2020 Summer Olympics

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Games of the XXXII Olympiad
Tokyo 2020 Olympic bid logo.svg
Tokyo Candidate City Logo
Host cityTokyo, Japan
Motto'Discover Tomorrow'
Opening ceremony24 July
Closing ceremony9 August
 
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Games of the XXXII Olympiad
Tokyo 2020 Olympic bid logo.svg
Tokyo Candidate City Logo
Host cityTokyo, Japan
Motto'Discover Tomorrow'
Opening ceremony24 July
Closing ceremony9 August

The 2020 Summer Olympics (Japanese: 2020年夏季オリンピック Hepburn: Nisen-nijū-nen Kaki Orinpikku?), officially known as the Games of the XXXII Olympiad (第三十二回オリンピック競技大会 Dai Sanjūni-kai Orinpikku Kyōgi Taikai?) and colloquially as the Tokyo Olympics (東京オリンピック Tōkyō Orinpikku?, also written 東京五輪), are a major international multi-sport event due to be celebrated in the tradition of the Olympic Games as governed by the International Olympic Committee (IOC). The games are planned to be held from 24 July – 9 August 2020 in Tokyo, Japan. Tokyo was announced as the host city at the 125th IOC Session in Buenos Aires, Argentina, on 7 September 2013.[1] Tokyo previously hosted the 1964 Summer Olympic Games, and in 2020 will become the first Asian city to host the Summer Olympic Games twice. Tokyo will also be hosting the 2020 Summer Paralympics.

Bidding

Tokyo, Istanbul and Madrid were the three candidate cities. The applicant cities of Baku and Doha were not promoted to candidate status. A bid from Rome was withdrawn.

Vote

The IOC voted to select the host city of the 2020 Summer Olympics on 7 September 2013 at the 125th IOC Session at the Buenos Aires Hilton in Buenos Aires, Argentina. An exhaustive ballot system was used. No city won over 50% of the votes in the first round, and Madrid and Istanbul were tied for second place. A run-off vote between these two cities was held to determine which would be eliminated. In the final vote, a head-to-head contest between Tokyo and Istanbul, Tokyo was selected by 60 votes to 36.

2020 Summer Olympics host city election[2]
CityNOC nameRound 1RunoffRound 2
Tokyo Japan4260
Istanbul Turkey264936
Madrid Spain2645

Development and preparation

The Tokyo metropolitan government set aside a fund of 400 billion yen to cover the cost of hosting the Games. The Japanese government is considering increasing slot capacity at both Haneda Airport and Narita Airport by easing airspace restrictions. A new railway line is planned to link both airports through an expansion of Tokyo Station, cutting travel time from Tokyo Station to Haneda from 30 minutes to 18 minutes, and from Tokyo Station to Narita from 55 minutes to 36 minutes; the line would cost 400 billion yen and would be funded primarily by private investors. But East JR is planning a new route near Tamachi to Haneda Airport.[3] Funding is also planned to accelerate completion of the Central Circular Route, Tokyo Gaikan Expressway and Ken-Ō Expressway, and to refurbish other major expressways in the area.[4] There are also plans to extend the Yurikamome automated transit line from its existing terminal at Toyosu Station to a new terminal at Kachidoki Station, passing the site of the Olympic Village, although the Yurikamome would still not have adequate capacity to serve major events in the Odaiba area on its own.[5]

The Organizing Committee is headed by former Prime Minister Yoshiro Mori.[6] Sports minister Hakubun Shimomura is overseeing the preparations on behalf of the Japanese government.[7]

Sports

Following the 2012 Games, the IOC assessed the 26 sports held in London, with the remit of selecting 25 'core' sports to join new entrants golf and rugby sevens at the 2020 Games. In effect, this would involve the dropping of one sport from the 2016 Games program. This would leave a single vacancy in the 2020 Games program, which the IOC would seek to fill from a shortlist containing seven unrepresented sports and the removed sport. Events such as modern pentathlon, taekwondo and badminton were among those considered vulnerable.

On 12 February 2013, IOC leaders voted to drop wrestling from the Olympic program, a surprise decision that removed one of the oldest Olympic sports from the 2020 Games. Wrestling, which combines freestyle and Greco-Roman events, goes back to the inaugural modern Olympics in Athens in 1896,[8] and even further to the Ancient Olympics. The decision to drop wrestling was opposed in many countries and by their NOCs.[9][10][11][12] Wrestling therefore joined seven other sports in a list of eight applying for inclusion in the 2020 Games.

