1000 Ways to Die

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1000 Ways to Die
TWTDlogo.jpg
Title screen
Genrehorror, dark comedy, Splatter
FormatLive-action
Written byTom McMahon
H.A. Arnarson
Geoff Miller
Directed byTom McMahon
Narrated byThom Beers (pilot, U.S. broadcast)
Ron Perlman (seasons 1, 2, 3 & 4 U.S. broadcast)
Joe Irwin[1] (Season 4, U.S. broadcast)
Alisdair Simpson (pilot & series 1, 2, 3 & 4 UK broadcast)
Country of originUnited States
Original language(s)English
No. of seasons4
No. of episodes74
Production
Running time22 minutes
Production company(s)Original Productions
DistributorFremantleMedia Enterprises
Broadcast
Original channelSpike
Picture format480i (SDTV)
1080i (HDTV)
Original runMay 14, 2008 (2008-05-14) – July 15, 2012 (2012-07-15)[2]
Chronology
Related shows1000 Ways to Lie
External links
Website
 
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1000 Ways to Die
TWTDlogo.jpg
Title screen
Genrehorror, dark comedy, Splatter
FormatLive-action
Written byTom McMahon
H.A. Arnarson
Geoff Miller
Directed byTom McMahon
Narrated byThom Beers (pilot, U.S. broadcast)
Ron Perlman (seasons 1, 2, 3 & 4 U.S. broadcast)
Joe Irwin[1] (Season 4, U.S. broadcast)
Alisdair Simpson (pilot & series 1, 2, 3 & 4 UK broadcast)
Country of originUnited States
Original language(s)English
No. of seasons4
No. of episodes74
Production
Running time22 minutes
Production company(s)Original Productions
DistributorFremantleMedia Enterprises
Broadcast
Original channelSpike
Picture format480i (SDTV)
1080i (HDTV)
Original runMay 14, 2008 (2008-05-14) – July 15, 2012 (2012-07-15)[2]
Chronology
Related shows1000 Ways to Lie
External links
Website

1000 Ways to Die is an anthology television series that premiered on Spike on May 14, 2008, and ended on July 15, 2012.[2] The program recreates unusual supposed deaths and debunked urban legends[3] and includes interviews with experts who describe the science behind each death. Up until the end of season one, the final story of each episode showed actual footage of dangerous situations that almost ended in death, along with interviews with people involved in the situations. A portion of these deaths have been nominated for or have received a Darwin Award. Ron Perlman served as the narrator on every episode since the third episode (with Thom Beers narrating the first two episodes); beginning with the episode "Tweets from the Dead" Joe Irwin was featured as the replacement narrator.[4]

The show was cancelled after the airing of "Death, The Final Frontier". This was done after the producers and stars of the show ran a strike against Spike.[5]

Stylization[edit]

1000 Ways to Die takes a tongue-in-cheek approach to death through its presentation of stories derived from both myths and science, and the show makes liberal use of artistic license to significantly embellish or change the circumstances of real-life incidents that resulted in death for greater entertainment value. A frequently recurring motif is that of unsympathetic individuals' choices backfiring on them, resulting in death. The show is filled with black humor (particularly in the narration) which tempers the otherwise somber theme of death. It portrays the deaths using live-action recreations of the events along with expert and sometimes witness testimony, also using graphic computer-generated imagery animations, similar to those used in the popular TV show CSI, to illustrate the ways people have died. A narration provides background information within each death-story, which all end with titles that are puns on popular figures of speech.

Content rating[edit]

1000 Ways To Die is rated TV-14 for graphic, bloody violence. In addition to the V (violence) sub-letter, the show is also rated TV-14 for moderate sexual content (women in skimpy clothing and scenes of sexual intercourse), and language.

Episodes[edit]

SeasonEpisodesPremiere dateFinale date
112May 14, 2008 (2008-05-14)April 5, 2009 (2009-04-05)
212December 6, 2009 (2009-12-06)February 24, 2010 (2010-02-24)
3 (2010)13August 3, 2010 (2010-08-03)December 29, 2010 (2010-12-29)
3 (2011)23January 5, 2011 (2011-01-05)November 21, 2011 (2011-11-21)
3 (2012)6January 25, 2012 (2012-01-25)February 29, 2012 (2012-02-29)
48March 12, 2012 (2012-03-12)July 15, 2012 (2012-07-15)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]