an accident at the Michigan 500 and nearly lost an arm. It took him a while to get back to full fitness; and at the Indy 500 the following year he qualified third.

Foyt won the Indianapolis 500 4 times, in 1961, 1964, 1967 and 1977. He was the first driver to do so. The feat has since been matched by Al Unser (1970, 1971, 1978, 1987) and Rick Mears (1979, 1984, 1988, 1991). Of his 67 career Championship Car race victories, twelve were won at Trenton (NJ) Speedway. Foyt also won the Indycar Series seven times, a record that still stands.

In a 1990 CART race at Road America in Elkhart Lake, Wisconsin, Foyt was involved in a serious crash that injured his legs and feet severely. He would return the following year for the 1991 Indianapolis 500 to qualify second.

Sports car racing[edit]

Foyt is famous for winning the prestigious 24 Hours of Le Mans race in his first and only attempt, in 1967; Foyt drove a Ford GT40 Mk IV, partnered with Dan Gurney and entered by Carroll Shelby's team. Prior to the race, he had angered the French fans and press by remarking that the notoriously fast and dangerous tree-lined course was "nothin' but a little old country road."[5] Also, he reportedly only got 10 laps of pre-race practice. But when Gurney overslept and missed a driver change in the middle of the night, Foyt was forced to double-stint and wound up driving nearly 18 hours of the 24-hour race. While being sprayed with champagne on the victory podium, he is reported to have asked, "Do I win Rookie Of The Year?" Foyt would also later win the 12 Hours of Sebring and 24 Hours of Daytona during the 1980s driving Porsches, making him one of only 12 drivers to complete the Triple Crown of endurance racing.

Foyt in a midget car in 1961

Stock car career[edit]

USAC Stock Car[edit]

He was the champion in USAC's stock car in 1968, 1978, and 1979. He finished second in 1963 and 1969, and third in 1970.[6] Among his wins in USAC stock car racing was his 1964 win at the Billy Vukovich Memorial 200 at Hanford Speedway in California. He also was a miltiple winner in USAC stockers at Milwaukee, Texas World Speedway, and Michigan International Speedway.

NASCAR[edit]

Foyt, a veteran who had been racing professionally for eight seasons before trying his hand at NASCAR racing, only needed ten races to get his first victory. Richard Petty dominated the 1964 Firecracker 400 until he dropped out with engine problems. Foyt swapped the lead with Bobby Isaac for the final 50 laps of the summer event at the Daytona International Speedway. Foyt passed Isaac on the final lap to win the race.

In January 1965, Foyt qualified and ran in the front of the pack most of the day with Dan Gurney and Parnelli Jones in the Motor Trend 500 at Riverside. Parnelli retired with mechanical issues, leaving Gurney and Foyt to contest the lead. Late in the race, dueling with Gurney, Foyt spun. His car refired, and he charged through the field in an attempt to regain lost positions. After running hard to catch leader Gurney, Foyt's brakes failed entering Turn 9 at the end of Riverside's mile-long, downhill back straight. Foyt turned the car into the infield at more than 100 mph, and the car tumbled violently end-over-end several times. The track doctor at Riverside International Raceway pronounced Foyt dead at the scene of the severe crash, but fellow driver Parnelli Jones revived him after seeing movement. Foyt suffered severe chest injuries, a broken back, and a fractured ankle. Footage of his flipping #00 Ford, owned by Holman Moody, is featured in the final scene of the movie Redline 7000.

Foyt ran out of gas near the end of the 1971 Daytona 500, and Petty passed him for the win. Foyt again had the car to beat in the 1972 Daytona 500, but this time succeeded in a dominating performance. Only three drivers led during the race. In 1979 at the Daytona 500, Foyt was running in 5th place, but when Cale Yarborough and Donnie Allison had their famous tangle on the final lap, Foyt finished in 3rd spot behind Darrell Waltrip and Richard Petty who again won the race. When Foyt pulled up next to Petty after the checkers to congratulate him, he was called "a true gentleman" during the broadcasting.

Foyt won the 1971 and 1972 races at the Ontario Motor Speedway for Wood Brothers Racing. The track was shaped like the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. The 1972 race was his last NASCAR points win; his final win in a NASCAR race was in the first of Daytona's 125-mile qualifying heats in 1978, driving a self-fielded superspeedway Buick.

Career summary[edit]

Awards[edit]

Indianapolis 500 records[edit]

Foyt has numerous career records at the Indianapolis 500: the first of to date three drivers to win a record four times, the most consecutive and career starts (35), most races led (13), most times led during the career (39), and most competitive laps and miles during a career (4,909 laps, 12,272.5 miles). In the 1961 Indianapolis 500 Foyt won over Eddie Sachs with a lead of 8.28 seconds, the second closest finish in Indianapolis history at the time.

