2014 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

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2014 NCAA Men's Division I
Basketball Tournament
2014NCAAFinalFourLogo.png
2014 Final Four logo
Season2013–14
Teams68
Finals siteAT&T Stadium
Arlington, Texas
ChampionsConnecticut (4th title, 4th title game,
5th Final Four)
Runner-upKentucky (12th title game,
16th Final Four)
SemifinalistsFlorida (5th Final Four)
Wisconsin (3rd Final Four)
Winning coachKevin Ollie (1st title)
MOPShabazz Napier Connecticut
NCAA Men's Division I Tournaments
«20132015»
 
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2014 NCAA Men's Division I
Basketball Tournament
2014NCAAFinalFourLogo.png
2014 Final Four logo
Season2013–14
Teams68
Finals siteAT&T Stadium
Arlington, Texas
ChampionsConnecticut (4th title, 4th title game,
5th Final Four)
Runner-upKentucky (12th title game,
16th Final Four)
SemifinalistsFlorida (5th Final Four)
Wisconsin (3rd Final Four)
Winning coachKevin Ollie (1st title)
MOPShabazz Napier Connecticut
NCAA Men's Division I Tournaments
«20132015»

The 2014 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 68 teams playing in a single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 18, 2014, and concluded with the Connecticut Huskies winning the championship game on April 7 at AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas.

The East Regional semifinals and final were held in Madison Square Garden, the first time that arena has been used as an NCAA Tournament venue and the first time in 63 years that tournament games have been held in New York City.

With No. 7 seed Connecticut and No. 8 seed Kentucky reaching the championship game, this tournament's final was the first ever to not include at least one 1, 2, or 3 seed. It is also only the third final to not feature a 1 or 2 seed (1989 - #3 Michigan vs. #3 Seton Hall and 2011 - #3 Connecticut vs. #8 Butler). Connecticut was the first 7 seed to ever reach and win the championship game. The two teams combined for the highest seed total in championship game history with 15. The previous record (11) was held by Connecticut and Butler in 2011.

On April 8, the UConn Huskies women's team won the women's NCAA basketball tournament, only the second time that a school has won both the men's and women's Division I national basketball championships in the same year (the other time being UConn in 2004).[1]

The previous season, UConn was academically ineligible for the postseason.

Tournament procedure[edit]

For 2014 the selection committee picked a total of 68 teams that would enter the 2014 tournament, of which 32 were "automatic bids" (teams winning their conference tournaments, with the exception of the Ivy League, which does not host a post-season conference tournament; thus, its regular-season conference champion is awarded the automatic bid) while the remaining 36 were "at large" bids which were extended by the NCAA Selection Committee on the Sunday preceding the First Four play-in tournament and dubbed Selection Sunday by the media and fans. The Selection Committee also seeded the entire field from 1 to 68.[2]

Eight teams – the four lowest-seeded automatic qualifiers and the four lowest-seeded at-large teams – played in the First Four (the successor to what had been popularly known as "play-in games" through the 2010 tournament). The winners of those games advanced to the main draw of the tournament.

Notables[edit]

Wichita State became the first team since UNLV in 1991 to go into the tournament undefeated. The Shockers entered the tournament 34-0. Their perfect record would be spoiled by Kentucky in the Third Round.

MEAC champion North Carolina Central University[3] and Big West champion Cal Poly[4] made their first NCAA Division I tournament appearances.

For only the second time since 1973 no teams from the state of Indiana (a state noted for its basketball powerhouse programs) were in the tournament.[5]

There were five overtime games in the Second Round of the tournament, the most overtime games ever in tournament history. In contrast, the previous two tournaments had two overtime games combined.

North Dakota State's victory against Oklahoma secured the first tournament win for the state of North Dakota. Mercer, Stephen F. Austin, Albany, and Cal Poly had their first NCAA tournament wins. Cal Poly's victory over Texas Southern marked only the third time a team with a losing record won a game in the tournament.

