77th Academy Awards

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77th Academy Awards
Oscars2004.JPG
DateSunday, February 27, 2005
SiteKodak Theatre
Hollywood, Los Angeles, California
HostChris Rock
Pre-showBilly Bush
Jann Carl
Chris Connelly
Shaun Robinson
ProducerGilbert Cates
DirectorLouis J. Horvitz
Highlights
Best PictureMillion Dollar Baby
Most awardsThe Aviator (5)
Most nominationsThe Aviator (11)
TV in the United States
NetworkABC
Duration3 hours, 14 minutes
Ratings42.16 million
25.29 (Nielsen Ratings)
 < 76thAcademy Awards78th > 
 
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77th Academy Awards
Oscars2004.JPG
DateSunday, February 27, 2005
SiteKodak Theatre
Hollywood, Los Angeles, California
HostChris Rock
Pre-showBilly Bush
Jann Carl
Chris Connelly
Shaun Robinson
ProducerGilbert Cates
DirectorLouis J. Horvitz
Highlights
Best PictureMillion Dollar Baby
Most awardsThe Aviator (5)
Most nominationsThe Aviator (11)
TV in the United States
NetworkABC
Duration3 hours, 14 minutes
Ratings42.16 million
25.29 (Nielsen Ratings)
 < 76thAcademy Awards78th > 

The 77th Academy Awards honored the best films of 2004 and were held on February 27, 2005, at the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood, California. They were hosted by comedian Chris Rock.

The nominees were announced on January 25, 2005. Martin Scorsese's biopic of the eccentric Howard Hughes, The Aviator, led the pack with eleven nominations including Best Actor, Best Director, and Best Picture. Marc Forster's Finding Neverland and Clint Eastwood's Million Dollar Baby each had seven nominations. Ray and Sideways rounded out the nominees for Best Picture.

The 77th Academy Awards was the first Oscar telecast since the 73rd Academy Awards to receive a TV rating of TV-14. This is most likely due to many "edgy" comments made by Chris Rock during the ceremony. Since this, every future telecast to date would receive a TV-14 rating.

Hilary Swank won her second Academy Award for Best Actress; among her fellow nominees was Annette Bening, who had also been nominated when Swank won her first award in 1999.

At age 74 Clint Eastwood became the oldest director to win the Oscar. This was also the second straight year that he directed two Academy Award-winning performances.

With The Aviator winning 5 Oscars, this was the last Oscar ceremony until the 2013 ceremony at which another film won more Oscars than the Best Picture winner. The last time this had happened was either in 1981 (Raiders of the Lost Ark) or in 1977 (Star Wars), depending on whether one counts the Special Achievement Award that Raiders received for its sound effects editing as a true win. In addition, Cate Blanchett won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her role as Katharine Hepburn in The Aviator, marking the only time in Academy Awards history that an actor won an Oscar for portraying an Oscar-winning actor.


Contents

Awards

Clint Eastwood, Best Director winner
Hilary Swank, Best Actress winner
Jamie Foxx, Best Actor winner
Cate Blanchett, Best Supporting Actress winner
Morgan Freeman, Best Supporting Actor winner

Winners are listed first and highlighted in boldface.[1]

Best PictureBest Director
Best ActorBest Actress
Best Supporting ActorBest Supporting Actress
Best Original ScreenplayBest Adapted Screenplay
Best Animated FeatureBest Foreign Language Film
Best Documentary FeatureBest Documentary Short
Best Live Action ShortBest Animated Short
Best Original ScoreBest Original Song
Best Sound EditingBest Sound Mixing
Best Art DirectionBest Cinematography
Best MakeupBest Costume Design
Best Film EditingBest Visual Effects

Multiple nominations and awards

The following 22 films received multiple nominations:

The following four films received multiple awards:

Academy Award ceremony presenters and performers

In Memoriam

A special tribute to past host Johnny Carson was presented by host Chris Rock with previous emcee Whoopi Goldberg discussing Carson's legacy to television and the Academy Awards in the segment.

Presented by Annette Bening with a musical solo by Yo-Yo Ma, the Academy recognizes those motion picture contributors that passed away in the previous year. In the order that they appear, the following actors and artists were featured: former president Ronald Reagan, Peter Ustinov, Carrie Snodgress, director Dan Petrie Sr., composer David Raksin, Fay Wray, film agent Phil Gersh, composer Elmer Bernstein, writer Carole Eastman, animator Frank Thomas, director Russ Meyer, Jerry Orbach, film editor Ralph E. Winters, writer Robert E. Thompson, Howard Keel, Janet Leigh, Christopher Reeve, Ossie Davis, producer Jerry Bick, Mercedes McCambridge, producer/writer William Sackheim, cinematographer Ed Di Gullio, writer Nelson Gidding, Paul Winfield, director Philippe de Broca, composer Jerry Goldsmith, Rodney Dangerfield, Virginia Mayo, Tony Randall and Marlon Brando.

News and recap

See also

References

External links