As of November 2011, Foyt stands as only the third-oldest living winner of the Indianapolis 500 (Parnelli Jones and Bobby Unser are older), but the longest-ago living winner (1961).

Car owner[edit]

A. J. Foyt (right) and former driver Darren Manning (left) at the 2007 Indianapolis 500.

While an active driver, Foyt entered into a longtime partnership with Kalamazoo, Michigan businessman Jim Gilmore, and raced under the Gilmore-Foyt Racing name for many years.

After retiring as a driver, he continued his involvement in racing as a car owner of A. J. Foyt Enterprises in the CART series, then the Indy Racing League (IRL) and NASCAR.

Scott Sharp took a share of the 1996 Indy Racing League (IRL) title driving for Foyt while Kenny Bräck won the 1998 IRL title, also in a Foyt car. Bräck won the 1999 Indianapolis 500 in Foyt's car, putting Foyt in the winner's circle at Indy for the fifth time. The current driver for his IRL team, A. J. Foyt Enterprises, is Takuma Sato. On June 7, 1997, Foyt (as an owner) was involved in an incident that helped shape the history of the Indy Racing League and added to his reputation as a man of little patience. One of his drivers, Billy Boat, had been declared the winner of the inaugural IRL race at Texas Motor Speedway that had been held that night, and his other driver, Davey Hamilton, had come in second. However, Dutch driver Arie Luyendyk disputed Boat's win, claiming that he was in the lead when a scoring error by USAC (who had scored all IRL races up until that time) gave Boat the checkered flag. When Luyendyk entered victory lane after the race to confront TMS general manager Eddie Gossage about the finish uttering obscenities, an irate Foyt approached Luyendyk from behind and slapped and shoved him into a tulip bed (ironically given Luyendyk's Dutch nationality). Luyendyk then requested a review of the race; a few days later, USAC reversed its position and declared Luyendyk the winner; Foyt kept the victory lane-awarded trophy. Following the controversy, the IRL relieved USAC of the scoring duties for its events.

Family[edit]

Foyt is the grandfather of A. J. Foyt IV. Foyt is the grandfather and adoptive father of Larry Foyt. He is also the godfather of driver John Andretti. When not busy with the racing season, A.J. Foyt likes to spend time at the family Ranches, The Foyt Ranch located in Hockley, Texas and Brackettville, Texas.

The Foyts are also, via marriage, part of the ownership group of the Indianapolis Colts. A. J. Foyt IV is married to the daughter of Colts owner Jim Irsay.

Racing record[edit]

Complete Formula One World Championship results[edit]

(key)

YearEntrantChassisEngine1234567891011WDCPoints
1958Dean Van LinesKuzmaOffenhauserARG
MON
NED
500
Ret
BEL
FRA
GBR
GER
POR
ITA
MOR
NC0
1959Dean Van LinesKuzmaOffenhauserMON
500
10
NED
FRA
GBR
GER
POR
ITA
USA
NC0
1960Bowes Seal FastKurtis KraftOffenhauserARG
MON
500
Ret
NED
BEL
FRA
GBR
POR
ITA
USA
NC0

USAC results[edit]

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position)

YearTeam123456789101112131415161718RankPoints
1973Gilmore RacingTWS
11
TRE
1
TRE
11
INDY
25
MIL
Wth
POC
1
MCH
13
MIL
25
ONT
ONT
ONT
10
MCH
13
MCH
14
TRE
20
TWS
10
PHX
DNS
10th1580
1974Gilmore RacingONT
1
ONTONT
30
PHX
3
TRE
DNS
INDY
15
MIL
6
POC
27
MCH
13
MIL
2
MCH
24
TRE
1
TRE
4
PHX
4
8th1510
1975Gilmore RacingONT
1
ONTONT
1
PHX
3
TRE
1
INDY
3
MIL
1
POC
1
MCH
1
MIL
20
MCH
7
TRE
2
PHX
1
1st4920
1976Gilmore RacingPHX
21
TRE
18
INDY
2
MIL
17
POC
31
MCH
3
TWS
1
TRE
19
MILONT
23
MCH
1
TWS
11
PHX
Wth
7th1720
1977Gilmore RacingONT
1
PHX
2
TWS
14
TREINDY
1
MIL
Wth
POC
15
MOS
1
MCH
DNS
TWS
19
MILONT
2
MCHPHX4th2840
1978Gilmore RacingPHX
3
ONT
4
TWS
17
TRE
2
INDY
7
MOS
16
MIL
19
POC
8
MCH
16
ATL
4
TWS
1
MIL
4
ONT
28
MCH
5
TRE
19
SIL
1
BRH
4
PHX
2
5th3024
1979Gilmore RacingONT
1
TWS
1
INDY
2
MIL
1
POC
1
TWS
1
MIL
12
1st3320
1980Gilmore RacingONT
Wth
INDY
14
MIL
POC
19
MDO
35th45
1981-82Gilmore RacingINDY
13
POC
1
ILLDUQISFINDY
19
4th1045