Notable upsets included: Mercer over Duke, Dayton over Ohio State and, later, over Syracuse, North Dakota State over Oklahoma, Stephen F. Austin over VCU, Harvard over Cincinnati (its second-consecutive upset in as many years as a #12 seed), Stanford over Kansas, Kentucky over previously unbeaten Wichita State and, later, over Michigan, and UConn over Villanova and, later, over #1 overall seed Florida.

The National Championship game is the first one to not involve a 1, 2, or a 3 seed, and featured the two lowest seeds ever to meet (#7 UConn and #8 Kentucky). UConn was the first #7 seed to both reach, and win, the championship game.

2014 NCAA Tournament schedule and venues[edit]

2014 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament is located in USA
Dayton
Dayton
Buffalo
Buffalo
Milwaukee
Milwaukee
Orlando
Orlando
Spokane
Spokane
Raleigh
Raleigh
San Antonio
San Antonio
San Diego
San Diego
St. Louis
St. Louis
2014 First Four (black) and second and third rounds (green)
2014 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament is located in USA
Anaheim
Anaheim
Memphis
Memphis
Indianapolis
Indianapolis
New York City
New York City
Arlington
Arlington
2014 Regionals (blue) and Final Four (red)

The following are the sites selected to host each round of the 2014 tournament:[6]

First Four

Second and third rounds

Regional semifinals and finals (Sweet Sixteen and Elite Eight)

National semifinals and championship (Final Four and Championship)

Qualified teams[edit]

Automatic qualifiers[edit]

The following teams are automatic qualifiers for the 2014 NCAA field by virtue of winning their conference's tournament (except for the Ivy League, whose regular-season champion receives the automatic bid).

ConferenceTeamAppearanceLast bid
ACCVirginia18th2012
America EastAlbany4th2013
AmericanLouisville40th2013
Atlantic 10St. Joseph's20th2008
Atlantic SunMercer3rd1985
Big 12Iowa State16th2013
Big EastProvidence16th2004
Big SkyWeber State15th2007
Big SouthCoastal Carolina3rd1993
Big TenMichigan State27th2013
Big WestCal Poly1stNever
ColonialDelaware5th1999
C-USATulsa15th2003
HorizonMilwaukee4th2006
Ivy LeagueHarvard4th2013
MAACManhattan7th2004
MACWestern Michigan4th2004
MEACNorth Carolina Central1stNever
Missouri ValleyWichita State11th2013
Mountain WestNew Mexico15th2013
NortheastMount St. Mary's4th2008
Ohio ValleyEastern Kentucky8th2007
Pac-12UCLA46th2013
PatriotAmerican3rd2009
SECFlorida19th2013
SouthernWofford3rd2011
SouthlandStephen F. Austin2nd2009
SWACTexas Southern5th2003
SummitNorth Dakota State2nd2009
Sun BeltLouisiana–Lafayette6th2000
West CoastGonzaga17th2013
WACNew Mexico State21st2013

Tournament seeds[edit]