On 29 May 2013, it was announced that three sports remained in contention: squash, baseball/softball, and wrestling.[13] Five other sports (karate, roller sports, sport climbing, wakeboarding, and wushu) were excluded from consideration at this point. On 8 September at the 125th IOC Session, the IOC selected wrestling to be included in the Olympic program for 2020 and 2024. Wrestling secured 49 votes, while baseball/softball secured 24 votes and squash got 22 votes.[14]

Calendar

All dates are JST (UTC+9)

This calendar is adapted from the candidature file.[15]

OCOpening ceremonyEvent competitions1Gold medalsCCClosing ceremony
July / August22
Wed
23
Thu
24
Fri
25
Sat
26
Sun
27
Mon
28
Tue
29
Wed
30
Thu
31
Fri
1
Sat
2
Sun
3
Mon
4
Tue
5
Wed
6
Thu
7
Fri
8
Sat
9
Sun
Gold medals
CeremoniesOCCC
Archery11114
Athletics224665678147
Badminton1225
Basketball112
Boxing35513
Canoeing11216
Cycling11222111321118
Diving111111118
Equestrian211116
Fencing11112111110
Field hockey112
Football112
Golf112
Gymnastics11115518
Handball112
Judo222222214
Modern pentathlon112
Rowing334414
Rugby sevens22
Sailing222111110
Shooting22221212115
Swimming444444441134
Synchronized swimming112
Table tennis235
Taekwondo22228
Tennis234
Triathlon112
Volleyball11114
Water polo112
Weightlifting122222111115
Wrestling2232222318
Total gold medals00011161621191923212520191523173011306
Cumulative total0001127436483102125146171191210225248265295306
July / August22
Wed
23
Thu
24
Fri
25
Sat
26
Sun
27
Mon
28
Tue
29
Wed
30
Thu
31
Fri
1
Sat
2
Sun
3
Mon
4
Tue
5
Wed
6
Thu
7
Fri
8
Sat
9
Sun
Gold medals


Venues

The Tokyo Big Sight Conference Tower would be used as the International Broadcast Center
View of the Rainbow Bridge from Odaiba Marine Park
The Wakasu Olympic Marina, where Sailing will be held

It was confirmed in February 2012 that the National Olympic Stadium in Tokyo would receive a $1 billion upgrade and full–scale reconstruction for the 2019 Rugby World Cup as well as the 2020 Olympics.[16] As a result, a design competition for the new stadium was launched. In November 2012 the Japan Sport Council announced that out of 46 finalists, Zaha Hadid Architects was awarded the design for the new stadium. Plans include dismantling the original stadium, and expanding the capacity from 50,000 to a modern Olympic capacity of about 80,000.[17]

28 of the 33 competition venues in Tokyo are within 8 kilometres (5 miles) of the Olympic Village. 11 new venues are to be constructed.[18]

Heritage Zone

Seven venues will be located within the central business area of Tokyo, northwest of the Olympic Village. Several of these venues were also used for the 1964 Summer Olympics.

Tokyo Bay Zone

21 venues will be located in the vicinity of Tokyo Bay, southeast of the Olympic Village, predominantly on Ariake, Odaiba and the surrounding artificial islands.

Sites farther than 8 km (5 miles) from the Olympic Village

Football venues

The Sapporo Dome in Sapporo

Non-competition venues

Media

Broadcasting

On 6 January 2011, the IOC announced that it was considering packaging the U.S. television rights for four Olympics instead of the usual two: the 2016 and 2020 Summer Olympics, and the 2014 and 2018 Winter Olympics. The IOC's lead negotiator Richard Carrion told the Associated Press the bidding war would be waged among NBC, ESPN, Fox and perhaps a CBS/Turner coalition. "We realize this is a major decision going forward for any of these guys," the IOC member from Puerto Rico said. "I would certainly support it if they want to go to four games, and do all the way to 2020."[19]