CART[edit]

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position)

YearTeam1234567891011121314151617RankPoints
1979Gilmore RacingPHX
ATL
ATL
INDY
2
TRE
TRE
MCH
MCH
WGL
TRE
ONT
MCH
ATL
PHX
NC-
1980Gilmore RacingONT
Wth
INDY
14
MIL
POC
19
MDO
MCH
WGL
MIL
ONT
MCH
MEX
PHX
44th45
1981Gilmore RacingPHX
MIL
ATL
ATL
MCH
26
RIV
MIL
MCH
WGL
MEX
PHX
NC0
1982Gilmore RacingPHX
ATL
MIL
2
CLE
22
MCH
20
MIL
POC
20
RIV
ROA
MCH
23
PHX
28th22
1983Gilmore RacingATL
INDY
31
MIL
CLE
MCH
ROA
POC
RIV
MDO
MCH
CPL
LAG
PHX
NC0
1984Gilmore RacingLBHPHXINDY
6
MILPORMEA
DNS
CLEMCH
22
ROAPOC
27
MDOSANMCH
Wth
PHX
14
LAGLVS
22
21st22
1985A. J. Foyt EnterprisesLBH
INDY
28
MIL
POR
MEA
23
CLE
MCH
DNS
ROAPOC
24
MDOSAN
24
MCH
LAGPHX
23
MIA
20
49th0
1986A. J. Foyt EnterprisesPHX
17
LBHINDY
24
MIL
19
PORMEACLETORMCH
9
POC
4
MDOSANMCH
16
ROALAGPHX
22
MIA
23
21st16
1987A. J. Foyt EnterprisesLBHPHXINDY
19
MIL
6
PORMEACLETORMCH
26
POC
7
ROA
MDO
NAZ
7
LAG
MIA
25
23rd14
1988A. J. Foyt EnterprisesPHX
4
LBH
11
INDY
26
MIL
5
POR
15
CLE
11
TOR
15
MEA
17
MCH
Wth
POC
16
MDO
22
ROA
10
NAZ
17
LAG
24
MIA
25
16th29
1989A. J. Foyt EnterprisesPHX
22
LBH
25
INDY
5
MIL
20
DET
26
POR
Wth
CLEMEA
23
TOR
17
MCH
18
POC
21
MDO
21
ROA
22
NAZ
14
LAG18th10
1990A. J. Foyt EnterprisesPHX
22
LBH
24
INDY
6
MIL
9
DET
17
POR
10
CLE
7
MEA
5
TOR
16
MCH
6
DEN
10
VAN
13
MDO
15
ROA
20
NAZLAG11th42
1991Copenhagen RacingSRFLBHPHXINDY
28
MIL
16
DET
23
POR
16
CLE
20
MEA
13
TORMCH
17
DENVANMDOROANAZ
16
LAG32nd0
1992Walker MotorsportSRF
23
26th4
Copenhagen RacingPHX
DNQ
LBHINDY
9
DETPORMILNHATORMCHCLEROAVANMDONAZLAG
1993Copenhagen RacingSRF
PHX
LBH
INDY
DNQ
MIL
DET
POR
CLE
TOR
MCH
NHA
ROA
VAN
MDO
NAZ
LAG
NC-

Indy 500 results[edit]

YearChassisEngineStartFinish
1958Kuzma/BrawnerOffy12th16th
1959KuzmaOffy17th10th
1960Kurtis/EpperlyOffy16th25th
1961TrevisOffy7th1st
1962TrevisOffy5th23rd
1963TrevisOffy8th3rd
1964WatsonOffy5th1st
1965Lotus 34Ford1st15th
1966Lotus 38Ford18th26th
1967Coyote 67Ford4th1st
1968Coyote 68Ford8th20th
1969Coyote/KuzmaFord1st8th
1970Coyote 70Ford3rd10th
1971Coyote 71Ford6th3rd
1972Coyote 72Foyt17th25th
1973Coyote 73Foyt23rd25th
1974Coyote 73Foyt1st15th
1975Coyote 75Foyt1st3rd
1976Coyote 75Foyt5th2nd
1977Coyote 75Foyt4th1st
1978Coyote 75Foyt20th7th
1979Parnelli VPJ6CFord Cosworth DFX6th2nd
1980Parnelli VPJ6CFord Cosworth DFX12th14th
1981Coyote 81Ford Cosworth DFX3rd13th
1982March 82CFord Cosworth DFX3rd19th
1983March 83CFord Cosworth DFX24th31st
1984March 84CFord Cosworth DFX12th6th
1985March 85CFord Cosworth DFX21st28th
1986March 86CFord Cosworth DFX21st24th
1987Lola T87/00Ford Cosworth DFX4th19th
1988Lola T87/00Ford Cosworth DFX22nd26th
1989Lola T89/00Ford Cosworth DFX10th5th
1990Lola T90/00Chevrolet 265A8th6th
1991Lola T91/00Chevrolet 265A2nd28th
1992Lola T92/00Chevrolet 265A23rd9th
1993Lola T93/00Ford XBRetired