South Region – Memphis
SeedSchoolConferenceRecordBerth typeOverall rank[7]
1FloridaSEC32–2Automatic1
2KansasBig 1224–9At–large7
3SyracuseACC27–5At–large10
4UCLAPac-1226–8Automatic15
5VCUAtlantic 1026–8At–large19
6Ohio StateBig Ten25–9At–large22
7New MexicoMountain West27–6Automatic28
8ColoradoPac-1223–11At–large32
9PittsburghACC25–9At–large36
10StanfordPac-1221–12At–large37
11DaytonAtlantic 1023–10At–large41
12Stephen F. AustinSouthland31–2Automatic50
13TulsaC-USA21–12Automatic52
14Western MichiganMAC23–9Automatic55
15Eastern KentuckyOhio Valley24–9Automatic59
16*AlbanyAmerica East18–14Automatic66
Mount St. Mary'sNortheast16–16Automatic65
West Region – Anaheim
SeedSchoolConferenceRecordBerth typeOverall rank
1ArizonaPac-1230–4At–large2
2WisconsinBig Ten26–7At–large8
3CreightonBig East26–7At–large11
4San Diego StateMountain West29–4At–large16
5OklahomaBig 1223–9At–large20
6BaylorBig 1224–11At–large24
7OregonPac-1223–9At–large27
8GonzagaWest Coast28–6Automatic30
9Oklahoma StateBig 1221–12At–large35
10BYUWest Coast23–11At–large39
11NebraskaBig Ten19–12At–large42
12North Dakota StateSummit25–6Automatic48
13New Mexico StateWAC26–9Automatic53
14Louisiana-LafayetteSun Belt23–11Automatic57
15AmericanPatriot20–12Automatic62
16Weber StateBig Sky19–11Automatic64
East Region – New York City
SeedSchoolConferenceRecordBerth typeOverall rank
1VirginiaACC28–6Automatic4
2VillanovaBig East28–4At-Large5
3Iowa StateBig 1226–7Automatic12
4Michigan StateBig Ten26–8Automatic14
5CincinnatiAmerican27–6At–large17
6North CarolinaACC23–9At–large21
7ConnecticutAmerican26–8At–large26
8MemphisAmerican23–9At–large31
9George WashingtonAtlantic 1024–8At–large34
10St. Joseph'sAtlantic 1024–9Automatic38
11ProvidenceBig East23–11Automatic43
12HarvardIvy26–4Automatic49
13DelawareColonial25–9Automatic54
14North Carolina CentralMEAC28–5Automatic58
15MilwaukeeHorizon21–13Automatic60
16Coastal CarolinaBig South21–12Automatic63
Midwest Region – Indianapolis
SeedSchoolConferenceRecordBerth typeOverall rank
1Wichita StateMVC34–0Automatic3
2MichiganBig Ten25–8At-large6
3DukeACC26–8At–large9
4LouisvilleAmerican29–5Automatic13
5Saint LouisAtlantic 1026–6At–large18
6MassachusettsAtlantic 1024–8At–large23
7TexasBig 1223–10At–large25
8KentuckySEC24–10At–large29
9Kansas StateBig 1220–12At–large33
10Arizona StatePac-1221–11At–large40
11*IowaBig Ten20–12At–large45
TennesseeSEC21–12At–large44
12*NC StateACC21–13At–large47
XavierBig East21–12At–large46
13ManhattanMAAC25–7Automatic51
14MercerAtlantic Sun26–8Automatic56
15WoffordSouthern20–12Automatic61
16*Cal PolyBig West13–19Automatic68
Texas SouthernSWAC19–14Automatic67

Bracket[edit]

* – Denotes overtime period

Unless otherwise noted, all times listed are Eastern Daylight Time (UTC-04)

First Four – Dayton, Ohio[edit]

March 18 – Midwest Region
   
12NC State74
12Xavier59
March 18 – South Region
   
16Albany71
16Mount St. Mary's64
March 19 – Midwest Region
   
11Iowa65
11Tennessee78*
March 19 – Midwest Region
   
16Cal Poly81
16Texas Southern69

South Regional – Memphis, Tennessee[edit]

Second round
Round of 64
March 20–21
Third round
Round of 32
March 22–23
Regional semifinals
Sweet 16
March 27
Regional finals
Elite 8
March 29
            
1Florida67
16Albany55
1Florida61
Orlando - Thu/Sat
9Pittsburgh45
8Colorado48
9Pittsburgh77
1Florida79
4UCLA68
5VCU75
12Stephen F. Austin77*
12Stephen F. Austin60
San Diego - Fri/Sun
4UCLA77
4UCLA76
13Tulsa59
1Florida62
11Dayton52
6Ohio State59
11Dayton60
11Dayton55
Buffalo - Thu/Sat
3Syracuse53
3Syracuse77
14Western Michigan53
11Dayton82
10Stanford72
7New Mexico53
10Stanford58
10Stanford60
St. Louis - Fri/Sun
2Kansas57
2Kansas80
15Eastern Kentucky69