IOC president Jacques Rogge heads the exclusive TV Rights and New Media Commission, but the organization of bidding falls to Carrion, who meets regularly with the networks to stoke interest in airing Sochi 2014 and Rio de Janeiro 2016. In packaging four Olympics, Carrion had another two Games to sell, but the 2018 host city would not be selected until 6 July 2011, and the 2020 host until 2013. The IOC took its time to seek a new deal for the U.S., hoping to ride out a recession to get the best price possible. The U.S. television rights are the IOC's single-largest source of revenue.[19]

On 7 June 2011, the IOC awarded the U.S. television rights for the four Olympics to NBC in a deal worth more than $4 billion.[20]

Below are the confirmed television right holders:

Notes

  1. ^ "Olympics 2020: Tokyo wins race to host Games". BBC. 7 September 2013. Retrieved 23 September 2013. 
  2. ^ "2020 Olympics Vote Total Box". Associated Press. Miami Herald. 7 September 2013. Retrieved 8 September 2013. 
  3. ^ JR東日本、東京五輪を前に都心部と羽田空港結ぶ新路線整備を on YouTube
  4. ^ "羽田・成田発着を拡大、五輪へインフラ整備急ぐ". 日本経済新聞. 10 September 2013. Retrieved 10 September 2013. 
  5. ^ "五輪で東京に1000万人 過密都市ゆえの課題多く". 日本経済新聞. 10 September 2013. Retrieved 10 September 2013. 
  6. ^ 6:00 PM PST (2014-01-24). "Mori heads Tokyo 2020 organizing committee - Yahoo Sports". Sports.yahoo.com. Retrieved 2014-02-04. 
  7. ^ Japan's Sports Minister Shimomura to lead Tokyo 2020 preparations
  8. ^ Wilson, Stephen. "IOC Drops Wrestling From 2020 Olympics". ABC. Associated Press. Retrieved 2/12/2013. 
  9. ^ Supron odesłał medal IO na znak protestu - Sporty walki - www.orange.pl
  10. ^ Staff (14 February 2013). "IOC drops wrestling from 2020 Olympics". ESPN. Retrieved 7 March 2013. 
  11. ^ Gallagher, Jack (6 March 2013). "Wrestlers promote Tokyo's 2020 Olympic bid". Yahoo! Sports. Retrieved 7 March 2013. 
  12. ^ Staff (3 March 2013). "Bulgaria's wrestling coach starts hunger strike". USA Today. Retrieved 7 March 2013. 
  13. ^ IOC: Baseball/softball, squash and wrestling make cut for IOC Session vote in Buenos Aires
  14. ^ "Wrestling added to Olympic programme for 2020 and 2024 Games". IOC. 8 September 2013. Retrieved 8 September 2013. 
  15. ^ "Candidature file for the Tokyo 2020 Summer Olympics". p. 8-9. Retrieved 9 September 2013. 
  16. ^ Super Bowl Ads; Japan National Stadium Upgrade; Contador Banned
  17. ^ New National Stadium design announced, boosting Tokyo Olympic bid
  18. ^ "Tokyo 2020 candidature file - section 8 - Sports and Venues". Tokyo 2020. Retrieved 10 September 2013. 
  19. ^ a b "Bidders Want U.S. TV Rights Through 2020; Sochi Progress". Aroundtherings.com. 6 January 2011. Retrieved 5 March 2012. 
  20. ^ McCarthy, Michael (7 June 2011). "NBC wins U.S. TV rights to four Olympic Games through 2020". USA Today. 
  21. ^ "IOC awards TV rights in Germany, Korea, France". USA Today. 5 July 2011. Retrieved 27 March 2012. 
  22. ^ a b "IOC awards SBS broadcast rights for 2018, 2020, 2022 and 2024 Olympic Games". Olympic.org. 4 July 2011. Retrieved 2011-08-18. 
  23. ^ "IOC awards broadcast rights in United Kingdom for 2014, 2016, 2018 and 2020 Olympic Games to the BBC". Olympic.org. 18 July 2012. Retrieved 2012-07-18. 
  24. ^ "IOC awards US broadcast rights for 2014, 2016, 2018 and 2020 Olympic Games to NBCUniversal". Olympic.org. 7 June 2011. Retrieved 8 June 2011. 

External links

Preceded by
Rio de Janeiro
Summer Olympic Games
Tokyo

XXXII Olympiad (2020)
Succeeded by
TBD 2024