42 (number)

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414243
Cardinalforty-two
Ordinal42nd
(forty-second)
Factorization2 · 3 · 7
Divisors1, 2, 3, 6, 7, 14, 21, 42
Roman numeralXLII
Unicode symbol(s)
Greek prefixμβ
Binary1010102
Ternary11203
Quaternary2224
Quinary1325
Senary1106
Octal528
Duodecimal3612
Hexadecimal2A16
Vigesimal2220
Base 361636
 
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414243
Cardinalforty-two
Ordinal42nd
(forty-second)
Factorization2 · 3 · 7
Divisors1, 2, 3, 6, 7, 14, 21, 42
Roman numeralXLII
Unicode symbol(s)
Greek prefixμβ
Binary1010102
Ternary11203
Quaternary2224
Quinary1325
Senary1106
Octal528
Duodecimal3612
Hexadecimal2A16
Vigesimal2220
Base 361636

42 (forty-two) is the natural number immediately following 41 and directly preceding 43. The number has received considerable attention in popular culture as a result of its central appearance in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy as the "Answer to The Ultimate Question of Life, the Universe, and Everything".

Mathematics[edit]

The 3 × 3 × 3 magic cube with rows summing to 42.

Science[edit]

Technology[edit]

Astronomy[edit]

Religion[edit]

Popular culture[edit]

The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy[edit]

The number 42 is, in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams, "The Answer to the Ultimate Question of Life, the Universe, and Everything", calculated by an enormous supercomputer over a period of 7.5 million years. Unfortunately no one knows what the question is. Thus, to calculate the Ultimate Question, a special computer the size of a small planet and built from organic components was created and named "Earth". This appeared first in the radio play and later in the novelization of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy. The fact that Adams named the episodes of the radio play "fits", the same archaic title for a chapter or section used by Lewis Carroll in "The Hunting of the Snark", suggests that Adams was influenced by Carroll's fascination with and frequent use of the number. The fourth book in the series, the novel So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish, contains 42 chapters. According to the novel Mostly Harmless, 42 is the street address of Stavromula Beta. In 1994 Adams created the 42 Puzzle, a game based on the number 42.

The book 42: Douglas Adams' Amazingly Accurate Answer to Life, the Universe and Everything[15] examines Adams' choice of the number 42 and also contains a compendium of some instances of the number in science, popular culture, and humour.

Works of Lewis Carroll[edit]

Lewis Carroll[16] made repeated use of this number in his writings.[17]

Examples of Carroll's use of 42:

Music[edit]

Television and film[edit]

Video games[edit]

Sports[edit]

Jackie Robinson in his now-retired number 42 jersey.

Other fields[edit]

Other languages[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ J. B. Conrey & A. Ghosh, "A conjecture for the sixth power moment of the Riemann zeta-function" International Mathematics Research Notices (1998)
  2. ^ J. B. Conrey & S. M. Gonek, "High moments of the Riemann zeta-function" Duke Math J. 107 3 (2001): 577–604
  3. ^ Differently Perfect – mathpages.com
  4. ^ Sequence A019283 in OEIS
  5. ^ Alex Zhai ties for second-highest score in 2007 USA Mathematical Olympiad – By Andrew Lovdahl Gargoyle staff reporter Posted Monday, May 7, 2007, The OG, news & student awards – Online Gargoyle
  6. ^ CBC News staff, "Canadian math champ's skills add up to a perfect score" CBC News July 20, 2004. "A 16-year-old Canadian was one of four students who achieved a perfect score at an international mathematics competition. Jacob Tsimerman of Toronto scored 42 out of 42, making him one of 45 individual gold medallists at the 45th International Mathematical Olympiad in Athens."
  7. ^ Cooper, Paul W. (1966). "Through the Earth in Forty Minutes". American Journal of Physics 34 (1): 68–69. doi:10.1119/1.1972773. 
  8. ^ "To Everywhere in 42 Minutes". Time. February 11, 1966. Archived from the original on 12 May 2008. Retrieved 2008-05-18. 
  9. ^ "Jumping into a 7,965 mile deep hole". Archived from the original on June 2, 2008. Retrieved 2008-05-18. 
  10. ^ Carroll, Lewis (29 December 1893). "Chapter 7". Sylvie and Bruno Concluded 2. illustrated by Harry Furniss. United Kingdom: Macmillan and Co. "Each railway is in a long tunnel, perfectly straight: so of course the middle of it is nearer the centre of the globe than the two ends: so every train runs half-way down-hill, and that gives it force enough to run the other half up-hill." 
  11. ^ Lee Middleton; Jayanthi Sivaswamy (2002). "Framework for practical hexagonal-image processing". Journal of Electronic Imaging 11 (104). doi:10.1117/1.1426078. Retrieved January 17, 2010 (abstract only). 
  12. ^ "Maximum password age". Microsoft TechNet. Retrieved 15 January 2014. 
  13. ^ Niiya, Brian. Japanese American history: an A-to-Z reference from 1868 to the present. Facts on File, Inc., 1993, p. 352
  14. ^ Joel Primack; Nancy E. Abrams. "In A Beginning...Quantum Cosmology and Kabbalah" (PDF). Retrieved 2008-03-14. 
  15. ^ Gill, Peter (February 3, 2011). "42: Douglas Adams' Amazingly Accurate Answer to Life the Universe and Everything". London: Guardian. Retrieved 3 April 2011. 
  16. ^ Lewis Carroll and Douglas Adams
  17. ^ The Mystery of Lewis Carroll, Jenny Woolf
  18. ^ The Hunting of the Snark, by Lewis Carroll
  19. ^ The Hunting of the Snark, by Lewis Carroll
  20. ^ What Lewis Carroll Taught Us: Alice's creator knew all about role-playing. by Seth Lerer, March 4, 2010
  21. ^ 42: Forty Two Up at IMDb
  22. ^ http://www.slate.com/id/2284721/ Ken Jennings

External links[edit]