Regional Final summary[edit]

TBS
Saturday, March 29
5:09 pm CT
#1 Florida Gators 62, #11 Dayton Flyers 52
Pts: S. Wilbekin - 23
Rebs: D. Finney-Smith - 9
Asts: K. Hill, S. Wilbekin - 3
Pts: D. Pierre - 18
Rebs: M. Kavanaugh - 8
Asts: D. Pierre - 5
Halftime Score: Florida, 38-24
FedEx Forum - Memphis, TN
Attendance: 15,443
Referees: Mike Stuart, Pat Driscoll, Doug Shows

South Regional all-tournament team[edit]

Regional all-tournament team: Michael Frazier, Florida; Devin Oliver, Dayton; Dyshawn Pierre, Dayton; Dwight Powell, Stanford[8]

Regional most outstanding player: Scottie Wilbekin, Florida[9]

East Regional – New York City[edit]

Second round
Round of 64
March 20–21
Third round
Round of 32
March 22–23
Regional semifinals
Sweet 16
March 28
Regional finals
Elite 8
March 30
            
1Virginia70
16Coastal Carolina59
1Virginia78
Raleigh - Fri/Sun
8Memphis60
8Memphis71
9George Washington66
1Virginia59
4Michigan State61
5Cincinnati57
12Harvard61
12Harvard73
Spokane - Thu/Sat
4Michigan State80
4Michigan State93
13Delaware78
4Michigan State54
7Connecticut60
6North Carolina79
11Providence77
6North Carolina83
San Antonio - Fri/Sun
3Iowa State85
3Iowa State93
14NC Central75
3Iowa State76
7Connecticut81
7Connecticut89*
10St. Joseph's81
7Connecticut77
Buffalo - Thu/Sat
2Villanova65
2Villanova73
15Milwaukee53

Regional Final summary[edit]

CBS
Sunday, March 30
2:20 pm ET
#7 Connecticut Huskies 60, #4 Michigan State Spartans 54
Pts: S. Napier - 25
Rebs: D. Daniels - 8
Asts: S. Napier - 4
Pts: G. Harris - 22
Rebs: A. Payne - 9
Asts: A. Payne - 3
Halftime Score: Michigan State, 25-21
Madison Square Garden - New York, NY
Attendance: 19,499
Referees: Tom Eades, John Higgins, Michael Roberts

East Regional all-tournament team[edit]

Regional all-tournament team: DeAndre Daniels, Connecticut; Gary Harris, Michigan State; Dustin Hogue, Iowa State; Adreian Payne, Michigan State[10]

Regional most outstanding player: Shabazz Napier, Connecticut[11]

West Regional – Anaheim, California[edit]

Second round
Round of 64
March 20–21
Third round
Round of 32
March 22–23
Regional semifinals
Sweet 16
March 27
Regional finals
Elite 8
March 29
            
1Arizona68
16Weber State59
1Arizona84
San Diego - Fri/Sun
8Gonzaga61
8Gonzaga85
9Oklahoma State77
1Arizona70
4San Diego State64
5Oklahoma75
12North Dakota State80*
12North Dakota State44
Spokane - Thu/Sat
4San Diego State63
4San Diego State73*
13New Mexico State69
1Arizona63
2Wisconsin64*
6Baylor74
11Nebraska60
6Baylor85
San Antonio - Fri/Sun
3Creighton55
3Creighton76
14Louisiana–Lafayette66
6Baylor52
2Wisconsin69
7Oregon87
10BYU68
7Oregon77
Milwaukee - Thu/Sat
2Wisconsin85
2Wisconsin75
15American35

Regional Final summary[edit]

TBS
Saturday, March 29
5:49 pm PT
#2 Wisconsin Badgers 64, #1 Arizona Wildcats 63 (OT)
Pts: F. Kaminsky - 28
Rebs: F. Kaminsky - 11
Asts: T. Jackson - 5
Pts: N. Johnson - 16
Rebs: A. Gordon - 18
Asts: N. Johnson - 3
Halftime Score: Arizona, 28-25
End of Regulation: 54-54
Honda Center - Anaheim, CA
Attendance: 17,814
Referees: Bryan Kersey, Tony Greene, Mike Eades