Indy 500 qualifying results[edit]

YearAtt #DateTimeQual
Day
Car #LapsQual
Time
Qual
Speed
RankStartComment
19672205-13221142PULLED OFF
19672805-13281144166.28944 
1968805-188114166.82188 
1969405-2442643:31.0600170.56811 
1970505-165174170.00433 
1971205-1521943:26.5200174.31766 
1972305-1317:57120BLOWN ENGINE
19723005-2011:302243:10.4800188.996516 
19732505-1214:271143WAVED OFF
19732705-1215:2011443:10.5500188.9273223 
1974805-1111:0511443:07.8600191.63211 
1975405-1011:381141PULLED OFF
19751905-1016:1011443:05.5900193.97611 
19761205-1516:5511443:14.3200185.261105 
1977105-1411:0211443:06.0800193.465ATTEMPT WITHDRAWN BY USAC
19771205-1412:3911443:05.0300194.56354 
19781405-2012:471140PULLED OFF
19783905-2113:2431442:59.8900200.122321 
19793305-1316:3211443:09.8600189.61366 
19802405-1014:241140 
19803205-1016:141141FLAGGED OFF; RAIN
19803305-1017:5911443:14.0700185.5001612 
1981205-0915:4911443:03.6000196.07863 
19822505-1516:2311442:57.0500203.33233 
19833005-2114:5921443:00.4000199.5571424 
19842505-1215:231141PULLED OFF
19843905-1217:391442:56.5920203.8601212 
19851005-1111:5511442:54.9420205.7822721 
19863605-1112:0921442:48.8460213.212522 
19872105-0917:0711442:50.6690210.93544 
1988405-141140PULLED OFF
19883105-1417:231143PULLED OFF
19884705-2114:3534142:51.6770209.6961522 
19891505-1413:2411442:45.7950217.1361210 
19902405-1911:3211442:43.3210220.42588 
1991105-1111:0011442:41.8390222.44362 
19922305-0917:571143PULLED OFF
19922805-1012:2021442:41.5810222.7981623 

Daytona 500 results[edit]

YearManufacturerStartFinishTeam
1963Pontiac727Nichels
1964Ford824Matthews
1966Ford2233Johnson
1967Ford537Matthews
1968Ford1912Matthews
1969Ford94Bowsher
1970Ford2832Jack Bowsher
1971Mercury13Wood
1972Mercury21Wood
1973Chevrolet84Foyt
1974Chevrolet355Foyt
1975Chevrolet911Ellington
1976Chevrolet3122Ellington
1977Chevrolet26Foyt
1978Buick332Foyt
1979Oldsmobile63Foyt
1980Oldsmobile1131Foyt
1981Oldsmobile1035Foyt
1982Oldsmobile921Foyt
1983Chevrolet911Foyt
1984Oldsmobile3239Foyt
1985Oldsmobile1630Foyt
1986Oldsmobile2029Foyt
1987Oldsmobile4142Foyt
1988Oldsmobile1733Foyt
1989Oldsmobile2438Foyt
1990Oldsmobile1336Foyt
1992Oldsmobile3921D. Bierschwale

See also[edit]

References[edit]

The Greatest 33 Profile

External links[edit]

Sporting positions
Preceded by
Bobby Unser
IROC Champion
IROC III (1976), IROC IV (1977)
Succeeded by
Al Unser
Preceded by
Don White
USAC Stock Car Champion
1968
Succeeded by
Roger McCluskey
Preceded by
Paul Feldner
USAC Stock Car Champion
1978, 1979
Succeeded by
Joe Ruttman
Achievements
Preceded by
Bruce McLaren
Chris Amon
Winner of the 24 Hours of Le Mans
1967 with:
Dan Gurney
Succeeded by
Pedro Rodriguez
Lucien Bianchi
Preceded by
Jim Rathmann
Indianapolis 500 Winner
1961
Succeeded by
Rodger Ward
Preceded by
Parnelli Jones
Indianapolis 500 Winner
1964
Succeeded by
Jim Clark
Preceded by
Graham Hill
Indianapolis 500 Winner
1967
Succeeded by
Bobby Unser
Preceded by
Johnny Rutherford
Indianapolis 500 Winner
1977
Succeeded by
Al Unser
Preceded by
Richard Petty
Daytona 500 Winner
1972
Succeeded by
Richard Petty