West Regional all-tournament team[edit]

Regional all-tournament team: Aaron Gordon, Arizona; Traevon Jackson, Wisconsin; Nick Johnson, Arizona; Xavier Thames, San Diego State[12]

Regional most outstanding player: Frank Kaminsky, Wisconsin

Midwest Regional – Indianapolis, Indiana[edit]

Second round
Round of 64
March 20–21
Third round
Round of 32
March 22–23
Regional semifinals
Sweet 16
March 28
Regional finals
Elite 8
March 30
            
1Wichita State64
16Cal Poly37
1Wichita State76
St. Louis - Fri/Sun
8Kentucky78
8Kentucky56
9Kansas State49
8Kentucky74
4Louisville69
5Saint Louis83*
12NC State80
5Saint Louis51
Orlando - Thu/Sat
4Louisville66
4Louisville71
13Manhattan64
8Kentucky75
2Michigan72
6Massachusetts67
11Tennessee86
11Tennessee83
Raleigh - Fri/Sun
14Mercer63
3Duke71
14Mercer78
11Tennessee71
2Michigan73
7Texas87
10Arizona State85
7Texas65
Milwaukee - Thu/Sat
2Michigan79
2Michigan57
15Wofford40

Regional Final summary[edit]

CBS
Sunday, March 30
5:05 pm ET
#8 Kentucky Wildcats 75, #2 Michigan Wolverines 72
Pts: J. Randle - 16
Rebs: J. Randle - 11
Asts: An. Harrison - 6
Pts: N. Stauskas - 24
Rebs: J. Morgan, G. Robinson III - 4
Asts: C. LeVert - 5
Halftime Score: 37-37
Lucas Oil Stadium - Indianapolis, IN
Attendance: 35,551
Referees: Ed Corbett, Don Daily, Randall McCall

Midwest Regional all-tournament team[edit]

Regional all-tournament team: Aaron Harrison, Kentucky; Marcus Lee, Kentucky; Caris LeVert, Michigan; Nik Stauskas, Michigan

Regional most outstanding player: Julius Randle, Kentucky[13]

Final Four[edit]

During the Final Four round, regardless of the seeds of the participating teams, the champion of the top overall top seed's region plays against the champion of the fourth-ranked top seed's region, and the champion of the second overall top seed's region plays against the champion of the third-ranked top seed's region.[14] Florida (placed in the South Regional) was selected as the top overall seed, and Virginia (in the East Regional) was named as the fourth and final #1 seed.[15] Thus, the South champion (Florida) played the East Champion (Connecticut) in one semifinal game, and the West Champion (Wisconsin) faced the Midwest Champion (Kentucky) in the other semifinal game.[16]

Arlington, TX[edit]

National Semifinals
April 5
National Championship Game
April 7
      
S1Florida53
E7Connecticut63
E7Connecticut60
MW8Kentucky54
W2Wisconsin73
MW8Kentucky74

Game Summaries[edit]

Final Four[edit]

TBS
TNT
truTV
Saturday, April 5
5:15 pm CT
#7 Connecticut Huskies 63, #1 Florida Gators 53
Pts: D. Daniels - 20
Rebs: D. Daniels - 10
Asts: S. Napier - 6
Pts: P. Young - 19
Rebs: C. Prather - 6
Asts: S. Wilbekin, C. Prather, D. Finney-Smith - 1
Halftime Score: Connecticut, 25-22
AT&T Stadium - Arlington, TX
Attendance: 79,444[17]
Referees: John Higgins, Michael Stephens, Doug Simmons
TBS
TNT
truTV
Saturday, April 5, 2014
8:12 pm CT
#8 Kentucky Wildcats 74, #2 Wisconsin Badgers 73
Pts: J. Young - 17
Rebs: D. Johnson, A. Poythress - 7
Asts: An. Harrison - 4
Pts: B. Brust, S. Dekker - 15
Rebs: J. Gasser, F. Kaminsky - 5
Asts: T. Jackson, J. Gasser - 3
Halftime Score: Wisconsin, 40-36
AT&T Stadium - Arlington, TX
Attendance: 79,444[18]
Referees: Mike Stuart, Pat Adams, Terry Wymer

National Championship[edit]

CBS
Monday, April 7, 2014
8:10 pm CT
#7 Connecticut Huskies 60, #8 Kentucky Wildcats 54
Pts: S. Napier - 22
Rebs: L. Kromah, D. Daniels, S. Napier - 6
Asts: R. Boatright, S. Napier - 3
Pts: J. Young - 20
Rebs: J. Young - 7
Asts: An. Harrison - 5
Halftime Score: Connecticut, 35-31
AT&T Stadium - Arlington, TX
Attendance: 79,238[19]
Referees: Verne Harris, Doug Shows, Joe DeRosa

Final Four all-tournament team[edit]

Record by conference[edit]

ConferenceBidsRecordWin %R64R32S16E8F4CGNC
American49–3.7504321111
SEC312–3.800333221
Big Ten610–6.62553331
Pac-1268–6.5716431
Atlantic 1064–6.4006211
Big 1276–7.462742
ACC66–6.500641
Mountain West22–2.500211
Big East42–4.33332
WCC21–2.33321
Atlantic Sun11–1.50011
Ivy11–1.50011
MVC11–1.50011
Southland11–1.50011
Summit11–1.50011
America East11–1.5001
Big West11–1.5001

Media coverage[edit]

Television[edit]

The year 2014 marked the fourth year of a 14-year partnership between CBS and Turner cable networks TBS, TNT and truTV to cover the entire tournament under the NCAA March Madness banner. TBS aired the Final Four for the first year since CBS' 32 consecutive years of airing. The tournament was considered a ratings success. Tournament games averaged 10.5 million viewers, and the championship game garnered an average of 21.2 million viewers and a peak viewership of 24.3 million.

Studio hosts[21][edit]

Studio analysts[21][edit]

Commentary teams [21][22][23][edit]

Team casts[edit]

For the first time in the history of the tournament, Turner broadcast the semifinals. TBS aired the traditional neutral broadcast (with Nantz/Anthony/Kerr/Wolfson commentator set that is also being used for CBS's national championship coverage). However, Turner also distributed team-centered broadcasts for the Final Four broadcasts on TNT and truTV. The announcers for these broadcasts are as follows:[23]

International[edit]

ESPN International distributes broadcast rights to the tournament outside the United States, and will produce separate international broadcasts of the semi-final and championship games with announcers Dan Shulman (play-by-play), Dick Vitale (analyst for the final and one semi-final), and Jay Bilas (analyst for the other semi-final).[24] For the initial rounds, they use CBS/Turner coverage with an additional host to transition between games, with whiparound coverage similar to the CBS-only era. ESPN also has exclusive digital rights to the NCAA tournament outside of North America.

In Canada, the broadcasting rights are with TSN.[25] In The Philippines it's aired on TV5.[26]

Radio[edit]

WestwoodOne has exclusive national radio rights to the entire tournament.[27] Team radio networks also hold the rights to broadcast their teams through their entire progression within the tournament and no flagship restrictions. However men's team radio networks cannot stream the games online during the NCAA tournament. WestwoodOne is the only group authorized to stream the tournament online.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Party continues with title sweep". ESPN. Associated Press. April 9, 2014. 
  2. ^ http://www.marchmadness2014.net/betting-system-a-few-simple-tips-for-betting-on-the-ncaa-tournament/
  3. ^ NCCU claims historic MEAC title, lands 1st NCAA Tournament berth
  4. ^ Cal Poly wins Big West tourney for first ever NCAA bid
  5. ^ Macur, Juliet (March 16, 2014). "For Land of Hoops, No Shot in N.C.A.A. Tournamen t". The New York Times. Retrieved March 17, 2014. 
  6. ^ "Preliminary round sites announced for 2014, 2015 NCAA tournaments". NCAA. December 16, 2012. Retrieved May 12, 2013. 
  7. ^ Borzello, Jeff. "Official NCAA 1-68 seeding order". CBS Sports. Retrieved March 20, 2014. 
  8. ^ "NCAA tournament: Florida finally gets over the hump in Elite Eight, beats Dayton for Final Four berth". The Washington Post. 
  9. ^ "Wilbekin's shot pivotal in turning momentum for Florida". Fort Worth Star-Telegram. 
  10. ^ "ISU's Hogue named to all-East Region team". Des Moines Register. 
  11. ^ "UConn Advances to Final Four with 60-54 Win Over Michigan State". UConnHuskies.com. 
  12. ^ "Badgers men's basketball notes: Yet again, Frank Kaminsky's play has everyone talking". Madison.com. 
  13. ^ "U-M Has Tourney Run End on Last-Second Shot by Kentucky". MGOBLUE.com - University of Michigan Official Athletic Site. 
  14. ^ "2013-14 NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Championship – Principles And Procedures For Establishing The Bracket". NCAA. Retrieved March 27, 2014. "The committee will place the four No. 1 seeded teams 1 through 4 in each of the four regions, thus determining the Final Four semifinals pairings (overall 1 vs. 4; 2 vs. 3)." 
  15. ^ "Official NCAA 1-68 seeding order". CBS Sports. March 16, 2014. Retrieved March 17, 2014. 
  16. ^ "2014 NCAA Tournament Printable Bracket". probasketballtalk.com. NBC Sports. Retrieved March 17, 2014. 
  17. ^ "Final Four: Connecticut vs. Florida". Stat Broadcast. Retrieved 2014-04-05. 
  18. ^ "Final Four: Kentucky vs. Wisconsin". Stat Broadcast. Retrieved 2014-04-05. 
  19. ^ "Championship: Connecticut vs. Kentucky". Stat Broadcast. Retrieved 2014-04-07. 
  20. ^ Paulsen. "2014 March Madness TV Schedule on CBS, TBS, TNT and TruTV". Sports Media Watch. Retrieved March 11, 2014. 
  21. ^ a b c "CBS/Turner Releases the Tip Times and Announcing Assignments for First Two Rounds of 2014 NCAA Tournament". Fangs Bites. March 16, 2014. Retrieved March 16, 2014. 
  22. ^ "2014 NCAA Tournament Tip Times and Announcing Assignments for Sweet 16". Fangs Bites. March 23, 2014. Retrieved March 23, 2014. 
  23. ^ a b "CBS/Turner Announces 2014 NCAA Men’s Final Four Broadcast Plans ☆". Fangs Bites. April 1, 2014. Retrieved April 1, 2014. 
  24. ^ Blackburn, Gracie (March 6, 2014). "Bilas, Shulman and Vitale to Call Final Four Games for ESPN International". ESPN MediaZone. Retrieved March 6, 2014. 
  25. ^ http://www.tsn.ca/story/?id=446577
  26. ^ http://www.interaksyon.com/interaktv/tv5-to-air-us-ncaa-march-madness
  27. ^ "NCAA, Westwood One extend deal". NCAA. January 13, 2011. Retrieved May 12, 2013. 
  28. ^ a b "2014 NCAA Men's Division 1 Tournament Week 1 Schedule". Eye on Sky and Air Sports. March 17, 2014. Retrieved March 17, 2014. 
  29. ^ "2014 NCAA Men's Division 1 Tournament Week 2 Schedule". Eye on Sky and Air Sports. March 23, 2014. Retrieved March 23, 2014. 
  30. ^ "2014 NCAA Men's Division I Tournament Final Four & Championship Broadcast Information". Eye on Sky and Air Sports. April 1, 2014. Retrieved April 1, 2014.